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July 30 2014

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6 posts tagged "Stephen Gan"

Exclusive: Keeping Up With CR

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CR Fashion Book

Fun fact: Carine Roitfeld’s favorite fairy tale is E.T. “It’s not a traditional fairy tale, but I love E.T. because it combines science fiction and fantasy with a touch of sadness. All of the best fairy tales have that—something dark with something light,” the editor told Style.com. Why on earth would we be speaking with Mlle. Roitfeld about extraterrestrial eighties flicks, you ask? Because “fairy tales” happens to be the concept behind the latest edition of CR Fashion Book, which hits newsstands on February 25.

Considering Roitfeld has facilitated a few fashion Cinderella stories since launching her zine in 2012, “fairy tales” seems a fitting theme for issue four. The editor’s choice to put Kim Kardashian on the cover of issue three helped convince the industry’s elite to (kind of) embrace the reality-TV star. And Kate Upton’s issue one cover made readers recognize that she could be an all-American bombshell and a high-fashion model, too. (For the record, a Brigitte Niedermair pointe shoe and Ukrainian ballet dancer Sergei Polunin covered issue two, but that’s not terribly pertinent here.) Roitfeld’s latest princess-in-the-making? Nineteen-year-old Gigi Hadid, whose Bruce Weber-lensed cover (right) debut exclusively here, alongside a second E.T. themed cover featuring Lindsey Wixson, shot by Sebastian Faena (left). “Gigi is next in the line of athletic, voluptuous babes who transition to high-fashion success,” said CR Fashion Book design director Stephen Gan. Not unlike Kim K., Hadid also happens to be on reality TV—she’s best known for her role on Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills (as a daughter, not a housewife). “It may be a cliché, but this is a girl who lights up a room. When I met her, I immediately sensed her star quality—it was only days later that I found out she was already a reality-TV star,” Gan continued. Did we ever in a million years think Roitfeld would fall for not one, but two reality darlings in the span of six months? No. But we’re inclined to trust her judgment. After all, she did introduce the world to Lara Stone.

Photos: Sebastian Faena, Bruce Weber

The Daily‘s Night

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The Daily Front Row First Annual Fashion Media Awards sponsored by Samsung

Friday evening, underneath the massive crystal chandeliers and amid the rococo decor of the Upper East Side’s Harlow restaurant, fashion’s boldfaced names gathered to dole out The Daily Front Row‘s first annual Fashion Media Awards. The vibe was touchingly familiar, with Tim Gunn introducing TV Personality of the Year Heidi Klum (“I met Heidi nine years ago, and I was a trembling, nervous, sweating, sputtering battling wreck—and I sustained that same demeanor for many, many seasons of Project Runway,” he recalled), Marc Jacobs speaking for the Editor in Chief of the Year winner, Grazia UK‘s Jane Bruton (“She’s the perfect combination of smart, bubbly, and fun—and from what I hear, sometimes a little too much fun,” he joked), and Lady Gaga, in a frenetic finale, presenting Stephen Gan with his Fashion Magazine of the Year award.

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele introduced Model of the Year, Social Media, Karlie Kloss, and reminisced about their first shoot together with Steven Meisel, while Jessica Biel and Elle‘s Joe Zee (winner of the Creative Director of the Year) joked about their “first time” (i.e., first cover) together in 2007, and the discovery of Zee’s “sick hip-hop dance” moves in the years that followed. Later, Bruce Weber came to the stage to speak for longtime friend and Fashion Scoop of the Year winner Ingrid Sischy, who was recognized for her John Galliano feature in Vanity Fair. He was quick to emphasize the significance of the fact that—in the age of insta-everything—her story took two years to complete.

“I think it’s actually a great thing to do a Fashion Media Awards, because fashion media really are a part of the business of fashion—and really help in shaping and creating the image of fashion,” said Jay Manuel between texts to DVF (“Looking forward to that show!”). “The people who go behind the scenes typically need to have the spotlight shot on them, so people know who is behind the images.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Fashion Week Ends, The Parties Don’t

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New York’s party scene never sleeps—even the day following a whirlwind fashion month. Last night, both the fashion and art worlds convened at Sotheby’s S2 Gallery to toast Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld’s latest opening. Dubbed Hue + Cry, the exhibition was the budding megadealer’s first stint as guest curator for the venerable auction house, comprising 30 contemporary works that highlighted the transformation of abstract expressionism. But unlike Restoin-Roitfeld’s typically hip gatherings—often warehouse-based and liquor-fueled—yesterday’s soirée was decidedly a toned-down affair, complete with passed hors d’oeuvres (OK, pigs in a blanket) and sauvignon blanc. “It feels a lot more uptown in here,” quipped V‘s Stephen Gan as he surveyed the mixed-media pieces by contemporary artists including Nicolas Pol, Jin Meyerson, and Angel Otero. Gan’s trek from Lower Manhattan to the uptown York Avenue space took nearly an hour, but the host didn’t mind the commute. “I live five minutes away,” Restoin-Roitfeld shrugged. Still, representing the downtown contingent were the likes of Vito Schnabel, Stavros Niarchos, and girlfriend Jessica Hart, who happily installed themselves near the open bar.

“The show really looks like him, doesn’t it?” mused proud mom Carine Roitfeld in head-to-toe Givenchy. Giovanna Battaglia, clad in Dolce & Gabbana and a sparkling Marni collar necklace, arrived from Paris just in time for her boyfriend’s big night. “This is such a prestigious location,” she
beamed. “Every time Vlad does something, it’s different and a step ahead.” As for the couple’s plans post-fashion month? “This is my first weekend off in a month and a half,” she told Style.com. “But I still have to work—there’s a shoot next week. It never ends.” To wit, at 9 p.m., the guests decamped to Casa Lever, where Aby Rosen, Kim Heirston, and Leo Koenig toasted the young curator with a private dinner.

Photo: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

School Ties

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For every fashion student toughing it out in the university, take hope: You may just find your future collaborator in the trenches. “We met in a college dorm,” Visionaire‘s James Kaliardos said of meeting his magazine’s co-founders, Stephen Gan and Cecilia Dean (left), during their Parsons days. “Stephen needed my food card to eat back then in the cafeteria.” Twenty years later, the trio is still raising eyebrows with their evocative flagship publication and receiving accolades too; they took home the first ever Future of Fashion Award at the 45th Annual YMA FSF Geoffrey Beene National Awards dinner last night.

Despite a Northeast snowstorm warning, a bevy of Visionaire admirers and original supporters (including Diane von Furstenberg, Italo Zucchelli, and Milk Studios’ Mazdack Rassi) turned out anyway. “I feel like we’re the grandpa and grandma of the publication,” Isabel Toledo said of her and husband Ruben’s involvement. “We used to put together the issues in our kitchen and it was the second issue where I literally bound each magazine with thread.”

Needle and thread will always have their place in fashion (and maybe even in publishing), but the business proposals of last night’s newly-anointed Geoffrey Beene scholars, who took home $25,000 scholarships for their work, ranged from tech-oriented to Web 3.0. But if online offers instant gratification, print still has the potential for shelf life. “I have this edition of Visionaire that I kept from the nineties,” Calvin Klein’s Zucchelli said. “It’s about birth and religion and all these different visual ideas. It’s old now, but it’s still really special.”

In London, A Turkish Delight

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The first day of London fashion week is habitually a bit of a cozy domestic affair, mostly modeled by new faces and attended by assistants, but lo! At lunchtime today the full power of international fashion friendship networking was almost surreally visited upon The Old Dairy on Wakefield Street. There on the runway were Natalia Vodianova, Lara Stone, Mariacarla Boscono, and Natasha Poly. There in the audience, Kate Moss, Carine Roitfeld, Emmanuelle Alt, Stephen Gan, et al. The draw? Not a Londoner but a fresh arrival from Turkey, Hakaan Yildrim, a well-known designer who dresses the high-profile media and social glamorati of Istanbul. His all-guns-blazing debut on the Western runway was, it turns out, thanks to his compatriot Mert Alas (one half of Mert & Marcus), who corralled all his friends’ support. What they saw: well-made clothes in the short-tight-sexy mold, treated to cutting techniques involving rippling stand-up frills; peplums; overlapping, interwoven diagonals; and spaghetti strips of leather. There was a lot of intricate work in it—a touch too much in places—but the quality was inarguable and the styling, with the outcrops of ostrich, puts him somewhere in the slipstream of Riccardo Tisci.

Photo: Courtesy of Hakaan