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July 22 2014

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46 posts tagged "Roberto Cavalli"

The Split-Second Preview: Roberto Cavalli

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The Fall ’14 Ready-to-Wear collections are under way in Milan, and will be followed by the shows in Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

Roberto Cavalli Preview

WHO: Roberto Cavalli

WHERE: Milan

WHEN: Saturday, February 22

WHAT: “Feathers and embroideries dance on the evening flapper dress of the Cavalli woman, who by day dons a military Neo-Chivalry style.” — Roberto Cavalli. The designer sent us a Fall ’14 detail shot, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Roberto Cavalli

The Split-Second Preview: Just Cavalli

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The Fall ’14 Ready-to-Wear collections are under way in Milan, and will be followed by the shows in Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

Just Cavalli

WHO: Just Cavalli, designed by Roberto Cavalli

WHERE: Milan

WHEN: Thursday, February 20

WHAT: “Fall ’14 focuses on the inestimable value of the Florentine Renaissance’s artistic patrimony through the lens of my contemporary vision.” — Roberto Cavalli. The designer sent us a Fall ’14 sketch, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Just Cavalli

The Split-Second Preview: Roberto Cavalli

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The Fall ’14 menswear collections are under way in Milan, and will be followed by the shows in Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

Roberto Cavalli preview

WHO: Roberto Cavalli

WHERE: Milan

WHEN: Tuesday, January 14

WHAT: “A study of the romantic and the raw, which re-imagines the original philosophies of Roberto Cavalli menswear and the classic aesthetics. “—Roberto Cavalli. The designer sent us a trio of Fall ’14 inspiration images, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli: Young at Heart, and Always Colorful

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Roberto Cavalli

Techno beats were blaring during a noon meeting at Roberto Cavalli’s Fifth Avenue offices on Wednesday. Sure, it was a little early for the unst unst of dance music, but what else would one expect from the man who not only outfits but also helped define the aesthetic of the party-ready jet set when he launched his line of vibrant, sexed-up designs in the seventies? Cavalli, 73, was in town this week to fete the 5,650-square-foot Soho flagship for his more youthful Just Cavalli range (below). Naturally, the new digs, which opened to the public in October, were celebrated with a lively bash last night. But the store isn’t the designer’s only new venture—he’s bowing a Cavalli Club in Miami next year, and, in addition to designing Just Cavalli and his more luxurious main line, he’s pushing his own brands of vodka and red wine. It’s all part of Cavalli’s ever-evolving role as a businessman—rather than a strict fashion creative—a transition he accepts but also laments. Ahead of yesterday evening’s festivities, Cavalli sat down with Style.com for a candid chat about why New Yorkers wear black, how he hates being copied, and what it means to be sexy.

Why did you launch Just Cavalli in the first place?
Sometimes people call Just Cavalli a second line. It’s not my second line. It’s a line for the young. Before I [launched] Just Cavalli, I started to see how many people around me were copying me. There was Cavalli style all over, and I said, “Why am I giving so many opportunities to other people? Maybe I should just start to copy myself.” So I started Just Cavalli to copy myself. But slowly, I began to love Just Cavalli very much. I was able to make Roberto Cavalli more chic, more sophisticated, and more about the red carpet—more glamorous. I love Just Cavalli because it’s young. I’m not a young man, but in my mind, I’m very young. I like to go to the disco, and I like to see beautiful girls.

When most people think of New York fashion, visions of black-clad women pop into their heads. But your designs are colorful, vibrant, and full of print. How do you feel Cavalli clothes relate to a New York audience?
Oh, please. New York became like that because everyone wants to look skinnier. Black is the color people wear when they’re gym fanatics. And it’s true, if you wear black, you look at least five kilos less than what you are. I do it myself. I was relatively fat many years ago, and I started to dress myself in black all the time. I know why I dressed in black—to look thin. But black is negative, it’s not positive. And it’s a little more American. I think designers who are Italian or French are more colorful. But I do love the Japanese fashion. Japanese fashion is black and gray, but it’s wow. It’s harmony. I adore that.

Why are you so drawn to color?
My fashion is colorful because I love life. I wake up in the morning, I open the window over where I live on a wonderful hill in Florence, I see the sun, and in the springtime I love to see the first peach flowers that are kind of white and a bit pink. And then I feel like I want to put out something colorful. I don’t follow fashion, I follow my feelings, and my clothes have a lot to do with my mood. And I think that should be the case with every woman—every woman should be the designer. And every woman should understand that if you are a little bit colorful, you can show your happiness to your boyfriend.

Just Cavalli

Do you feel that Americans have very different tastes compared to European women?
Yes, because [American women] trust designers like Michael Kors. He’s one of the biggest copy designers in the world. I just want to tell him to stop copying me! Stop! All the time I write those comments on Instagram. He copies everybody! And Americans like Michael Kors! And you love so many other designers who do that—he’s not American fashion. He is international fashion made in America. It’s not fair. The American women, they all dress the same.

Maybe if New Yorkers wore a bit more color, we wouldn’t have a reputation for being so chilly.
Don’t be silly. New Yorkers aren’t chilly. I’ve met so many American women who are warm and romantic and so charming. But American women, in my opinion, have to be a little bit more open-minded.

What do you think it means to be sexy today, and how has that changed throughout the course of your career?
I started out making very sexy clothes because I [launched my line] after minimalism. And sexy had a lot to do with my success, because after minimalism, every woman wished to be a woman, to be feminine. But the line between sexy and vulgar was very thin. And to be sexy and not to be vulgar, you need to have a very good fashion sense. Today, I don’t think fashion should be sexy because women have become more mature. They understand that they can be sexy just by speaking with their eyes. To be sexy, you don’t need to show your body. In my opinion, it’s much more sexy when a woman is covered. I’m a man. I love to be able to fantasize. I think we should transform the word sexy to sensual because it’s more modern. Sensual is glamorous. Sexy is not.

Has your approach to design and your role as a fashion designer changed since you opened your house in the seventies?
Of course it’s changed. I don’t know how I’ve changed, but I know why. Today I feel I have more responsibility. Today I have people working for me, and I know that I cannot be so arrogant in fashion like I used to be. Before, I’d say, “I’ll do what I want!” Today, no. My dream is to make one fashion show where people say, “Roberto’s getting crazy!” Before, I was a little bit more natural—and by that I mean crazy.

What’s next for the Cavalli brand?
What I’m working very hard on now is the Cavalli Club [in Miami], because it’s completely one world—music, fashion, movies. It’s all a part of our life. It’s very difficult to understand this Cavalli world in the States, because Americans are more sensitive to their ideas than European ideas. I remember before, America was the number-one place to appreciate things made in Italy or made in France. Now, they love everything made in China. It’s an evolution I accept, but I would like to be stronger, and more famous in America. It’s a big challenge, but you’ll see. You will love my fashion and you will love my store, and when you see my Just Cavalli pieces, you’ll think next summer, when you’re in Saint-Tropez, you’ll want to wear this kind of thing. And you will feel very sexy.

Photo: Steve Eichner ; Courtesy of Just Cavalli

Runway to Red Carpet: Art Basel’s Fashionable Fetes and a Few High-Low Mash-ups

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Kate MiddletonWhile Art Basel Miami Beach is technically an art show, it’s best known for being a place where the fashion, art, and celebrity sets collide to rage all week long. The party circuit kicked into full gear on Wednesday night with a host of soirees, including dinners hosted by Louis Vuitton and Swarovski that brought out notables such as supermodels Karolina Kurkova and Cindy Crawford. The latter chose a Roberto Cavalli body-con dress patterned with baroque swirls and a tweed print for the Vuitton fete, while Kurkova opted for a red long-sleeve David Koma Fall ’13 dress with nude mesh detailing on the neckline and sleeves at the Swarovski dinner. The following day, Louis Vuitton’s Fall campaign face, Michelle Williams, donned a full Vuitton look for the brand’s beach barbecue, layering a navy sweater over a red-and-white striped dress.

Across the pond, Kate Middleton mixed highs and lows on the red carpet, pairing a sparkling Zara necklace with a cream long-sleeve Roland Mouret gown at Thursday’s royal premiere of Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom in London. As the credits rolled, the Duchess of Cambridge joined Nelson Mandela’s daughters and the film’s cast and crew in paying tribute to the revolutionary leader, who passed as the film was being screened.

On Tuesday, Keira Knightley made a return to the red carpet for London’s Serious Fun gala, stepping out in a dress we’ve seen her in several times before—including at her wedding this past spring. For this outing, she added sheer sleeves with embroidery at the wrists and neckline to make it more appropriate for the city’s chilly weather.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: Dave J Hogan / Getty Images