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August 28 2014

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78 posts tagged "Saint Laurent"

People Are Buying a Lot of Saint Laurent Dresses

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Saint Laurent

Despite their hefty price tags, which range anywhere from $2,490 to $68,000, Saint Laurent dresses are in seriously high demand. According to Bloomberg, Hedi Slimane’s frocks have been selling so well that they’ve compensated for Gucci’s declining handbag sales and helped to raise parent company Kering’s profits by a whopping 4 percent. Looks like there are more moneyed scenesters out there than we had originally thought.

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo/ Indigitalimages.com

Here’s What Our Editors Will Be Buying for Fall

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It may be warm here in New York today, but the Fall collections are already hitting stores and cooler weather is just around the corner. Our Fall Shopping Guide should help you ready your wardrobe for the autumn months, but for some further inspiration, have a look at our editors’ Fall picks, below.

Nicole Phelps

Nicole Phelps, Executive Editor

A good fashion week dress from Damir Doma and a good fashion week shoe from Saint Laurent, not necessarily to be worn together. And because I’m not quite ready to admit that the shows are five weeks away, a pair of rehabbed vintage Levi’s from the new denim brand Re/Dun to wear all August long.

Damir Doma dress, $780, Buy it now; Saint Laurent kitten heel, $595, Buy it now; Re/Dun straight skinnies, $232, for more information, visit redun.com.

Margiela

Katharine K. Zarrella, Associate News Editor

I have poor blood circulation and am thus constantly freezing. I can’t wear my vintage 1920s monkey-fur coat all the time (though I’d love to), so I’m planning to rely on this cropped goat-hair jacket from Maison Martin Margiela for some deeply chic everyday insolation.

Maison Martin Margiela goat-hair-trimmed wool-blend cropped jacket, $2,590, Buy it now

Sandro

Amber Kallor, Senior Beauty Editor

Should another Polar Vortex descend upon New York, I’ll be prepared with this oil-print anorak from Sandro. The sleek silhouette makes it easy to slip in and out of backstage, but the down filling provides plenty of warmth while I’m trekking from show to show.

Sandro oil-printed anorak, $775, Buy it now

Adam Lippes

Brittany Adams, Associate Fashion Editor

The bitter Polar Vortex we New Yorkers endured this past winter shook me to the core (I’m still in a state of disbelief walking around in bare legs this summer) and already has me preparing for the cold months ahead. If there’s one trend I’m eager to get my hands on next season, it’s a statement-making shearling. I’m currently pining over Adam Lippes‘ oh-so-cuddly navy belted topper. It’s the stylish equivalent of a bear hug and will be sure to earn me compliments while keeping out the chill.

Adam Lippes belted shearling coat, $3,290, Buy it now

Missoni

Rachel Walgrove, Social Media Editor

It’s time to upgrade the ponchos that are currently in my closet. In chenille, this Missoni knit basically doubles as a wearable blanket. Plus, it’s super-easy to throw on over just about anything.

Missoni chenille poncho, $250, Buy it now

APC

Noah Johnson, Deputy Editor

Louis Wong consistently makes impeccable leather jackets under his line for A.P.C., but this season’s Ferris jacket is the first one that I must own. Colored suede was among my favorite trends from the Spring ’15 men’s shows, but I’m impatient, so waiting until next season is out of the question.

A.P.C. Louis W. Ferris jacket, $1,395, Buy it now

Zana Bayne

Kristin Anderson, Assistant Editor of Special Projects

When fashion week hits, my current shoulder bag may not cut it. This stunning tote from Zana Bayne is big enough for a notebook, tape recorder, flats, and maybe even a pilfered Perrier (or two).

Zana Bayne pentagram handbag, $525, Buy it now

Gucci

Jessica Teves, Site Director

I’m a bit mad for cozy pastels, so this boxy Gucci peacoat is the perfect transitional piece for the cooler months—plus, it livens up my go-to uniform of skinny jeans and a white T-shirt.

Gucci wool double-breasted peacoat, $2,500. For more information, visit gucci.com.

Shrimps

Emily Farra, Editorial Coordinator

I love Shrimps’ irreverent approach to faux fur—there’s nothing stuffy or upper crust about it. This camel, blush, and orange coat features all of my favorite fall colors, plus it won’t break the bank like the real thing would. I’d much rather wear a faux color-blocked version than blend into the pack of women in the same chocolate-brown mink.

Shrimps faux-fur coat, $920, Buy it now

The Row

Erinn Hermsen, Assistant Managing Editor

Despite my Wisconsin roots, I’m a wimp when it comes to the cold. Sweaters are a key part of my daily uniform during the fall and winter months, and The Row‘s cozy cashmere version would be the perfect addition to my rotation.

The Row cashmere sweater, $4,550. For more information, visit saksfifthavenue.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photos 

Shop the Look: Fringe Factor

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Fringe Fashion

Ever since Karl Lagerfeld sent models down a Dallas runway in miles of fringe, cowboy boots, and blanket-striped ponchos for Chanel’s Métiers d’Arts show, there’s been a collective shift toward Western style. But you don’t have to live in Texas or own a Palomino to pull it off. Fashion houses like Valentino and Saint Laurent are giving fringe a chic, citified appeal. In earthy hues like ecru, black, and burnt sienna, fringe is perfect for the workweek ahead and your weekend trip upstate—it’s as easy as swapping your pumps for desert boots. Shop our favorite fringe pieces by J.Crew, Tamara Mellon, and more, below.

1. Tamara Mellon fringed suede pencil skirt, $895, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Samuji ecru white rooibos crop top, $400, available at avenue32.com

3. J.Crew chain tassel earrings, $58, available at jcrew.com

4. Saint Laurent fringe small bucket bag, $2,150, available at barneys.com

5. Valentino C-Rockee fringed leather sandals, $1,095, available at mytheresa.com

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Rock-Star Style: Get With the Band

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Now Trending Rockstar

Rock stars embody a sense of freedom and glamour that fashion will forever be chasing after. No designer has championed the rocker look more than Hedi Slimane, who successfully revitalized Saint Laurent by mining youth-culture codes for creative inspiration. A true fanboy, Slimane regularly casts lanky musicians to walk his runway shows and also fills his front rows with a tribe of real-life musicians, including Alex Turner, Miles Kane, and The Kills’ Alison Mosshart. But SL isn’t the only brand getting with the band lately. For his Diesel Black Gold Resort collection, Andreas Melbostad studded and stenciled tough leather vests and biker jackets that read “Race to the Grave.” Haider Ackermann took his signature decadent aesthetic in an edgier direction for Spring ’15 with black vinyl pants and silk sashes worthy of Keith Richards. And Undercover’s Jun Takahashi paid tribute to New York’s proto-punk scene by featuring the cover art from Television’s Marquee Moon album in his latest menswear lineup. Off the catwalk, models of the moment are striking a similar note with electric, eclectic ensembles. During the Paris menswear shows, Grace Hartzel’s bohemian frock and silver amulets channeled a Ladies of the Canyon vibe, while Waleska Gorczevski paired a grungy Nirvana T-shirt with black shredded jeans—proof that the rock-star trend is as much about attitude as it is about the clothes.

Here, a slideshow of our favorite rocker looks.

Christopher Owens Talks Shooting Photos With Hedi Slimane, Going Country, and Modeling to Fund His Art

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christopherowens

Two years ago, indie-rock figurehead Christopher Owens and his friend Hedi Slimane found themselves in the same position, tasked with starting new chapters in their careers: Owens had just announced the dissolution of his band Girls and Slimane was newly in charge at Saint Laurent, so they turned to each other for help. Slimane recruited Owens for his first campaign at the storied fashion house; that project doubled as Owens’ coming-out party as a solo artist. It was a mutually beneficial move that allowed Slimane to establish the rock-and-roll vibe he’s since maintained and gave Owens greater visibility as an artist and model. (Owens has since starred in an ad for Isabel Marant’s capsule collection for H&M, and has lent his looks to other photographers, including Logan White who snapped the shot above.)

A year later, Owens has settled into his solo career and reinvented himself again—this time with spurs and Stetson hats. His next solo album, fittingly titled A New Testament, has more of a country lean than anything he’s done before and, with it, comes Owens drawing from his days spent working on a ranch in Amarillo, Texas—cowboy attire, to boot. While preparing for the announcement of A New Testament—out September 30—the San Francisco-based artist took a moment to talk about his friendship with Slimane, his new country look, and his reaction to how musicians are turning more to fashion to fund their art.

Had you been thinking of exploring country music in a more overt way for a while?
On the first Girls album, Album, there’s a song called “Darling” that I feel is a little country. On Broken Dreams Club, we tried to do things that were pretty country—we even had a pedal steel player. It was something I hoped to do in a more focused way. Then when I actually put my shoulder to the boulder on this one, I found all of these great elements coming out from people I had asked to work with me and I didn’t try to suppress those things. At the end of the day, I thought, We’re not coloring in the lines of the country aesthetic, but it would be a shame not to use it.

christopherowens3

It seems like you’ve committed to that aesthetic all around. In promo photos, you wear country gear.
There is a bit of a story behind that. I lived in Amarillo for nine years before moving to San Francisco. I worked on a ranch, and the hats I’m wearing in the photos come from that period. One was a parting gift I got when I left the ranch. On various Girls tours, I’ve stopped in Amarillo and bought a new pair of boots—not thinking, One day I’ll use this for an album aesthetic. It’s just fun to get to do all of this stuff, image-wise. Modern country people are doing everything from dubstep to rapping; I think there’s room for me in there.

Has your wardrobe expanded a lot since you’ve taken on these modeling jobs with Hedi Slimane and Isabel Marant for H&M?
In the H&M shoot, I only wore one T-shirt and jeans, so I didn’t get any kind of wardrobe expansion, but Hedi was nice enough to send me a few things that I really liked.

Interestingly, when I signed up for H&M I was a little bit scared—it was very different from Saint Laurent. As much as it was whirlwind, when it came time to do the editorial photos for Saint Laurent, I had already shot on a personal level at my house, walking around Golden Gate Park, and Hedi’s house in L.A. as a friend—photos that weren’t to be used for anything, just photos for photos’ sake. We had become friends, so when he said, “Do you want to do this?” it was easier to say yes. Jeez, Yves Saint Laurent was a pillar of fashion, and I kind of fancy myself as a young David Bowie dipping my toe in the fashion pool.

The H&M thing was something where I thought, Maybe it’s not really me. I don’t know anyone there. At the same time, the music industry is changing. People don’t survive on record sales anymore. I had done a boutique-y album with my first solo album and said, “I’m only going to play small rooms with good sounds. I’m not going to play any festivals because they throw you up on stage five minutes before your set with no sound check.” Coachella was going to pay me for a short set whether it was good or not, and I said no to that. So the H&M thing seemed like the right thing to do at the right time. They were happy to pay me for my time. I lost money touring because I took a nine-piece band on a theater tour, and this was a way for me to recoup with my label and have money to do this album.

Sky Ferreira, another musician who has modeled for Hedi, has also talked about how modeling can be a good way to fund art.
I think it’s a very genuine issue right now for artists to find other ways to make money. People stream your music on Spotify and you get zilch back, and you’re expected to make videos and do a lot of things that cost money. I think it’s important to have some moral template that you keep in mind. I wouldn’t want to say, “Just hand over the rights of a song to a company to do whatever with.” I’m happy to take a photo. I like doing that. I think we will see more of this.

christopherowens2

On the flip side, have you thought about why brands are more interested in using musicians instead of models?
You could be right about that, but, for me, I don’t really see that. I remember when Pete Doherty was Hedi Slimane’s muse. Back in the day, Mick Jagger and Bowie and Liza Minnelli were in fashion. I think it’s something that left during the post-punk alternative craze of everybody having to make a point and say “I’m not a sellout,” but I think that’s going away again. People are saying, “I like to work with other people on other things that’s not my work,” whether that’s being in a movie or being in fashion. I want to have budgets to make exciting records. I want to do things even bigger than I’ve been able to do.

Before the Saint Laurent ads, you weren’t in the mainstream public consciousness. How did you deal with being the face of a massive campaign?
[Hedi] followed it up very quickly with photos of Marilyn Manson, Courtney Love, and Beck, so the focus was taken off me very quickly. I feel like my photos that happened in the beginning were a bit anonymous. People were like, “Who is this Macaulay Culkin type with bad teeth in the new ads?” And it didn’t really matter who it was. The comments I saw were more on the aesthetic rather than directed toward me.

I really enjoyed that whole experience and I would do it again. Hedi was behind the camera. It wasn’t like I came in and shook his hand and he handed me off to some crew. It was very relaxed. The model was very professional and helped me to understand what to do in a photo shoot. I like to think of Hedi as a friend. He’s a very personable guy. No airs of greatness. He just likes to do his work, and he seems to work a lot, which I respect.

christopherowens4The timing was really interesting because both of you were kind of in the same place in different industries.
Yeah. It was while I was on the ranch that Hedi called me to ask about doing the campaign. I was on a little trip that was designed to get away from things—after I made the announcement that I was leaving my band—and I went to see my family and went back to Amarillo and stayed on Stanley Marsh’s ranch. The timing is bizarre, but isn’t that the way it goes? Sometimes things just line up right.

Photo: Logan White; Courtesy of Turnstile Records