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August 31 2014

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4 posts tagged "Ryan McNamara"

From Public School To The Fashion Trenches

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For a girl not even finished with college—she’s got a semester left at Columbia—Lily Kwong has a pretty fair number of achievements already under her belt. She’s worked at the studio of her cousin, Joseph Altuzarra; in magazines, at GQ; kept an enviably packed social calendar; and modeled on the runways. But if that weren’t all enough, there’s her latest project, working with public school kids with the nonprofit JAM (Jamboree for Arts and Music). Produced by Nuvana—a gaming development company that has produced educational games for Nickelodeon and PBS—JAM creates arts-centric assignments for students (everything from creating a piece of public art to visiting a local museum exhibition and reinterpreting a piece), which can then be shared via its own social network. Partnering with local institutions during the pilot run, JAM sent kids to sites like the Bronx Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, and the New Museum in New York, and SFMoMA and the De Young Museum in San Francisco.

Over the weekend, the highest-achieving participants in the program were invited to the first JAM Lab, a day-long workshop focused on producing a photo shoot, taking its cues from a world Kwong knows well: fashion editorial. Mentors like Garance Doré, Vena Cava’s Lisa Mayock, Shipley & Halmos’ Sam Shipley, model Claudia Mason, and performance artist Ryan McNamara stopped by to offer their advice on shooting, styling, and posing. “With arts and music programs dwindling in public schools, we need [JAM] more than ever now,” Kwong said by phone yesterday. “You could really feel that at the JAM Lab event—these kids were so hungry to express themselves and create something. They’re just so inspired by seeing people who make art for a living.”

Drawing in the experts turned out to be easy. “When I asked them, everyone right away said of course,” Kwong said. “Everyone has a story about their first teacher who made an impact on them, or the first time they realized their creative potential. I think everyone walked away feeling really excited to be a part of it.” The amateurs turned out to have plenty to offer their advisers, too. “Fashion has a particular logic and the kids turned it on its head. The kids thought about things we hadn’t thought about, were using props in ways we weren’t expecting, framing things in interesting ways. I think a lot of our mentors walked away with good ideas for upcoming shoots and projects.”

For more information on JAM and Nuvana, visit www.jam4art.org or www.nuvana.org.

Photos: Olivia Barad

Designers And Artists On The MOVE!

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At Visionaire‘s Halloween party on Saturday, an elaborately costumed crowd took to the sweaty dance floor to cut loose. The designers on hand deserved it. They’d been in the museum all day, installing MOVE!, an exhibition curated by Visionaire‘s Cecilia Dean and journalist David Colman that paired artists and designers to create—well, whatever they wanted.

MOVE! is a unique experience of art and fashion, where one is a reflection of the other,” explained Italo Zucchelli. “Reflection” was literal in the case of the “live sculpture” he and Terence Koh created: two silver-painted and -cloaked men (above), walking continuously toward and away from one another. “Bringing the future into history and presenting it as a perfect present,” Koh described it in a rare moment of verbosity.

Performance artist Ryan McNamara—who recently completed five months of public dance lessons for a project called Make Ryan a Dancer—took the weekend off to act as instructor. McNamara and 11 dancers, in costumes designed by Robert Geller, taught museum-goers everything from strip dance to traditional Korean moves. “We created this McNamara/Geller carnival of dancers, with Ryan as this kind of crazy Andy Warhol carnie directing the whole thing,” Geller said. “Sometimes art and fashion can be too serious. This was meant to be fun, and even a little funny.” Continue Reading “Designers And Artists On The MOVE!” »

The Most Powerful Women In The World, Where The Fashion Set Will Be This Halloween, And More…

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The Forbes list of the world’s 100 most powerful women is out, and fashion plates are well represented: There’s our impeccably attired FLOTUS, Michelle Obama (we like to think of her as Clotheshorse in Chief), holding strong at #1, as well as Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (#35), Heidi Klum (#39), Sarah Jessica Parker (#45), and Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts (#97). [Vogue U.K.]

If you’ve ever wanted to see a Robert Geller “old-school French boudoir type of” stripper’s outfit, you’re in luck: It’s one of the many artist/designer collaboration projects at Move!, an exhibition and party that’ll be held at P.S. 1 at the end of October. (The collaborator in question is Ryan McNamara, the performance artist who’ll be learning to strip-dance, as well as soft-shoe and plié.) Proenza Schouler, Narciso Rodriguez, Rodarte, Italo Zucchelli, Terence Koh, Kalup Linzy, and Dan Colen are all also involved in the project, organized by Visionaire‘s Cecilia Dean and The New York Times‘ David Colman and capped off with a Visionaire Halloween party on the 31st. [WWD]

Dolce & Gabbana made a short ad for their new Martini Gold vermouth, starring Italian sexpot Monica Bellucci. It’s almost enough to convince you to buy vermouth. [Fashionista]

And Brooklyn boutique Epaulet has opened a Lower East Side pop-up shop, which will be vending exclusive designer collabs through October only. Head over for Gitman Vintage shirts, Japanese twill chinos, hand-knit cardigans, and Wisconsin-made boots. [NYT]

Photo: Andrea Renault / SIPA Press

Blasblog: Diana Widmaier Picasso’s Cure For The Too-Many-Parties Blues

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Down here in Miami, I’ve found that fashion folk and art worlders have at least one hobby in common: They all love to complain. (That doesn’t exclude me, either; I’ve caught myself moaning when a party has prosecco instead of Champagne or, even worse, doesn’t have sparkling water.) Parties are too boring, too New York, or too unoriginal; they start too late, or there’s too many of them. It’s always something. But for all the complaints, there was one party that was totally singular and totally fascinating. It was Diana Widmaier Picasso’s fête at the Raleigh for Klaus Biesenbach, the recently appointed director of P.S.1 and a Chief Curator at Large at MoMA, which featured midnight performances from Kalup Linzy, Ryan McNamara, and Terence Koh.

“I wanted to do something special, something fun, something unordinary,” Picasso explained (that’s her on James Franco’s right, with Linda Yablonsky). So she did. The night started with Linzy (pictured, left) performing some of the numbers from his music videos, which you’ve seen here. McNamara then tore through the crowd with his spotlight dance performance, and Terence Koh finished the evening with his piece, which started with him lying motionless on the floor of one of the hotel’s restaurant terraces and ended with a mass migration of the whole party to the beach, with plastic cups and bottles of booze stolen from the bar. It was festive and fun, completely original, and unrepeatable. Even so, I heard someone complain that it was too cold outside.

 

Photo: Derek Blasberg