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July 28 2014

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20 posts tagged "SIBLING"

NEWGEN Men’s Lucky Seven

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NEWGEN Men's Spring 2014 winners

The British Fashion Council and Topman have awarded seven up-and-coming talents with NEWGEN Men sponsorship for the Spring ’14 season. First-time honorees include Agi & Sam (designed by¬†Agape Mudmulla and Sam Cotton), Astrid Andersen, and Nasir Mazhar, while Matthew Miller, Lee Roach, Shaun Samson, and Martine Rose are returning NEWGEN veterans. The designers will receive funding to present their lines at the London Collections: Men, which kicks off June 16, and join the ranks of former winners like J.W. Anderson, James Long, and SIBLING.

London’s Lean Mean Fashion Machine

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London is jam-packed with emerging fashion talents. And now you can find all of them (or, at least, a lot of them) in one place. On February 17, Machine-A, a concept store founded by Stavros Karelis, will open permanently on 13 Brewer Street (it existed a few years ago, in an experimental capacity). Working with rainbow-haired stylist Anna Trevelyan, who serves as the store’s fashion director, Karelis will stock clothes by brand-new designers (Ashley Williams, Shaun Samson, Agi & Sam) and bright young stars (Louise Gray, Christopher Raeburn, Sibling), alongside wares by established labels like Raf Simons, Chalayan, and Mugler. Karelis hopes that Machine-A will serve as a platform to help promising youngsters establish an early retail presence. In addition to simply selling new designers’ collections, Machine-A will work with up-and-comers on collaborations and in-store installations, the first of which will feature Alex Mattsson. “My personal aim is to [offer] inspirational collections, innovative products, and comfortable high-quality clothes,” says Karelis, who also notes that Trevelyan’s input and keen eye for the next big thing have been invaluable. Case in point: the Spring ’13 ad campaign Trevelyan styled for the shop. Style.com has an exclusive look at the Meinke Klein-lensed images, which feature Machine-A’s Spring stock from Louise Gray (above) and Ashley Williams (below).

Machine-A, located at 13 Brewer Street in London, will open on February 17.

Gender Bender

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From J.W. Anderson‘s tube tops and frilled shorts (above right) to Meadham Kirchhoff‘s tunics and skirts to Sibling‘s fluffy cotton-candy-pink shorts, London’s up-and-coming designers put some extreme feminine twists on their Fall ’13 menswear collections. But while men (who aren’t Marc Jacobs or Andrej Pejic, that is) may be a little hesitant to jump on the gender-bending bandwagon, it would seem that women are, once again, craving an androgynous edge. The proof? Due to popular demand, menswear designers are creating looks tailored just for the ladies. For instance, as deputy editor Matthew Schneier reported from Pitti Uomo yesterday, Andrea Pompilio sent out nine cross-dressing girls (above left) before allowing his male models to walk the Fall runway. “They ask so many times for very petite sizes for women, so why not do it?” he said after the show. Over in London, E. Tautz‘s Patrick Grant was feeling the same pressure. “We just started a very small line of women’s shirts, which kicked off at the request of one of the stores in Japan—who came to our men’s show and asked if they could have small versions of our men’s shirts,” Grant told British Vogue, hinting that a full-on Savile Row-inspired womenswear range might be in his future (the shirt capsule will be available at Matches.com this spring). Of course, shes dressed like hes isn’t a revolutionary trend (Le Smoking, anyone?), but the overlap of his and hers styles in the men’s collections certainly has our attention. So, are designers pushing us to become a bunch of sexless style-ites? Hardly. But if you’re tempted to walk in the other gender’s shoes, Fall ’13′s menswear will more than afford you the opportunity.

Photo: Andrea Pompilio—Gianni Pucci/ InDigital Go Runway; J.W. Anderson—Yannis Viamos/ InDigital Go Runway

What To Expect When You’re Expecting…Sibling

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The Fall ’13 menswear collections begin today in London, followed by the shows at Florence’s Pitti Uomo, in Milan, and in Paris. Before their shows, we’ll be breaking off bite-size previews of what’s to come from some of the most anticipated names.

WHO: Sibling

WHEN: Tuesday, January 8

WHERE: London, England

WHAT (TO EXPECT): “Fall launched from an image of Paula Yates’ tattoo. The tattoo was In Memoriam of Richard Hell, who ‘taught her about sex.’ The collection then became very much about self-referencing—the idea of ‘in memory of.’ The Sibling ideas are pushed forward and mutated, and then humor and a very English attitude are twisted in by our stylist, Katie Grand, for catwalk looks.” —Cozette McCreery, Joe Bates, and Sid Bryan. The designers sent us a preview from the Sibling studio (left) and an inspiration image (below). Nota bene: despite the “in memoriam of” theme, punk rocker and former Voidoids frontman Richard Hell is actually alive; Paula Yates, the British TV presenter and mother of It girls Peaches and Pixie Geldof, passed away in 2000.

At London’s MAN Day, A Dance With Decadence And Repentance

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Jo-Ann Furniss reports on the highs and lows of London fashion week’s dedicated menswear day.

Fat Tuesday swiftly followed by Ash Wednesday, excess followed by penance. London fashion week’s MAN Day had the luck to fall on the latter this season. After the heady womenswear week closing on Tuesday, was it the turn of the sackcloth and ashes of menswear for Wednesday? Not quite; there were still some traces of carnival in the first day of Lent, even if at times they looked like the discarded remnants.

Earlier in the week, knit line Sibling’s carnival-referencing women’s collection, Sister, had been presented, alongside a few looks from the men’s—it made their best outing yet. But for the full men’s presentation on MAN Day, the party was over: Designers Joe Bates, Sid Bryan, and Cozette McCreery created an installation (pictured, above) in the form of a prison visiting room with a clever film by Sam Renwick and Thomas Bryant. It was in the shape of a triptych echoing the visiting booths, complete with telephone connections to the sound. “It’s where a matriarch might visit a son. Or vice versa,” Bates said. Yet the clothes were still their bright, excessive selves even behind bars. Called Marked Man, with designs based partly on prison tattoos, there was as much of the matriarch in the collection as there was the jailbird. An institutional bright orange was combined with pink ocelot spots in a men’s twinset. Their signature Fair Isle knits were further warped with the seamless addition of a skull with pompom ears blended into the traditional patterns. (It reflected the pompom-decorated full face masks and beanies also on view.) At once sinister and sweet, carnivalesque and penitential, there was something quite Leigh Bowery and Trojan in these proceedings that felt very true to the spirit of London. At the same time, Sibling’s output is so accomplished as to hold a global audience with ease.

Christopher Shannon’s catwalk was the first thing you noticed at his show. The brilliant backdrop was by the all-round creative and too-many-credits-to-mention Julie Verhoeven. “Creatively, I trust her implicitly,” said Shannon backstage. “I did want that inside of a Hoover bag vibe.” That’s certainly what he got. The set featured old tires, strewn pink net curtains with bricks caught in them, abandoned foil balloons in the shape of love hearts, and the bottom half of a female shop dummy, among other violent after-party detritus. At their best, the clothes and accessories had something of this random perversity, too; a broderie anglaise shirt with a ruffled back, a jacket covered in the designer’s swing tags, and a rucksack decorated with innumerable key rings. “We started excessive and pared back,” said the designer, yet there was maybe a bit too much paring back or, ultimately, the simple color palette of navy, white, sand, and black was a little too conservative or too flat to really help make some of the interesting points he was driving at. Continue Reading “At London’s MAN Day, A Dance With Decadence And Repentance” »