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10 posts tagged "Stuart Weitzman"

Gisele Bündchen Named the New Face of Stuart Weitzman

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stuart-weitzman
If anyone can fill the shoes of Kate Moss—literally and figuratively—it’s Gisele Bündchen, who has replaced the Brit supermodel as the new face (and feet) of Stuart Weitzman. Also known as the wealthiest model in history, Bündchen appears in the Mario Testino-lensed Fall ’14 campaign wearing white jeans, spiky ankle boots, and nothing else. In addition to her international appeal, perfect bronzed skin, and million-dollar physique, Bündchen’s versatility made her a natural choice for Weitzman.

The advertising campaign will appear in the U.S., Italy, France, England, Dubai, Germany, Spain, and Asia. Fans can watch a behind-the-scenes video on stuartweitzman.com.

Photo: Mario Testino/ Stuart Weitzman

Shady Kate

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While many of her contemporaries have lightened up on the modeling game, or taken to hosting reality TV, Kate Moss is snagging headlines left and right. For starters, she’s in a slew of Spring campaigns (Versace, Givenchy, Stuart Weitzman, and Rag & Bone come to mind). She made waves with her recent covers for Love magazine (she appeared nearly nude in a bathtub), and W‘s March issue (conversely, she was styled like a white lace-clad madonna), and closed out Paris fashion week with a surprise strut down Vuitton’s sultry Fall '13 catwalk. And today, the model sent the Twittersphere abuzz after she read a passage of Fifty Shades of Grey on pal Nick Grimshaw’s UK radio show. (It was all in the name of charity, apparently.) We’re always wary of ubiquity, but somehow, Moss makes it work for her.

Photo: Courtesy of Givenchy

Broadway’s Fairy Godfather: William Ivey Long

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“I’m in charge of all the magic,” says costume designer William Ivey Long—a veritable Broadway legend—of his latest project. Having been in the biz for over thirty years, Long is in the midst of finishing the costumes (over three hundred of them) for Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella, which, starring Laura Osnes, will go into previews on January 25. His studio—a former strip club in Tribeca—is lined with reference images of Catherine de Médicis (she’s his muse for the wicked stepmother), sketches of the flower-, butterfly-, and vegetable-inspired outfits, and material for his fairy-tale looks, like faux fur, rich green brocade, and silver neoprene-lined leather that will be made into suits of armor. “These can’t be everyday clothes!” he quips.

Of course, little about Long is “everyday.” He’s won five Tony awards, created all the costumes for Broadway’s revival of Chicago—now in it’s eighteenth year—including the saucy Roxie Hart dresses for Brooke Shields, Christie Brinkley, and Robin Givens. He designed the flamboyant space suits for Siegfried and Roy’s Mirage Hotel show, dressed the cast of The Producers, and created the playful fifties ensembles for Hairspray. Modestly styled in a navy blazer and khakis (hailing from North Carolina, he’s a Southern boy at heart), Long sits down with Style.com to talk about working with couturier Charles James, living next door to the late artist Louise Bourgeois, and realizing the fantasy that is Cinderella.

Have you always worked out of this studio?
I used to work out of a brownstone in Chelsea. I moved in here three years ago, on Halloween night. I sold my last house to my next-door neighbor, Louise Bourgeois, for her to turn into her museum. She was fantastic and so supportive. She used to come and see the costumes, and near the end, I had to bring them to her. She would give me assignments and ask me to bring her specific things from my travels. I was so excited when I was able to find ancient tapestries, because her family, the Bourgeois family, for centuries restored and cleaned tapestries. She loved looking at all the fabrics, and she would use them to make various things, her little totems. She loved turning existing clothes that she had worn into her sculptures.

Let’s talk slippers. Did you know that, allegedly, Cinderella’s shoes were supposed to be ermine instead of glass? Some say it was an error in the seventeenth-century transcript.

No! Fur slippers would have been very surreal. And comfy. But guess who’s making my glass slippers? Stuart Weitzman! They’re made out of clear plastic. Apparently, in the seventies, when Weitzman first started, he had glass Cinderella high heels in one of his collections. Well, they were plastic made to look like glass.

How did you come to work with Stuart Weitzman?

It’s a complicated thing with producer connections, etc. Usually I don’t have such exalted playmates. Stuart is so charming. He fit the shoe on Laura Osnes’ foot for the first time the other day, and he was just like the prince. But I’m working with eight shops on the actual costumes. I’m in charge of the “magical” dress transformations, so my shops have to be knowledgeable about the intricacies of this and that. Nobody comes onstage to help the actors. They do it themselves. And it doesn’t black out, there’s no puff of smoke. They really do the magic in front of you.

Continue Reading “Broadway’s Fairy Godfather: William Ivey Long” »

Footwear News’ Lifetime Achiever Has The Kate Middleton Vote Locked Up

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According to Stuart Weitzman, earning a lifetime achievement award could be considered a nudge toward an exodus from the industry. “Twenty-six years ago they gave me my first award, which was Man of the Year,” recalled the designer who took home the Lifetime Achievement Award at last night’s 26th Annual Footwear News Achievement Awards held at the Museum of Modern Art. “Now I think they’re trying to retire me.” Despite his jests, the 71-year-old designer (above) shows no signs of slowing down. Selling two million pairs of shoes each year, Weitzman continues to outfit well-heeled women across the globe in his signature 50/50 boots and demure heels. He counts Angelina Jolie, Beyoncé (who even sent in a congratulatory video tribute for Weitzman), and Kate Middleton as fans. Most recently, the latter turned up at London’s Olympic Games in his Corkswoon wedge, turning the stacked style into an instant hit. “She didn’t change her shoes for nine days,” he said. “It was a big deal.”


Among the flurry of footwear fanatics on hand were Miranda Kerr, Tali Lennox, and pop star-turned-designer Fergie, who paired a turquoise Pucci dress with her own Holly pumps. “I love a platform because my husband is so much taller than I am,” the singer admitted. “He’s always leaning over to kiss me.” Even presenter Victor Cruz revealed he’s a “heels guy” and prefers his lady friends in Christian Louboutin or Charlotte Olympia. “I know my stuff,” beamed the New York Giants’ wide receiver. Among the winners of the evening, Charlotte Dellal and Tabitha Simmons (left, with Kerr) took home trophies for Designer of the Year and Style Influencer of the Year respectively, while Rebecca Minkoff earned praise for using Instagram photos in her first print ad campaign (which debuted, by the way, in Style.com/Print). “It was another way that we could connect to our customer and make her feel empowered,” explained Minkoff who, hours earlier, uploaded sandal options for the evening and let her 114k followers decide. No stranger to posting sartorial selfies, Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine lamented over the cons of public forum sharing. “Shoe porn instigates the most heated conversations,” the blogger told Style.com. “The reactions are funny. Amid all the ‘OMG, I love your shoes!’ There’s always the ‘Girl, shave your legs! Why aren’t your toes pedicured!’ It can get pretty hostile.”

Haute Holographics

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At Coachella back in April, rapper Tupac Shakur was brought back to life, in the form of a hologram, to perform on stage with Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre. The impressive technological feat not only ushered in a trend in music (the estates of Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix are reportedly now working on similar holographic performances), but also in art (an exhibition featuring holographic works by the likes of Chuck Close and Ed Ruscha opens at NYC’s New Museum July 18). Fashion is getting in on the action, too.

We’ve spotted holographic accessories everywhere this Resort season, from Proenza Schouler to Narciso Rodriguez to Stuart Weitzman. Jewelry designer Eddie Borgo is on board as well, working with the special treatment in shades of blue and pink. His first-ever handbag is also holographic. It can be worn across the body, as a clutch, or as a fanny pack, and you can even remove the straps and wear them as a necklace.

Photos: Courtesy of Eddie Borgo