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August 21 2014

styledotcom .@VanityFair looks at celeb style transformation from off-duty to red carpet: stylem.ag/1ljwxPA pic.twitter.com/tT0p2qP9GE

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19 posts tagged "Rosie Huntington-Whiteley"

Hot Dogs: 10 Beautiful Models Posing With Pups on Instagram

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They say a dog is a man’s best friend, but here at Style.com, we think the phrase should be “model’s best friend.” From Bar Refaeli and her fluffy pup, Pucci, to Hilary Rhoda and her tiny Chihuahua, Chloe, models everywhere are taking to Instagram to show us that being photogenic definitely runs in the family. Jessica Hart’s Yorkshire terrier, Floyd, even has his own Instagram account with more than 2,500 dedicated followers. This week we’ve rounded up the 10 best ‘grams of models with cute canines for your viewing pleasure. Fluffy content? You betcha. But hey, we are in the dog days of summer.

1. Alana Zimmer

2. Ashleigh Good

3. Drake Burnette

4. Hilary Rhoda

5. Anja Rubik

6. Jessica Hart

7. Taylor Hill

8. Bar Refaeli

9. Kate Upton

10. Rosie Huntington-Whiteley

Dressing for Fame: Cher Coulter on Navigating the Red-Carpet Game and One Model’s Enviable Wardrobe

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Cher Coulter and Elizabeth OlsenWith an impressive CV that includes stints working backstage at fashion shows for the likes of Alexander McQueen and Hermès when she was just 14, as well as a degree in fashion design from London’s Central Saint Martins, Cher Coulter is a rare breed of fashion stylist. The deeply passionate Coulter has cultivated a portfolio of scene-stealing looks and a uniquely cool aesthetic among her coterie of clients that includes such A-listers as Nicole Richie, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, and Elizabeth Olsen. Coulter took a break from her busy schedule to talk to Style.com about what happens if she disagrees with a client, the stylist who continues to inspire her, and whose wardrobe she’d like to steal.

Why did you start styling?
For me, I think it goes hand in hand with design. When I first moved [to L.A.], I actually came out here with clothing designs of things I had been selling in London, and I just fell into styling. But after I graduated from Saint Martins, I did both. It’s all fashion, and the more qualified in the more areas you can be, the better.

When did you feel as though you’d made it?
I don’t know if you ever do. But I remember when I first went on a press tour with Orlando [Bloom] for Pirates of the Caribbean and thinking, Oh, God, this is a really big deal, being in the same room as people like Johnny Depp. I also won a Hollywood Stylist Award a couple of years ago, and I felt like that was good to get recognized. But sometimes I think, Oh, my God, have I lost it? Am I losing it? That’s the thing with fashion, it’s very up and down. You’ve got to maintain credibility. You’ve got to keep fashionable, haven’t you?

How do you balance what the client wants and what you want for the client?
You’ve always got to do what the client wants ultimately. I think as long as you feel as though you’ve had some sort of creative input, there’s compromise all along the way. Even if you’re doing an editorial, there’s compromise—you’ve got to use advertisers, you’ve got to do this, you’ve got to do that. Unless you have your own blog, it’s never 100 percent you.

Do you ever disagree with the client on a look?
I’m pretty obvious when I don’t like something. Sometimes there are too many choices, and I’ll be like, “Look and see these pictures and sleep on it and wake up in the morning and see what your gut reaction is. What leapt out more to you in the night? What dress does your mind keep going to?” That’s a really good test. But there have been a couple of times when people have worn things that weren’t my first choice. But ultimately, I’ve pulled all the clothes. Normally, what can sometimes happen is that I just want it to be even more fashion, and at the end of the day, sometimes the person wearing it is like, “Well, you aren’t the one who has to walk out there and be up for criticism.” That’s why I never push someone into doing something they don’t want to do, because it will backfire…and then they’ll just hate me.

Do you prefer editorial work or red carpet?
I think variety is the spice of life, and ultimately you need to do a little bit of everything. I like to do an ad job as well when there are parameters where they might say to you, “We just want white swimsuits.” And then what you do is focus in on white swimsuits and you have to find the best swimsuits. I like research. But then I also like working with a brand like J Brand. I worked on their Pre-Fall collection. I like going in there and getting into the designer’s head and aesthetic and then looking at the real subtleties in that collection and styling it. I like that as much as working with a celebrity on the red carpet.

What do you think is the most underrated part of your job?
How much work goes into the prep. I don’t think anybody ever gets that. I can spend two days solid on Style.com looking for gowns. Of course, I’ll start with the designers that I like the most and I’ll put those all into files. And then I send those to each PR and they’ll say, “I don’t have this, this, and this.” So then I’ll say, “Well, what do you have?” It’s such a back-and-forth with each designer. And what’s really important to me is to make sure there’s representation from the client’s favorite designers. So maybe I can’t get the Stella dress, but I got you these Stella pieces instead. They need to know that I’ve approached everybody.

When clients have brand partnerships or act as ambassadors, does that make the job easier or more challenging?
It’s better. And I am part of getting to that place. I encourage someone to go to [the designer's] show, I encourage them to go to any event they do. I think that’s all very important. Designers become close with celebrities, and I think ultimately you can get pushed out as a stylist because they forge friendships and stuff. But you’re also the person who has the objective view and can be a third eye.

Are there any stylists who inspire you?
So many stylists are great. I think Camilla Nickerson is the one. Her attention to detail is amazing. She’s worked hard, she gets to work with the best photographers, she gets the best clothes, but she’ll always put them together with really good flavor. I like how her work isn’t just straightforward pretty. There’s always something out there about it, and the details are spot-on. I think she’s brilliant.

If you could swap style or wardrobes with one client, who would it be?
Rosie [Huntington-Whiteley]. I’d swap wardrobes with her because she has the most insane wardrobe. She has the most amazing vintage, the most amazing Isabel Marant. She has every girl’s dream wardrobe.

Photo: Roger Kisby/Getty Images

The Week in Look of the Day Winners Chosen by You: Americana Fashion, Fall’s Best New Sunglasses, Models-Off-Duty, and More

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Look of the dayWhat was on Style.com editors’ minds this week? After celebrating Memorial Day (along with the rest of our U.S. readers), we paid tribute to the national holiday with our Look of the Day poll on Tuesday, rounding up our favorite girls rocking American flag motifs. In the end, you voted for Kate Bosworth wearing a stars-and-stripes tank top with cutoffs at Coachella, but Rosie Huntington-Whiteley’s bikini cover-up (those stems!) was a close runner-up. Now that sunny summer days have finally arrived, we mined the recent runways for some new sunglasses inspiration. Your top pick? Tom Ford’s visor-like shades, as seen on Kati Nescher backstage at the designer’s Fall ’14 show. Keeping our eyes on the streets, Thursday’s LOTD highlighted out models-off-duty (including Joan Smalls and winner Chanel Iman) wrapping shirts and jackets around their waists. And with Resort season ramping up next week, we used the opportunity to call out some of the coolest bomber jackets spotted in the new collections.

Click here for a slideshow of the looks that won your Look of the Day votes this week—and a few runners-up for good measure.

Scads of Supermodels (and Harry Brant, too) on Day 3 of PFW

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Model Mania

We can always count on Paris for high-wattage casts, but we never expected to see so many supermodels this early in the week. None other than Gisele Bündchen kicked things off today by closing Balenciaga (the last time she set foot on a runway was Alexander Wang’s Fall ’12 show two years ago), where she was notably joined by familiar faces Mariacarla Boscono and Natasha Poly. Several hours later, Balmain continued to raise the bar with a lineup full of A-listers, including Angela Lindvall, Anja Rubik, Emily DiDonato, Izabel Goulart, and closer Rosie Huntington-Whiteley (who also walked in the label’s Spring show). Compared to those all-stars, the other major girls in the mix—Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, Jourdan Dunn, and Edie Campbell—all but faded into the background. And then leave it to Rick Owens to throw a wrench into the works. Following his step dancers last season, the designer turned heads again by interspersing old-school veterans such as Kirsten Owen and Diana Dondoe with real, mature women (many of whom, we’re happy to say, were not sample size). But this was no street-casting job. Rather, Owens’s casting directors, Angus Munro and Noah Shelley, told Style.com that “most of the ‘women’ were part of the Owens organization.” Owens kept it fresh by keeping it in the family. Speaking of keeping it in the family, we were pleasantly surprised to see Harry Brant follow supermodel mom Stephanie Seymour when he made his runway debut at IRFE. Sadly, his older brother, Peter Brant Jr., didn’t make the cut. There’s always next season, Peter.

Photos: IndigitalImages.com; Getty Images

Grace Gives London a New LBD

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Grace

Erik Torstensson and Jens Grede did not go small with the launch of their new label, Grace, last night in London. The duo, who founded the creative agency Saturday Group, as well as the denim line Frame, unveiled a capsule collection of little black dresses in a salon-style show at the opulent Grill Room of the Café Royal. Katie Grand styled; Rosie Huntington-Whiteley modeled, among others. Sophia Hesketh was in attendance and whisked one of the dresses off the runway, such as it was, to wear to a party later that night. A big part of the appeal, Grede hypothesized, was the very basic-ness of the looks. “We want to keep prices down, and we want the dresses to be in good fabrics and made well, so that means they have to be pared down in other ways,” he explained. “But I also think, those simpler things, that’s often what women are missing in their wardrobes.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo