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April 21 2014

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59 posts tagged "Rick Owens"

Adidas Announces Long-Term Partnership With Pharrell Williams

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Pharrell

Speculation surrounding the deal can finally be laid to rest. Today, Adidas announced a long-term partnership with Pharrell Williams. Rumors have been circulating for months, peaking when the artist performed at the Oscars wearing custom red Adidas sneakers and the brand’s black leather track jacket. Pharrell’s Earth-friendly textiles company, Bionic Yarn, will be used in some of the label’s collection.

“Working with a brand like Adidas is such an incredible opportunity,” Pharrell said in the statement. “From the classic track suit to growing up in Virginia wearing Stan Smiths, Adidas has been a staple in my life. Their pieces are timeless. This is an exciting partnership for both me and Bionic Yarn.”

Dirk Schonberger, global creative director for Adidas Sport Style, had this to say: “I am truly thrilled to work with Pharrell. He is a pop culture icon that never fails to inspire, not just through his musical talent and craft, but through his many other interests. He is the perfect fit for the multifaceted company that is Adidas.”

With both Kanye West and Pharrell now officially signed on, along with Raf Simons, Rick Owens, and other designers, it seems Adidas is on a mission to be the coolest sportswear brand on the planet, one collaboration at a time.

The first offerings from the adidas Originals x Pharrell Williams collection will be available this summer.

Photo: Getty ImagesĀ 

Diane Pernet Loves Film, Fashion, and Zoolander

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diane-pernetFashion film is a curious genre. Oftentimes, the Style.com team is confronted with the typical pitch: a short little flick featuring haunting indie music, a pensive-looking model, a vintage bohemian ambiance, and, of course, a new collection. Sure, there are great ones (as evidenced by our Video Fashion Week series, which wrapped today), but more often than not, they’re cheesy and lacking in both plot and substance. However, according to former designer, renowned journalist, and A Shaded View on Fashion Film Festival founder Diane Pernet, this breed of cinematography is not fashion film at all. “Just because you’ve used a movie camera doesn’t mean you’ve made a film,” Pernet told Style.com. And she would know. Having launched her famed Paris-based festival in 2008 (it gets its name from her blog, A Shaded View on Fashion), Pernet now sorts through more than five hundred cinematic submissions each year before curating the lineup of films to be shown (and judged) during her grand event. As you can imagine, she’s seen the bad, the terrible, but also the spectacular.

Last weekend, thanks to a little help from the French Institute Alliance Française and Kering, Pernet brought New York its first taste of ASVOFF. She screened the festival’s greatest hits by the likes of Bruce Weber, Ellen von Unwerth, and Mike Figgis with the hopes of inspiring and enlightening her stateside fans. There was no competition element this time around, but Pernet, who’s as well known for her marvelously outré noir uniform as for her widespread work in sartorial cinema, hinted that she hopes to bring the full-fledged festival to the Big Apple next year. Also on her docket? The launch of a trio of perfumes, which debut on Style.com’s Beauty Counter this afternoon. Here, Pernet talks to Style.com about the role of fashion film, her frustration with runway shows, and why fashion flicks are so rarely taken seriously.

Oftentimes, fashion film is not taken seriously. Why do you think that is?

I think the reason it’s not taken seriously is that a lot of fashion photographers making films aren’t filmmakers. It’s their agents who are telling them, “You’d better get a video camera and you’d better make a film because that’s where it’s at.” And a film director has to think of so many different elements that you don’t think about in a frozen image. So a big problem is that some fashion photographers have a hard time making the segue. Of course, there are people who have made a nice entry, like Bruce Weber or Ellen von Unwerth who have been doing it for over a decade, or newer people like Steven Meisel, Steven Klein, and Inez & Vinoodh. But a lot of photographers are just making fashion photo shoots that move. That’s not a film. It’s a fashion shoot in motion and that’s not interesting. Not interesting to me, anyway.

A lot of fashion films that we see are almost a parody of themselves, with the indie music, the “deep in thought” models, the vintage vibe…With that in mind, what does it take to make a compelling fashion film?

I always use this as an example because it’s something everybody knows: A Therapy, Roman Polanski’s 2012 film for Prada. That’s an excellent fashion film. I personally like a narrative. I think you need a narrative if you’re going to hold somebody’s interest for three minutes. CO’s She Said, She Said [2013] by Stuart Blumberg, which won best acting in my festival, is a great example. It had a wonderful story. After my festival at Centre Pompidou, I got an e-mail from a digital person at LVMH that said, “Now that is a great way to show fashion.” Fashion film is not about just selling the product—it’s about creating an atmosphere. It’s a story. A great fashion film needs the same criteria as a feature film. Does it take you somewhere? Does it have some kind of emotion? And humor is always great. People in fashion need humor.

Does it upset you that so many brands are dubbing these moving photo shoots “fashion films”?

I get about five hundred submissions [for my festival] every year, and an awful lot are in that category. I think people still don’t have a grip on what a fashion film is—they still believe that if someone’s moving in front of the camera, it’s a film. So that’s a little depressing, but it’s getting better. People are starting to realize that it’s not about, like, here’s the shoe, here’s the dress, here’s this. It’s not an animated lookbook, for God’s sake. It’s a film.

Do you think that fashion film can stand on its own as an art form, or will its primary purpose always be to showcase a product?

I think it can stand on its own. There are a lot of fashion films that are made by actual filmmakers that are not just about a product, even when it is for a product. We have to move away from [product-centric fashion films] because they’re not very interesting. You want something that’s going to make you think. It’s just not about being pretty—it’s got to be more than that.

You were really the first major champion of fashion film. How did you come to be so passionate about it?

Well, my background is in film. That’s what I have my degree in, and I’ve always loved film and I’ve always loved fashion. I think from the first Walt Disney movie I saw in a drive-in, the fantasy of films just captured me. And as far as clothing, I was a designer for thirteen years. I think the real seed of it, though, was planted when I moved to Paris at the end of 1990. My first job was working on a feature film as a costume designer, and I realized how directors are really afraid of fashion. Of course, some directors, like David Lynch and Peter Greenaway, got it. But most are afraid that the fashions are going to take too much importance. But really, fashion is supporting the character, and it can be very subtle. Most directors just don’t understand fashion or they don’t give it the credit that it really warrants. That really made me think about the relationship between fashion and film.

Do you think the fact that directors like Martin Scorsese and Wes Anderson, who have made films for Dolce & Gabbana and Prada, respectively, have elevated the practice to higher regard?

Absolutely. That’s why we like to always have one of our films presented at Cannes because we want more directors like that to be involved. I just met Alejandro Jodorowsky’s son, Adan Jodorowsky, who made this incredible film, The Voice Thief [2013], with Asia Argento. We’re going to put it in the next edition of ASVOFF. I want to always raise the bar, and I want more real directors. I think that’s important.

Do you think that something originally pegged as a fashion film could evolve into something that ends up being a mainstream feature?

Yeah, I hope so. I’d love that. And why not? Take Wes Anderson. I haven’t seen The Grand Budapest Hotel yet. But I think there are directors whose features you can call fashion films. We had William Klein two years ago as a special guest, and that film, Who Are You, Polly Maggoo? [1996], was a fashion film. Or what about Zoolander [2001]? I love Zoolander. That’s a fashion film. I thought it was really interesting. And I love some documentaries, like the one on Diana Vreeland, The Eye Has to Travel [2011]. I loved that film. I thought it was really inspiring.

How do fashion films make us look at garments differently than a fashion photograph or a runway show does?

Fashion films are a dream. They’re all about desire. You’re seeing the garment in 3-D. I love a frozen image, too, so I’m not against print. I think there’s a value to that, and they can be something really beautiful. Fashion films are just another way to show fashion—not the only way. I’m not saying that fashion films are going to take over runway shows, because they’ve always been the most efficient way to show fashion, even though now, I think, for the most part they look pretty last century. I don’t think that will change right away.

Do you think it should change? Should we move away from runway shows?

I’d be happier to see more films and installations. I think so many fashion shows shouldn’t even happen. You spend so much time going from one end [of a city] to the other just to see things walking up and down the runway. If you’re going to take us somewhere, like Alexander McQueen used to or like [John] Galliano did in his day, or sometimes other designers like Rick Owens or Haider Ackermann do, there’s something special and emotional about a show. There’s a mood. But I don’t see that a lot anymore. I’ve talked to Rick Owens about this, and he likes the “tribe” experience of a show, but if you ask me, the main point of a lot of these fashion shows now is just to see who’s sitting in what row. I mean, who cares? I think they’re not necessary.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Adidas x Raf Simons Returns for Spring

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Adidas x Raf SimonsNot to be outdone by the Nike + R.T. Air Force 1 Riccardo Tisci collab, Adidas is unleashing another round of Raf Simons kicks for spring.

Building on the initial Fall 2013 collection that included just three styles of performance runners, this drop includes a whole slew of new unisex models—eight to be exact, each in up to four different colorways. Blending classic three-stripe silhouettes like on the Stan Smith with new tech and exaggerated shapes, bright colors and flashy patterns, the lineup looks like a footwear collection designed for a gang of very fashionable superheroes.

The brand is establishing itself as the go-to for designers looking to experiment with sneakers, and Simons is in good company at Adidas, where Rick Owens, Jeremy Scott, and Mark McNairy also have ongoing collections. Based on what we saw during fashion season—both Chanel and Dior had trainers on their couture runways—the trend will only continue to gain momentum.

Adidas x Raf Simons prices range from $440 to $570. The collection arrives soon at Adidas Originals concept stores, boutiques, and retailers carrying RAF.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

FIT Unzips the Story Behind the Moto Jacket

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Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket

“We had to start with the basics,” explained FIT graduate student and curator Kristen Haggerty. She’s talking about the origins of the university’s just-launched exhibition, Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket, a study of the motorcycle jacket’s evolution from a utilitarian Schott Bros. basic, to a symbol of post-WWII rebellion, to the modern-day fashion staple. “The first Perfecto was made in 1928 and was sold by Harley-Davidson—it’s really what everyone thinks of when they think of a biker jacket,” said Haggerty, gesturing to a 1980 replica of the late twenties belted classic with an exposed zipper. “Yes, it’s a very stylish garment, but every one of those elements means something.”

Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket

The show, which opens with an in-depth examination of the iconic Perfecto, combines documentary photography, press clippings, and a tightly curated collection of original pieces to shed light on the now 80-some-year history of the moto. Wares by Helmut Lang, Rick Owens, and a particularly memorable tutu moto jacket from Comme des Garçons’ Spring 2005 outing display the many ways in which fashion designers have appropriated and interpreted the garment. “Over the years, the Perfecto became something much more than a utilitarian biker jacket,” Haggerty told Style.com. “There were times when it was pretty subversive. Modern designers [have also] really gone above and beyond. It’s a garment that can exist in two different places at the same time, and have meaning for both of them.” All one needs to do is browse a rack at Versace, Chloé, Balmain, or Saint Laurent to see what she’s talking about. The exhibition, however, will help you understand and, dare we say, appreciate it.

Beyond Rebellion will be on view at The Museum at FIT, Tuesdays through Fridays, through April 5.

Photos: Courtesy of The Museum at FIT

Scads of Supermodels (and Harry Brant, too) on Day 3 of PFW

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Model Mania

We can always count on Paris for high-wattage casts, but we never expected to see so many supermodels this early in the week. None other than Gisele Bündchen kicked things off today by closing Balenciaga (the last time she set foot on a runway was Alexander Wang’s Fall ’12 show two years ago), where she was notably joined by familiar faces Mariacarla Boscono and Natasha Poly. Several hours later, Balmain continued to raise the bar with a lineup full of A-listers, including Angela Lindvall, Anja Rubik, Emily DiDonato, Izabel Goulart, and closer Rosie Huntington-Whiteley (who also walked in the label’s Spring show). Compared to those all-stars, the other major girls in the mix—Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, Jourdan Dunn, and Edie Campbell—all but faded into the background. And then leave it to Rick Owens to throw a wrench into the works. Following his step dancers last season, the designer turned heads again by interspersing old-school veterans such as Kirsten Owen and Diana Dondoe with real, mature women (many of whom, we’re happy to say, were not sample size). But this was no street-casting job. Rather, Owens’s casting directors, Angus Munro and Noah Shelley, told Style.com that “most of the ‘women’ were part of the Owens organization.” Owens kept it fresh by keeping it in the family. Speaking of keeping it in the family, we were pleasantly surprised to see Harry Brant follow supermodel mom Stephanie Seymour when he made his runway debut at IRFE. Sadly, his older brother, Peter Brant Jr., didn’t make the cut. There’s always next season, Peter.

Photos: IndigitalImages.com; Getty Images