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September 2 2014

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2 posts tagged "Sister"

Fringe With Benefits

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Fringe from Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs, and Sister by Sibling

Fringe, in every length, style, and color, has been adding a playful kick to the Spring ’14 collections. It surfaced early in NYC, namely at 3.1 Phillip Lim and Ralph Rucci. The former showed fringe on punctuated-block tops in Neapolitan hues, while the latter offered an evening gown tiered in fiber-optic strands that radiated with synthetic rainbow phosphorescence (“eyelashes,” Rucci called the textile).

At Rodarte, Kate and Laura Mulleavy paid homage to their beloved Los Angeles, attaching long tassels to trash-fab grommeted belts and heavy leather skirts. Proenza Schouler‘s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez whipped up a lattice-patterned overcoat in shredded fabric—scraps of which were dip-dyed crimson red, and Marc Jacobs enhanced his collection’s Victorian vibe via bunches of fluid thread (above, center). Meanwhile, Francisco Costa—who celebrated ten years at the helm of Calvin Klein—also implemented fringe on a number of sporty silhouettes (above, left), breathing a reinvigorated rawness into his famed streamlined aesthetic.

The trend has been spotted out of the gate in London, too. Sister by Sibling used drapery tassels on netted skirts (above, right), while Holly Fulton employed wispy stranding on topcoats at her seventies-influenced outing. Of the fringe effect, New York’s Fivestory owner Claire Distenfeld told Style.com, “Amazing elements from the past are back in full force, including fringe. As a romantic, I’m ready to embrace it.”

Photos: IndigitalImages.com

At London’s MAN Day, A Dance With Decadence And Repentance

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Jo-Ann Furniss reports on the highs and lows of London fashion week’s dedicated menswear day.

Fat Tuesday swiftly followed by Ash Wednesday, excess followed by penance. London fashion week’s MAN Day had the luck to fall on the latter this season. After the heady womenswear week closing on Tuesday, was it the turn of the sackcloth and ashes of menswear for Wednesday? Not quite; there were still some traces of carnival in the first day of Lent, even if at times they looked like the discarded remnants.

Earlier in the week, knit line Sibling’s carnival-referencing women’s collection, Sister, had been presented, alongside a few looks from the men’s—it made their best outing yet. But for the full men’s presentation on MAN Day, the party was over: Designers Joe Bates, Sid Bryan, and Cozette McCreery created an installation (pictured, above) in the form of a prison visiting room with a clever film by Sam Renwick and Thomas Bryant. It was in the shape of a triptych echoing the visiting booths, complete with telephone connections to the sound. “It’s where a matriarch might visit a son. Or vice versa,” Bates said. Yet the clothes were still their bright, excessive selves even behind bars. Called Marked Man, with designs based partly on prison tattoos, there was as much of the matriarch in the collection as there was the jailbird. An institutional bright orange was combined with pink ocelot spots in a men’s twinset. Their signature Fair Isle knits were further warped with the seamless addition of a skull with pompom ears blended into the traditional patterns. (It reflected the pompom-decorated full face masks and beanies also on view.) At once sinister and sweet, carnivalesque and penitential, there was something quite Leigh Bowery and Trojan in these proceedings that felt very true to the spirit of London. At the same time, Sibling’s output is so accomplished as to hold a global audience with ease.

Christopher Shannon’s catwalk was the first thing you noticed at his show. The brilliant backdrop was by the all-round creative and too-many-credits-to-mention Julie Verhoeven. “Creatively, I trust her implicitly,” said Shannon backstage. “I did want that inside of a Hoover bag vibe.” That’s certainly what he got. The set featured old tires, strewn pink net curtains with bricks caught in them, abandoned foil balloons in the shape of love hearts, and the bottom half of a female shop dummy, among other violent after-party detritus. At their best, the clothes and accessories had something of this random perversity, too; a broderie anglaise shirt with a ruffled back, a jacket covered in the designer’s swing tags, and a rucksack decorated with innumerable key rings. “We started excessive and pared back,” said the designer, yet there was maybe a bit too much paring back or, ultimately, the simple color palette of navy, white, sand, and black was a little too conservative or too flat to really help make some of the interesting points he was driving at. Continue Reading “At London’s MAN Day, A Dance With Decadence And Repentance” »