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August 20 2014

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37 posts tagged "Salvatore Ferragamo"

Mira, Off The Wall

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Massimiliano Giornetti created a Fall ’12 collection for Salvatore Ferragamo so Russian in its references, you wouldn’t have been surprised to find out that the peasant dresses or astrakhan-tipped coats came with their own bottles of vodka. (Cheers to that idea, or as the Russians say: Nazdarovye!) So it’s only fitting that for Fashion’s Night Out, the Ferragamo store on Fifth Avenue is celebrating Russophile-style, with a party hosted by Moscow style queens Elena Perminova, Anya Ziourova, and Miroslava Duma (pictured). (Russian pop band Tesla Boy will be making its first ever stateside appearance as well.) Street-style star Duma admits that it’s only for love of Ferragamo and Mother Russia that she’s making it to New York fashion week this season; taking care of her young son and implementing world domination plans for her Web site, Buro 24/7, don’t leave her much spare time for shows, or dressing for them. But Ferragamo’s invitation was too good to pass up. “People are really fascinated by Russia right now,” Duma notes. “Which makes sense, because we were hidden for so long. And for me, it’s a great thing, to be given the opportunity to show New Yorkers some Russian culture. And,” she adds, “to show them, maybe, it’s different than they think.” Here, Duma talks to Style.com about the Muscovite moment, borrowing and buying, and what she really thinks about Pussy Riot.


You’re one of a cohort of Russian street-style stars. Why do you think Russians are the It girls on the blogs right now?
Eh, we’re the new thing. You know how fashion is—there’s always got to be a new look, a new idea, a new story. For a moment, street-style blogs were the new thing; now they have to look for a new thing. So today it’s Russians.

Do you think there’s a distinctively Russian sense of style?
I think Russia is still figuring out its style. Look at the history—we had cultural stagnation for like, 75 years. And in the Soviet Union, it really was, you had to wait outside in the cold to buy toilet paper. That scene in Moscow on the Hudson, that was a real thing. So in the 1990s, when we discovered oil, and this sheik era of Russia began, of course everyone wanted to buy the most expensive things. And they wanted to show off. I was a kid when this was going on, but I remember a rich woman saying to me, Listen, if you want to buy Versace, you make sure you buy something with a big logo, because otherwise, it’s a waste of money. Even later, at the beginning of the 2000s, I can remember going to into bars in Moscow and seeing at least five girls wearing the same Dolce & Gabbana logo jeans.

Now, Russians are more educated about fashion, and people with money, they want something unique. Unique and discreet. A couture suit, maybe. If it’s one of a kind, they’ll spend for that. And also now, there are different ways to be stylish. I mean, there’s always a woman in Russia who, you know, she’s got a rich husband who doesn’t know about fashion but who buys all her clothes, and he wants her to look sexy. And there are these girls, and some of them look really great, I must say, who are the daughters of very rich men, and they buy whole looks from Céline or Proenza. They want to look super-cool. And there are also the fashion professionals, who travel for work, and who know the little vintage places in Paris or London, and they mix and match a lot of things.

Do you like getting photographed for street-style blogs? I feel like it would stress me out. I mean, how much time do you spend putting together your fashion week outfits?
Donna Karan said if it takes you more than 20 minutes to get dressed, then you’ve got a problem. I live by that. I won’t spend a lot of time planning my outfits, even at fashion week. But I don’t have to—I mean, my talent in life is, I have a good imagination to put together an outfit. I’m not the most beautiful girl, I don’t write poems, I don’t make music, I’m not the best tennis player, but I can create a look, you know?

Has the attention changed the way you dress?
Yeah…Sometimes I’ll do a crazy outfit I know fashion people will appreciate, but then I look at myself and think, wow, if my husband saw me now, he’d say, are you OK? In my normal life, I mostly wear, like, jeans. Simple things.

Do you own everything you wear that gets shot for the blogs?
I probably shouldn’t say this, but a lot of my clothes are borrowed. I’m sure people look at me and think, Pfff, this girl, she’s just a silly girl with a credit card with no limit. But that’s not true! Maybe no designer will loan to me now…I mean, isn’t the whole point that girls think I bought the dress from so-and-so, so they go out and buy that dress?

So I went to look at your Web site, Buro 24/7, but it’s in Russian. Looks good, but what is it?
Buro is a news site that provides quality information on fashion, art, architecture, culture, books, social life. Basically it’s a source that keeps you posted on everything interesting that happens in the world—the kind of stuff you can talk about with people you don’t really know, after you’ve talked about the weather.

Any plans to expand outside of Russia?
We already have! We recently launched, by license, a European edition based in Croatia, and we’re planning to open a London office very soon and start an English edition. Plus there’s a Middle East version I already have partners for, and we hope to do an Asian version of Buro, and so on.

I mean this kindly: You really don’t look like the mastermind of an international media empire. Like, you’re very cute.
Thank you.

Speaking of cute Russian girls out to change the world…
Are you going to ask me about Pussy Riot?

Well, they’ve really become a cause célèbre in the West. But I have a sneaking suspicion that opinions are different inside Russia. What’s your take?
My opinion is that these are very stupid girls. OK, so they have problems with the president—no president is perfect. But what did they change? Who did they help? How did they improve the situation in Russia? All they did was start an argument. And offend and humiliate people who believe in God. That’s it. I do a lot of charity work, there are many orphans in Russia who need help, so it’s not like all I see is rich people and fashion. I know there are things in this country that could be better. But this…Ugh. You know, people who say, oh, Pussy Riot is so great—I feel like, they don’t know what’s happening in Russia, they don’t know how Russians think, what they’ve experienced. I’d love to ask some of these people, who love Pussy Riot, if they can tell me anything else—any single thing—about the political situation in Russia today. I’d be very surprised if many people took the time to find out more about what’s happening.

So I guess you’ve got some opinions about this whole thing.
Everyone in Russia has an opinion. [Sighs.] Look, I love America. Everyone’s so kind and positive. They don’t know what it’s like in Russia—I mean, this is a silly example, but if you look at comments on street-style blogs, in Russia it’s all ugly. There’s a lot of envy. But in the States, you know, there’s some of that but there’s also people making compliments. You never get a compliment in Russia. So you have to understand with these girls, these stupid girls, that what they did was triple the negativity.

Anything you’re particularly looking forward to for Fashion’s Night Out? Are you a big Tesla Boy fan?
I just like that there’s this event to celebrate shopping. Sometimes I feel, men really are lucky—they’re strong, they don’t get pregnant, they can sleep with many women, and no one cares—but women, they have fashion. We have this pleasure, to go shopping and play with beautiful clothes, and no one ever takes it seriously but it’s important, you know? Russia, for more than 70 years, we didn’t get to shop. We didn’t have fashion. So maybe we appreciate this idea more than most people.

Photo: Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo

Fall Ferragamo, Bag It Now

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When editors left the Fall Salvatore Ferragamo show in Milan, they were all in agreement that they had seen plenty of wearable options on the runway. At last, we can follow-up on those wish lists we started making back in February and buy some of those military and baroque pieces we liked so much. Ferragamo has made the process even easier with its online trunk show (starring model and It girl Lily Kwong), which launched earlier this week, offering the brand’s Fall ready-to-wear range and the opportunity to buy actual accessories from the runway looks. One of our favorites is this drawstring bag with embroidered gold detailing ($1,490), available exclusively from the limited-time trunk show at Trunkshow.Ferragamo.com. If we order it now, we should have it just in time for fashion week.

Photo: Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo

Brits Take Heels To New Heights, And More Of Today’s Top Stories

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Can you guess who wears the highest heels in Europe? According to a recent study, its the British women who take the cake, with an average heel height of 3.3 inches. Victoria Beckham (pictured) and Cheryl Cole come to mind, leading the pack against French women who come in at 2.4 inches and German women at 2.7. [Vogue U.K.]

Salvatore Ferragamo is following in the footsteps of the likes of Hermès, Armani, and Stella McCartney as the next designer label to outfit athletes for the 2012 Olympics. The Italian brand is designing uniforms for the Republic of San Marino, an independent microstate of Italy. The capsule collection fuses functionality and high-fashion and will be worn at leisure events and galas. [WWD]

Natalia Vodianova truly is beautiful inside and out. Just three days after devastating floods hit the Russian town of Krymsk earlier this month, the model flew to her native country to help out. She assisted with the hauling of bottled water and nappies in an attempt to aid the thousands of people who were left homeless after the natural disaster. [Telegraph]

The Galeries Lafayette is getting ready to host the third edition of its “World’s Biggest Fashion Show.” The department store plans to bring fashion to the streets with a mega catwalk event featuring 400 models on September 18 in Paris. The fashion fête will than move on to other cities in France September 22. [WWD]

Photo: ChinaFotoPress / Getty Images

Running Shoes Get The High Fashion Treatment

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In the 1988 film Working Girl, Melanie Griffith’s character famously wore sneakers for her daily commute, swapping them out for heels at the last possible minute outside the office. These days, both designers and street-style notables are leaving their dressy footwear at home and making fashion statements with athletic shoes. And no, we’re not talking about those ubiquitous Isabel Marant wedges. We’re referring to a specific subgenre of sneaker, i.e. competitive trainers made for running sprints (whether they be around the track or on the city sidewalks).

The trend really kicked into gear last month, when Tommy Ton snapped dapper guys wearing Nike and New Balance in Milan and Paris. Similar styles showed up on the runways at the Salvatore Ferragamo, Raf Simons, and Valentino menswear shows. Girls are embracing the look, too. At the opening of Yayoi Kusama’s Whitney retrospective, the artist Kara Walker dressed down her Zero + Maria Cornejo dress with sporty sneaks, while Vika Gazinskaya was among those who wore them during Couture.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW of stylish kicks.

Photo: Alessandro Viero / GoRunway.com

In Florence, The Stars Align

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The Italians are noted for their national pride, but the opening night of Florence’s Pitti Immagine fairs this week—the menswear spectacle that is Pitti Uomo; the women’s complement, Pitti W; and the childrenswear fest, Pitti Bimbi—found Ferragamo celebrating an American: Marilyn Monroe. In fairness, Salvatore Ferragamo himself did pitch his tent in Hollywood, where he made shoes for the stars (including Marilyn, a size 6), and Monroe is an enduring icon. Why? “Marilyn is a quintessential actress,” opined Rose Byrne (above), who turned up to bring some celeb wattage (circa 2012) to the event. “Mystery, beauty, and tragedy—that will forever intrigue people.” So, it goes without saying, will clothes. A staggering variety of Marilyn’s were on display, including notable on-screen outfits, like the beaded black dress she wore as Sugar Kane in the immortal Some Like It Hot. Curator Stefania Ricci was at pains to pick just one favorite. Pressed to choose, she went for “photos of Marilyn when she was very young, blonde, with no makeup—photos that are [almost] an interpretation of death.” A more literal interpretation of Monroe’s death closed the exhibit: a tableau of a body in bed, as Marilyn was found. Spooky.



One star gave way to many as guests moved from the Museo Salvatore Ferragamo to Fiesole, in the hills outside Florence, for a dinner in plein air. Brunello Cucinelli threw his biannual Pitti opening celebration for a party of a hundred-plus, in a medieval castle dating back to somewhere between the tenth and thirteenth centuries (above). That’s the kind of history even Hollywood can’t cop to, though the site turned out to have had a few modern roles, too. During the second World War, it had been occupied by the Nazis, then was the site of a skirmish between them and combined U.S./Scottish forces. A bullet hole near the entrance hall serves as a permanent reminder. At his expansive booth at the Pitti Uomo fair today, Cucinelli glowed as he spoke of the beauty of the building and the beauty of Italy—one he aims to uphold in his collections. Seen his way, his trademark one-and-a-half breast jackets, down-filled gilets (with hand-picked down to avoid any sharp or rough segments), and ultra-light knits are practically a civic duty. “We believe in the state very much, so I have recalled all the great masters,” he said, via a translator, of his designs. “Italians need to raise our heads again. Our state is an incredible state, and I want to work for it.”

Photos: Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo; Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli