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August 28 2014

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11 posts tagged "Ralph Rucci"

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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Hood by AirPUBLIC SCHOOL

Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne, the designers of Public School, proved that they’re worthy recipients of the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund’s top prize. They showed womenswear alongside their menswear for the first time at Milk Studios yesterday, but what I like about them is that they’re not trying to run before they can walk. Here, for both boys and girls, they stuck to their multilayered, street-meets-high fashion guns. They also had a great casting, completely un-self-conscious in its diversity. Why can’t more designers figure that out?

HOOD BY AIR

Speaking of casting, Kevin Amato, who fills the Hood by Air runway with a spectacular group of mostly nonprofessional models of every color and gender, is at the top of his game. The show was ten or so looks too long and the catwalk inside Chelsea Piers about a mile too long, but nothing could detract from the impression that this is the most exciting label in New York right now. (For more on that, see Maya Singer’s profile in the last issue of Style.com/Print.) Designer Shayne Oliver continued to find ways to breathe new life into logo sweatshirts—a neater trick than it sounds—and pushed his aesthetic forward in dynamic, multizippered outfits in leather, suede, and velvet. The finale of voguers hair-whipped the crowd into delirium. You can enjoy the energy of that, but don’t overlook how much thought and hard work Oliver is putting into honing his vision.

MANOLO BLAHNIK

From Hood to haute. Five blocks away at the Paul Kasmin Gallery, the charming designer Manolo Blahnik was showing off his charming shoes against the backdrop of four charming films directed by his friend Michael Roberts. Blahnik, indomitable despite the fact that he was nursing a sinus infection and a sprained neck, held up a shoe and offered it for inspection to Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, the stylist. It had a curtain of tasseled fringe across the instep. “Ca je deteste,” said De Dudzeele, not so much dismissing Blahnik’s work as the entire notion of tasseled fringe. Blahnik was visibly tickled by his friend’s honesty. “You need people like that,” he said. “Who tell you.” Besides, De Dudzeele’s restless eye had already fastened onto another shoe. This one she j’adored.

DINNER AT INDOCHINE

I ran home after Diane von Furstenberg’s show, a celebration of the remarkable forty-year run of her wrap dress. I caught up with some editing, and then Susan and I headed out to a dinner celebrating the appointment of Kyle Hagler as president of the New York division of Next Model Management (or, as we like to think of him, Kyle “The Cover” Hagler—the guy’s relentless in trying to place his clients on the cover of your magazine). During seventeen years at IMG, Hagler was instrumental in building the careers of Liya Kebede and Joan Smalls, among others, and has done as much as any model agent to champion diversity (though I suspect he sees it less as breaking barriers than simply erasing them). Now he gets to run the show.

On the way out, we ran into our buddy Waris Ahluwalia. “Sorry,” I said. “I think I missed your event.” He’d had a tasting for his line of teas at The Standard earlier that afternoon. “That’s OK,” Waris shot back. “It was really only meant to be for friends and family anyway.”

READ THIS REVIEW NOW

Yesterday, Tim Blanks produced and hosted three videos for us, went to a designer’s studio to report a story for the next issue of our magazine, and knocked off a couple of reviews, including this marvel of lucidity that arrived in my inbox at 2:09 a.m. That amounts to a light day for Tim.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos / InDigitalimages.com

The Next Big Thing: 5:31 Jérôme Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month kicks into gear, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

5:31 Jérôme

Label: 5:31 Jérôme, by Jérôme LaMaar

Need to know: When he set out to design his second collection, Jérôme LaMaar channeled a huntress. He said he wanted to design bold, colorful clothes for a strong, feminine woman. In a palette of fuchsia, raspberry, deep sienna, and rich eggplant, LaMaar’s clothes made a statement. But he kept in mind how women want to dress right now. We want something easy.

Mixed materials, intricate seams, and hidden zippers are becoming LaMaar’s signatures, but his focus on tailoring (honed during an apprenticeship with Ralph Rucci) meant everything looked sharp and refined. LaMaar consciously didn’t include any skirts in the collection, focusing instead on variations of the menswear trouser. Cropped gauchos, silk cargos, and tapered jeans were paired with little mohair sweaters, boxy jackets, and sheer blouses. Silk-and-wool jersey dresses molded to the body, and cocoon coats and sharp blazers were layered on top.

LaMaar’s fabric choices were key to his Fall ’14 success; double-face wool, ponte, silk jersey, suede, alpaca, and rubber were just a few. He played with high-tech materials as well. For instance, there was a utility vest that shifts from olive green to navy blue depending on the temperature. He also used a slick performance fabric for an orchid blazer. It repels water like an anorak, but looks about ten times chicer. For some grit, the designer painted a thick stripe of roughed-up black rubber on the hem of a classic gray blazer—an unexpected and very cool finish. You could see New York’s downtown darlings wearing it over their shoulders with leather pants and high-tops.

He says: “Everything is an evolution from what I did last season—it’s more mature. I want you to wear it,” LaMaar told Style.com. “I love seams, and I love dresses you can wear to work, but with hidden zippers for sex appeal. I also wanted people to see the emphasis on great tailoring; a great pant can go a really long way.”

Where to find it: For more information, visit www.531jerome.com.

Onda Asks Designers to Make a Difference

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Onda

Two years ago, Dossier editor Erin Dixon took a step away from the life of writing, editing, and consulting to take a seminar with nonprofit Safe Horizon. “[The focus] was about their work in shelters for women who had been in abusive home situations,” explained Dixon, noting that, oftentimes, the women who come to these shelters arrive with just the clothes on their back. The seminar also happened to coincide with New York fashion week. “It was an interesting contrast—but not necessarily a bad one,” she related. “It made me see things in a different light: There are so many tools within the industry that can be used to help people.”

And so were strewn the early seeds of Foundation Onda, a new nonprofit (named Onda—”wave” in Italian—to represent a positive ripple effect) that asks designers to donate surplus beauty and wellness supplies (e.g., gift bag extras like stray shampoos, lipsticks, or lotions that showgoers often leave behind) to Safe Horizon. This request did not fall on deaf ears—Donna Karan, Derek Lam, Narciso Rodriguez, and Ralph Rucci are just a few of the designers who have signed on to help.

Onda, which will launch during New York fashion week, asks only that participants donate a single item to its cause. “Obviously, we’re so happy to get more donations from a designer,” said Dixon, “but we’re also happy to get one donation. It’s about being in the moment and looking at something and saying, ‘Even if this one object just makes it a little bit better, it’s worth doing rather than doing nothing.’”

Some designers, however, are taking it a bit further, giving a scarf, an accessory, even ready-to-wear to Onda. “One of the things that the [representative] at Safe Horizon said to me was that women there, when they get items like this, really feel like they’re part of society again,” explained Dixon. “They’re part of the normal world. They’re not marginalized in this other subcategory. They’re joining the population. And that’s so exciting and beautiful.”

For more information, visit www.foundationonda.org.

Photo: Courtesy of Onda

Fringe With Benefits

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Fringe from Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs, and Sister by Sibling

Fringe, in every length, style, and color, has been adding a playful kick to the Spring ’14 collections. It surfaced early in NYC, namely at 3.1 Phillip Lim and Ralph Rucci. The former showed fringe on punctuated-block tops in Neapolitan hues, while the latter offered an evening gown tiered in fiber-optic strands that radiated with synthetic rainbow phosphorescence (“eyelashes,” Rucci called the textile).

At Rodarte, Kate and Laura Mulleavy paid homage to their beloved Los Angeles, attaching long tassels to trash-fab grommeted belts and heavy leather skirts. Proenza Schouler‘s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez whipped up a lattice-patterned overcoat in shredded fabric—scraps of which were dip-dyed crimson red, and Marc Jacobs enhanced his collection’s Victorian vibe via bunches of fluid thread (above, center). Meanwhile, Francisco Costa—who celebrated ten years at the helm of Calvin Klein—also implemented fringe on a number of sporty silhouettes (above, left), breathing a reinvigorated rawness into his famed streamlined aesthetic.

The trend has been spotted out of the gate in London, too. Sister by Sibling used drapery tassels on netted skirts (above, right), while Holly Fulton employed wispy stranding on topcoats at her seventies-influenced outing. Of the fringe effect, New York’s Fivestory owner Claire Distenfeld told Style.com, “Amazing elements from the past are back in full force, including fringe. As a romantic, I’m ready to embrace it.”

Photos: IndigitalImages.com

Fashion Stars

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Yesterday afternoon, leaders in the fields of fashion, beauty, and interior design braved the bitter cold to attend the Fashion Group International’s 16th annual Rising Star Awards. Held at Cipriani 42nd Street, the ceremony served to recognize the brightest emerging talents in a range of creative industries. Ralph Rucci, the event’s keynote speaker, kicked things off, joking that he was “happy to take a little vacation” from preparing his Fall 2013 collection. “You have to switch gears sometimes if you work in a profession where you’re seeking to beautify the planet,” he said. Paper magazine’s Mickey Boardman kept things light when he gave the Accessories Award to socialite-cum-handbag-designer Cornelia Guest. “Since I’m presenting accessories, I couldn’t decide if I should bring my Stella McCartney handbag on stage with me,” he laughed (in the end, he decided not to). Alexandra Mor took home the Fine Jewelry Award for her eponymous collection, which presenter Marion Fasel described as “the emeralds of my dreams.” And in the hypercompetitive retail category (Moda Operandi and Fivestory were among the nominees), Hayley Barna and Katia Beauchamp captured the award for their members-only beauty site, Birchbox.

The highly coveted womenswear awards (presented by Derek Lam) were won by Tia Cibani and Norman Ambrose (pictured with Lam above) for their respective lines. Tim Coppens received the Menswear Award, beating out Andy Hilfiger and Todd Snyder, and Meggan Crum and Mandy Tang were given the Karen Harvey Business Innovator Award for their site TheRunthrough, which connects fashion editors and stylists to product samples. “When we heard about this, there were major eighties dance moves going on in our office,” said Crum. And why not? The big winners deserve to disco.

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