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24 posts tagged "Stella Tennant"

Haute Clothes for Every Occasion: Tim Blanks Throws Back to Valentino Spring 2001 Couture

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valentino

In today’s Throwback Thursday video, Tim Blanks looks back on Valentino’s Spring 2001 Haute Couture collection, which featured “real clothes” and fresh-faced models like Stella Tennant and Carmen Kass. There were suits, cocktail dresses, daywear, evening gowns—everything a woman could ever need, all executed to perfection. “It’s a vision of another time in fashion,” Blanks says. Couture has since become more about spectacle and drama than wearability, but Valentino’s influence remains in Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli’s collections. See for yourself and watch the full video here.

A Midway Fall ’14 Model Report

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Ola Rudnicka and Imaan Hammam

We’ve just passed the midway point of fashion month with the Milan shows well under way, and there have been plenty of memorable modeling moments thus far, particularly for newcomers. In general, the top-tier, A-list catwalkers have been more selective with their schedules, leaving room for fresh faces to ascend the ranks. Perhaps the easiest way to break down our favorite rookies is by hair color. By and large, it’s been the season of the platinum blond, with familiar faces Julia Nobis, Ashleigh Good, Juliana Schurig, Sasha Luss, and Devon Windsor making a strong case for bleached tresses (reminiscent of Khaleesi from Game of Thrones). Several new models have been riding Fall’s peroxide wave, too. First is ethereal Polish beauty Ola Rudnicka, who debuted at Prada’s Spring show and landed a spot in the label’s latest campaign. She’s turned up on just about every major runway in each city so far. Rudnicka kicked things off on a high note in New York, walking Jason Wu, Michael Kors, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs. She went on to do Burberry and Christopher Kane in London, and continued to take Milan by storm, bookending No. 21 on Tuesday in addition to walking Max Mara and Moschino yesterday. Another noteworthy newcomer rocking a flaxen mane is Harleth Kuusik (who currently stars in Proenza Schouler’s Spring ads). In New York, she did turns at Rag & Bone, Victoria Beckham, and Proenza Schouler, then followed those up with J.W. Anderson and Erdem in London. We plan to see a lot more of both Rudnicka and Kuusik next week.

Waleska Gorczevski and Sophie Touchet

Next up is the fiery-tressed group of redheads led by sophomores such as Lera Tribel and Nika Cole (who can forget her teased-out, lamp-shade ’do from Schiaparelli’s Couture show?). They are joined by Quebec native Sophie Touchet, who made an early impact at Thakoon, 3.1 Phillip Lim, MBMJ (a.k.a. Marc by Marc Jacobs), and Burberry Prorsum, then moved on to open Alberta Ferretti and walk in Fendi yesterday. Finally, we’ve got a mixed bag of brunettes, ranging from Dutch stunner Imaan Hammam (she won the genetic lottery with a Moroccan mother and a father from Egypt, and her exotic looks have helped earn her key spots in top-tier casts including Prada, Proenza Schouler, Narciso Rodriguez, and Fendi) to fierce-looking Ronja Furrer (that strong jawline gave her an edge at Altuzarra, Alexander Wang, Christopher Kane, and more). And how about this season’s most buzzed-about newcomer? Waleska Gorczevski has a hell of a name and a hell of a presence. During NYFW, the Brazilian model was the first girl out at Marc Jacobs. She also opened Yigal Azrouël and bookended Victoria Beckham, and has continued to rack up an impressive show list including Calvin Klein Collection, Hugo Boss, Proenza Schouler, Christopher Kane, and Fendi. No doubt Paris will take to her serene, slightly quirky appeal.

Aside from Fall’s freshman class of catwalkers, we’ve witnessed plenty of noteworthy cameos by old-school veterans, too. For example, Alexander Wang’s finale featured the likes of Angela Lindvall, Bridget Hall, Candice Swanepoel, Caroline Trentini, Anne V., Hilary Rhoda, and Jacquetta Wheeler. Meanwhile, Karen Elson has been going at full throttle this year, and she continued to dazzle at Tom Ford, Donna Karan, and Diane von Furstenberg. On the other hand, we’ve got Karolina Kurkova, who surprised us by opening Cushnie et Ochs and turning up at Christopher Kane (where she was easily the most experienced model in the lineup). Other highlights included: Kirsten Owen opening and closing Mary Katrantzou; Mini Anden at Proenza Schouler; Liberty Ross and Stella Tennant at Tom Ford; and the triple threat of Carolyn Murphy, Frankie Rayder, and Liisa Winkler at Michael Kors. Last but not least was the brilliant cast at Burberry Prorsum, which featured Edie Campbell in addition to her two younger sisters, Olympia and Jean. Mark our words, those Campbell girls are stars in the making. And speaking of stars, you can’t deny that Kendall Jenner was a total natural on the runways at Marc Jacobs and Giles.

Photos: Indigitalimages.com

Theory Goes Digital With Stella Tennant

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Stella Tennant for Theory
Stella Tennant for Theory

Theory has tapped the legendary Stella Tennant for its serene (and first-ever) digital campaign. Debuting exclusively here on Style.com, the Lachlan Bailey-lensed campaign includes a collection of ten-second videos (below) featuring Tennant as well as male model Clement Chabernaud. Dressed in Theory’s signature, streamlined Spring ’14 wares—like a white silk blouse and tailored blazer—Tennant glows in the black-and-white clips. “Stella is a perfect fit for Theory, as she is an icon of modernity,” Theory designer Olivier Theyskens, who led the creative direction for the ads, told Style.com. The campaign was shot here in New York and coincides with the brand’s recent shift from Theyskens’ Theory to simply Theory, a decision that was made in an attempt to unify the brand. Theory’s new outdoor and digital campaigns will launch in March, and behind-the-scenes content can be found later today on theory.com.

Christy Turlington Is Missoni’s Wonder Woman

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Christy Turlington for Missoni

Christy Turlington for Missoni

Missoni has a bit of a thing for quirky fashion films. If you’ll remember, last season Stella Tennant struck some wacky poses for the Fall ’13 Alasdair McLellan-lensed campaign and video. The house continues in that vein today, with the debut of its Spring ’14 ads and film. Original-supermodel-going-strong Christy Turlington stars in the Spring spread, showing off Missoni’s printed wares alongside model Vincent Lacrocq and some giant, geometric Plexiglas cutouts (which, if you look closely, actually spell out M-i-s-s-o-n-i frame-by-frame). Shot by artist Viviane Sassen in the Canary Islands, the serene but offbeat images and short have a vintage sci-fi edge, and we think that’s somewhat fitting, considering Turlington—who, at 44, has been nabbing a bevy of major campaigns and recently ran the New York Marathon—is nothing short of a modern-day Wonder Woman. Watch her in the film’s debut, below.

Photos: Viviane Sassen

Isabella Blow: Beyond the Eccentric

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2. Isabella Blow, 2002 (c) Diego UchitelCurator Alistair O’Neill only met the late Isabella Blow once. He was at an art opening with designer Julien Macdonald, one of the late, great Blow’s charges, whom he studied with at the Royal College of Art. “Isabella was wearing a famous Philip Treacy hat, which is in the exhibition. It had feathers around the eyes, which covered her nose and her mouth and her forehead,” he recalled. “I spent the evening talking to her and was completely fascinated. But all that I could concentrate on were her eyes, because I couldn’t really see her mouth. I could only just about listen to what she was saying, and I was just mesmerized by this image of these eyes being framed by the feathers. The combination of her intelligence and her laughing was really intoxicating,” he continued. “I’ve never forgotten that.”

On November 20, O’Neill, along with Shonagh Marshall and Central Saint Martins, will aim to bring the editor, patron, and muse’s work and wardrobe to life with the opening of Isabella Blow: Fashion Galore! at the Somerset House in London. Before her tragic suicide, in 2007, Blow was a pillar of London’s emerging fashion community. Having worked everywhere—from British and American Vogue to The Sunday Times to Tatler—Blow is credited with discovering such designers as Alexander McQueen (as the story goes, she bought his entire graduate collection after it walked down the Central Saint Martins Runway in 1992), milliner Philip Treacy, Jeremy Scott, and Hussein Chalayan, as well as models Sophie Dahl (whom she once described as a “blow-up doll with brains”) and Stella Tennant.

Alexander McQueen and Isabella blow

Aside from being a steadfast supporter of young talents (Treacy and McQueen both lived with her at one point, and she not only gave the designers financial and editorial support but also fed them ideas from her wealth of historical knowledge—fashion and otherwise), Blow, who came from a complicated aristocratic background, was known as a great eccentric—both in her behavior and her dress. Her infamous wardrobe comprised the most extreme pieces by all of the conceptual up-and-comers she helped along the way. And, of course, Treacy’s hats were her screaming signature. Following her death, her sartorial collection was to be sold at Christie’s to settle her estate, but Blow’s friend Daphne Guinness swooped in at the last minute and purchased every piece, because that’s how Isabella—or Issy, as she was known—would have wanted it.

O’Neill, however, did not want to simply paint Blow as an eccentric. “I thought it was important to distance Isabella from those literary ideas of the English eccentric, because they’re often quite tragic,” he explained. “And I’m not sure Isabella was fully tragic—she was quite brave, and very funny. She had a very bored and black humor.” Furthermore, Blow always wore her outfits—whether it be a metallic McQueen corset or an ensemble crafted from brightly hued garbage bags—in a deeply considered manner. “Isabella used her clothes, her hats, and her accessories as a means to modify and transform herself,” said O’Neill. “She had a great eye for silhouette, and her hats were almost a means of plastic surgery for her face, without going under the knife,” added Marshall. “She said they can lift you, they can make you look different, and I think that was something that she really indulged in.” Continue Reading “Isabella Blow: Beyond the Eccentric” »