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August 30 2014

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22 posts tagged "SHOWstudio"

Barbie Goes Abroad

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It would seem that Barbie and co. can’t get enough of the London fashion scene. After receiving a rainbow dye job from East London salon Bleach, as well as a graffitied makeover from Louise Gray, last year, and sending Ken to get some new Gareth Pugh threads in 2009, Barbie has tapped Roksanda Ilincic and Nick Knight’s Showstudio to design her new virtual Dreamhouse. Considering Ilincic, who created a frock for Barbie four years ago in honor of her fiftieth anniversary (left), has a background in architecture, we assume she’s more than qualified for the job. Introduced in 1962, Barbie’s Dreamhouses have, of course, traditionally had a Malibu twist, but the new mini-mansion—set to be revealed later this summer—will pull inspiration from London’s gritty streets. Expect a harder, more subversive edge than the previous plastic abodes, but, knowing Ilincic, no less pink.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Daphne Guinness Sings the Blues

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Artist, producer, muse—all words that describe Daphne Guinness. But soprano? Well, there’s a bolt from the blue. Last night, Guinness unveiled her first single (on vinyl, no less), “Fatal Flaw,” at Nick Knight’s SHOWstudio in London’s Belgravia neighborhood—a fitting setting for the reveal, as Knight actually filmed and live-streamed Guinness singing opera last year. (The shoot resulted in five short films that were played in the windows of the French department store Printemps.) Yesterday evening’s event also served as the opening of SHOWcabinet, an intensely personal display case within the SHOWstudio gallery (consider it like an old-time curiosity cabinet) where artists present objects that have mattered throughout their lives.

Guinness is the first to take a turn in Knight’s SHOWcabinet, and the pieces on view indeed tell the story of her life: an ornate armored glove that she created over the span of five years in collaboration with Shaun Leane, a beloved Gareth Pugh leather cage jacket, and some works from Percy Bysshe Shelley and Shakespeare—her constant companions over the years.

Here, in an exclusive interview, Guinness and Knight speak with Style.com about why she decided to bare her soul—and her vocal chords.

Daphne, who knew you were a singer, and a soprano no less. Did you have any formal training?
Daphne Guinness: I wasn’t trained at all—I just made the song up, by mistake actually. If anything, I probably trained myself by listening over the years. I have a four-and-a-half-, nearly five-octave range. I probably should have had extra lessons as a child, as I am certain my family heard my potential, but I didn’t. I was in the choir as a schoolgirl, but really, it is all self-taught.

Why music now?
DG: After children, I had a break in my top range, as my diaphragm dropped because it naturally stretched out. I couldn’t make that jump to singing smoothly. Holding a note is a very difficult thing—you have to use your whole body to achieve a perfect pitch. So my singing languished a bit, but it has always been there. I know it sounds ridiculous when I say I am not a fashion person, because of course I am, but music has a complete effect on me, and the time was ripe to reacquaint myself with it. I suppose I am known for being very visual, but I realized that, for me, it’s all about sound.

Nick Knight: What is interesting is that very few people know that music and sound are really a fundamental part of you. But I do think there is a lot of crossover in the senses, especially with sound and sight. For instance, when I am creating an image, I am actually subliminally looking for a tone or sound, which I don’t hear, but see. So when I get a great picture, in fact I am hearing this perfectly harmonious sound. It’s almost like I am tuning one of my pictures like an instrument. So there is a lot of swap-over between the senses. Unfortunately, we are so conditioned to use one sense for one thing, when actually it is a whole mixture of senses at play in an artistic process. Continue Reading “Daphne Guinness Sings the Blues” »

Seeing a Pattern

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On February 15, Phaidon Press will release Pattern, a book that highlights one hundred compelling fashion designers on the rise. Phaidon handed over the book’s curatorial duties to a group of ten designers and industry insiders (including stylist Keegan Singh, Preen’s Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi, the SHOWstudio team, and Business of Fashion‘s founder Imran Amed, just to name a few), each of whom chose ten talents to fill Pattern‘s pages.

The book (which is a follow-up to the 2005 fashion tome SAMPLE) features established designers (Phillip Lim, Alexander Wang, Christopher Kane, Sarah Burton), well-known emerging labels (Eddie Borgo, Thomas Tait, Creatures of the Wind, Mary Katrantzou, whose work is pictured above), and proper newbies (Simone Rocha, Marques’ Almeida, Phoebe English, Maarten van der Horst). The designers’ diverse aesthetics, techniques and outlooks are presented via detailed introductions, backstage, campaign and editorial photographs, and never-before-seen sketches, all of which serve to give readers an in-depth understanding of their work. “For me, seeing that the designers had a consistent point of view that’s true to their style was important,” said Singh, whose picks include Cushnie et Ochs (left), Olivier Rousteing of Balmain, Tabitha Simmons, Dominic Jones, and Gianvito Rossi, among others. “You know, it’s like Azzedine Alaïa. He has his thing, and he always sticks to it,” he added. So does Singh think the next Alaïa is somewhere between Pattern‘s covers? “It’s a possibility!” he laughed. At the very least, he notes, “the book gives the young designers a chance to reach broader audiences; it exposes them to a whole new group of people.”

Pattern: 100 Fashion Designers, 10 Curators will be available on February 15, on phaidon.com.

Photos: Both images feature in Pattern: 100 Fashion Designers, 10 Curators. Mary Katrantzou—Nick Knight and Dinos Chapman originally for Garage Magazine; Cushnie et Ochs—Courtesy of Cushnie et Ochs.

Nick Knight In Bloom

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For his latest exhibition, opening at SHOWstudio’s London gallery October 11 during the Frieze Art Fair, Nick Knight holed up in a herbarium and spent over three years studying flower specimens. Not your usual fashion photography project by the lensman known for his collaborations with designers like Alexander McQueen and John Galliano, that’s for sure. “Going through the 6.5 million specimens in the Natural History Museum was not only intense because it took my wife and I three and a half years, but it was also an extraordinary project because the act of capturing each of our most favorite discoveries was rigorous,” he tells Style.com of the project, entitled Flora. “In the end [we] edited it down to just 40 individual images.” (Originally, the shots were part of his now out-of-print book by the same name—he’s picked out 15 images from the acclaimed publication to be displayed for the first time at SHOWstudio’s headquarters in London’s Mayfair.) “Because we (understandably) weren’t allowed to remove any of the flora from the museum, we ended up converting an area the size of a broom cupboard in the 131-year-old building into a studio space,” he adds. In conjunction with the exhibition, Paddle8.com launches its online sale of the newly released portfolio of 15 archival prints today, along with a series of Instagram shots Knight did for Paddle8 documenting the creative process behind the flower series. Here, a look at a few of the prints, which showcase the diversity in botany, included in the sale.

Photos: Nick Knight

Digital Daphne

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In May, Daphne Guinness famously settled into the window spaces at Barneys and turned them into her personal dressing room. While the world watched, the artist and social fixture prepared for the Met ball, modeling some of the enviable pieces from her collection. As it turns out, that’s not the last time Guinness played mannequin. Photographer Nick Knight’s SHOWstudio shot images of the heiress that will be used for virtual Printemps window displays in which the digital Guinness models clothes by the likes of Rick Owens, Gareth Pugh, and Maison Martin Margiela. The virtual statues—a part of the Visions Couture display set to be unveiled February 6, will be accompanied by a fashion film of each outfit and a multimedia display.

Photo: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com