Style.com

July 23 2014

styledotcom The @FiftyShades director went inside Coco Chanel's apartment. There were no whips, though. stylem.ag/1yYYWNl pic.twitter.com/N1lKWfgMgm

Subscribe to Style Magazine
23 posts tagged "Ryan McGinley"

Marina’s Must-Haves: Adam McEwen’s Pink Print

-------

Adam McEwen

On my wish list today is a print by British artist Adam McEwen. This work is part of charity ACRIA’s Unframed auction, which aims to raise funds for HIV research. Starting today, you can log on to Paddle8.com and bid on a selection of artworks curated by Ales Ortuzar. The auction, which includes items from artists like Ryan McGinley, KAWS, and Mark Flood will close at ACRIA’s benefit on April 9. Will you help support the cause?

Adam McEwen’s Untitled, 2014, inkjet printed sponge mounted on an aluminum panel, 38 1/4 x 28 3/8 inches (97 x 72 cm). Bid now at Paddle8.com.

EXCLUSIVE: Olivia Kim Brings Brite Lites, and Plenty of Gifts, to Nordstrom

-------

Olivia Kim's product selection for Nordstrom

“Not many retailers are willing to disrupt their business,” said Nordstrom’s director of creative projects, Olivia Kim. “But Nordstrom is, and to me, that’s what makes this job so fun and exciting.”

Kim, the former VP of creative at Opening Ceremony, has now graduated to her second full-fledged pop-in installation at the behemoth department store, where she injects equal parts cuteness, quirk, and novelty. Aptly titled 4U: Brite Lites_Gift City, the pop-in, as Kim put it, is “Santa’s Workshop for the twenty-second century.”

“I wanted the design to be cold, austere, and metallic, but referential to holiday,” she said. To help bring her vision to life, Kim solicited the help of her dear friend Rafael de Cárdenas of Rafael de Cárdenas Ltd. / Architecture at Large. “He and I have this incredibly in-tune sense of environment,” she proclaimed. It’s a creative partnership that goes back to her time in New York.

As for the concept behind the staggering high-low product selection, Kim considered, “What do you get someone who has everything?” She wanted to offer those hard-to-find discoveries—and she’s succeeded. The democratically priced range of gifts includes Keith Haring skis by Bomber Ski, charity RxArt’s collaborative gifts designed by notable artists like Ryan McGinley, Vanessa Arizaga jewelry, tomes from Abrams Books, Illesteva eyewear, black-out Bamford Rolexes, Chinti and Parker knits, and much more.

Brite Lites_Gift City is the next step in an overarching plan for Nordstrom, where Kim has worked since early 2013. She aims to educate, engage, and inspire Nordstrom’s large customer base by introducing plenty of buzz-worthy merchandise. “I want to be able to create something sexy, and I want people to get excited about shopping again,” she explained.

But are customers responding in kind? “Yes,” Kim confirmed with confidence. “It’s exciting for us as a brand to be able to say we’ve got a customer who is interested in niche products and young designers. I’m here to take risks. I’m here to push something new and adventurous in front of the company, and in front of our customers.”

4U: Brite Lites_Gift City will be open at twelve Nordstrom locations nationwide beginning November 15. Merchandise will also be available online at www.nordstrom.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Nordstrom

Olivier Zahm Keeps It Simple for UNIQLO

-------

Ryan McGinley and Chloe Sevigny for UNIQLO

Everyone knows that if you want to up your “cool” factor, you bring in Olivier Zahm. This strategy was not lost on UNIQLO, who appointed the Purple Diary editor as visual director for its newest campaign. Lensed by art-world darling Ryan McGinley, the ads spotlight the brand’s significantly broadened silk and cashmere range (think 330 colorways and patterns for him and her), which is available from today in stores and online. Chloë Sevigny, Lily Donaldson, and McGinley himself don UNIQLO’s latest wares while posing against simple pastel backgrounds—a visual approach that Zahm felt would convey both the simplicity and sensuality of the materials. Catch the ads’ debut here, exclusively on Style.com.

Fashion’s Latest Emissary From The Fountain of Youth

-------

Dairy InstertStyle.com contributing editor and party reporter Darrell Hartman circles the city and, occasionally, the globe in the line of duty. In a regular column, he reports on the topics—whatever they may be at whatever given moment—that are stirring the social set.

Carlos Souza and Dorian Grinspan“Yes, the lad was premature,” goes a line from The Picture of Dorian Gray. “He was gathering his harvest while it was yet spring.”

I doubt I’m the first person who has, upon meeting Dorian Grinspan, thought of Oscar Wilde’s fable about precious youth. This Dorian is real. The 20-year-old founder and editor Out of Order magazine, he’s been sowing his seeds early—and some of the fashion world’s biggest influencers are taking notice.

Grinspan was born in Paris and came to the U.S. to study at Yale. But while an earlier generation might’ve chosen to wait for a diploma before launching into the world, Grinspan didn’t see the point. “I didn’t come [to the U.S.] wanting to do a magazine. I arrived at Yale and I was really, really bored,” he told Women’s Wear Daily. [Full disclosure: this reporter spent four years at Yale, and did not find it boring.] Grinspan will start his senior year in the Fall, majoring in American Studies, but he recently took an apartment in New York, and says that thanks to some Franco-esque schedule jiggering will be spending just three days a week in New Haven.

Youth these days! Grinspan is already a darling of the industry. WWD is only one of several publications to anoint him an up-and-comer, and his biannual is already carried by the likes of Opening Ceremony and Colette, and the second issue, which Grinspan launched last week, boasts the sort of top-shelf contributors of which many start-up outlets dream. Among the photo credits and profile subjects are Larry Clark, Ryan McGinley, and Olivier Theyskens. These are gets worth bragging about, even if Grinspan is modest, or at least PR-savvy, enough not to. “It’s actually funny to see how accessible these people are and how much they want to help,” he told me at last week’s launch party at Fivestory, an uptown boutique. (His fashion-model looks—literally, as in repped by DNA—aren’t the reason, but surely they can’t hurt.) Gus Van Sant, he added, had been “really interested, and we almost shot something,” but the scheduling hadn’t worked out.

Grinspan has plenty more influential supporters, including fellow editors. “Stephen Gan has been amazing to me,” he said. And after meeting Stefano Tonchi at a party in Cannes last year, Grinspan appeared in W this spring. Starting in the fall, he said, he’ll be writing for the magazine’s website. Quick work. For a moment, Grinspan did pay some dues—as an intern for Carine Roitfeld. Among the people met while working there was photographer Michael Avedon, who shot a story for the new issue. (Avedon is just a year older than Grinspan, and the great-grandson of Richard.)

Grinspan holds himself well—and tends to do so in the right company. Cynthia Rowley, who hosted an after-party of sorts for the magazine at her boutique-cum-sweet-shop, Curious, couldn’t exactly remember how she’d first met him. She was pretty sure his boyfriend had interned at her husband’s gallery. In any case, Rowley said, she’d gotten to know him through “the Brant kids.”

How has Grinspan done it, in an industry with fewer and fewer footholds for young talent? “I don’t think there’s a secret. I feel like everything is so circumstantial,” he explained. When pressed, he added, “Both my mom and my dad have a lot of connections in fashion, I guess.” His mother, a graphic designer, got him interested in clothes and style early on. His father, a lawyer, worked “for a long time” with BCBG. And there’s his godmother, Numéro editor–in-chief Babette Djian. “She’s been great,” Grinspan admits. “We go to fashion shows together if we both have an invite. But I would never call her up and say, ‘Please take me to Jean Paul Gaultier!’ That’s not what I want our relationship to be.”

If things keep going the way they’re going, the occasional missing invite won’t be an issue. And why shouldn’t they? Grinspan has a way about him, evident in the manner in which he politely escorted Clark up the stairs at Rowley’s party and posed with him for photos. Clark, like Rowley, couldn’t recall how he and Grinspan had first started talking, but he did remember meeting Grinspan face to face. “He’s very enthusiastic, but not overbearing at all—just a nice young man,” he said. And one more likely to make a splash than all the others.

Put A Bird In It

-------

“The first time I worked with animals was a large brown bear that stood up on its back legs and ate a gummy bear out of my mouth, giving me a big sloppy kiss,” photographer Ryan McGinley tells Style.com. “I’ve loved working with animals ever since.”

His latest animal fixation? Birds. After his Animals exhibition closed at New York’s Team Gallery just last month, McGinley’s got another pet project out—this time, it’s the Fall 2012 “Birds of Prey” ad campaign for Bono and Ali Hewson’s Edun clothing line. To play up the collection’s graphic knits and jungle-inspired prints, the photographer enlisted a cast of five birds to star in the images alongside models Zen Sevastyanova, Grace Bol, and Miles McMillan (pictured, left). “I love the mix of taking something wild and unpredictable into this very controlled studio environment,” McGinley, who recently took a trip to Africa with Bono and Hewson to meet the people contributing to the Edun designs, says. “The organized chaos is a general theme I’m interested in.” As for whether it was more organized or chaos, he adds, “The birds on this shoot always had a little sense of danger, because they are much larger and more powerful than you might think. Occasionally, they would fly away from the set and we would all just have to be patient and wait for them to return to work.” It wouldn’t be the first fashion shoot where feathers were flying. Here, Style.com has a look at the campaign (pictured, above) and an exclusive behind-the-scenes shot (pictured, below) from the set.

Photo: Ryan McGinley/ Courtesy of Edun