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July 30 2014

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33 posts tagged "Suno"

Jeffrey Kalinsky Cares a Whole Lot

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Jeffrey KalinskyJeffrey Kalinsky cares. One need only look to his annual charity events in New York and Atlanta—which, aptly dubbed Jeffrey Fashion Cares, raise money for HIV/AIDS and breast cancer research and LGBTQ organizations—to see that. But does fashion care? Considering the stereotype that the industry’s concerns never reach beyond silhouettes, vanity, and wow! factor (thank you, Prêt-à-Porter and Zoolander), we felt this was a pertinent question. “I think it does care,” answered Kalinsky. “I mean, Michael Kors recently made a $5 million donation to God’s Love We Deliver. Diane von Furstenberg does so much good work, as does Robert Duffy from Marc Jacobs,” he reasoned. “The list goes on. You’re never going to find a profession in which everybody cares. But yes, there are a lot of people in fashion who care.” Glad we could put that debate to rest.

Kalinsky, known for his Jeffrey boutiques in downtown Manhattan and Atlanta, launched his philanthropic gala twenty-two years ago in Georgia. In 2003, after opening his New York store on 14th Street, the retailer brought his charitable evening to the Big Apple. This year’s event, scheduled for Tuesday, April 8 at the 69th Regiment Armory (get your tickets here!), will donate 80 to 90 percent of the funds raised to the Hetrick-Martin Institute, Lambda Legal, ACRIA, and the Point Foundation.

While the 2014 Jeffrey Fashion Cares board includes such bold-faced names as Prabal Gurung and Mickey Boardman, the real star of the benefit is honoree Rob Smith, a tireless gay rights activist and fashion executive. “I feel it’s important for me to honor the real volunteers out there,” said Kalinsky of his choice to highlight Smith, who recently traveled to Russia with Athlete Alley (where he currently serves on the board) to help further LGBT efforts on the ground at the Olympic Games in Sochi. “There are a lot of ‘famous people’ out there who do a lot of good, but Rob is a guy who has worked so hard for charity just because.”

We should also mention that the evening will feature an enticing auction. A trip to Paris, Maggie Smith’s Downton Abbey choker, a Suno tunic, and an Alexander Wang handbag are just a few of the carefully considered items up for grabs. You can get a head start and bid now at GavelAndGrand.com.

The impressive selection of auction pieces shouldn’t be surprising, considering the top-notch mix of wares available in Kalinsky’s stores. His latest find? LVMH Prize finalist Simon Porte Jacquemus, whose brand Kalinsky picked up for Fall. “I loved it because it didn’t seem like it was looking back—it was looking forward,” offered Kalinsky, adding that he both stocks and admires newcomers like Simone Rocha, J.W. Anderson, and Yang Li. So what does it take for a newbie to catch the retailer’s eye? “I have to see the right blend of art and commerce,” he explained. “And I just know it when I see it. I can hear the cash registers ringing.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

EXCLUSIVE: LVMH Announces Its Twelve Fashion Prize Finalists

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LVMH

The panel of experts has spoken, the votes are in, and today we can announce the twelve talents who will move on to the final round of the heated LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition. Atto by Julien Dossena, CG by Chris Gelinas, Gabriele Colangelo, Shayne Oliver’s Hood by Air, Jacquemus by Simon Porte Jacquemus, Miuniku by Nikita and Tina Sutradhar, Thomas Tait, Tillmann Lauterbach, Tim Coppens, Simone Rocha, Suno by Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty, and Vika Gazinskaya will go head-to-head for the award’s 300,000 euro grant. A slideshow of the designers’ looks is available here.

But wait, you might be thinking. Weren’t there only supposed to be ten finalists? Yes, but LVMH’s team of forty industry insiders simply could not decide after surveying the work of the competition’s thirty semifinalists during an event at Paris fashion week. “It’s so hard,” offered Louis Vuitton’s executive vice president Delphine Arnault, who has been spearheading the initiative. “When we compiled the votes, four designers all had the same amount, so we let twelve in. I think it’s good.” We’re sure the finalists would agree.

LVMH

The dozen men’s and womenswear designers, who hail from round the globe, will each have fifteen minutes to present their Fall ’14 collections at the LVMH headquarters in May. Judges including Karl Lagerfeld, Raf Simons, Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Riccardo Tisci, and others will consider their efforts, and later choose a winner. “All the [LVMH Prize] designers are really enthusiastic,” offered Arnault. “I’m sure the contestants are nervous, but at the same time, it’s an amazing opportunity to meet all these people.” In a room filled with powerhouses like that, we’d be nervous, too, but the final twelve can take solace in the fact that at least one prestigious juror has been in their shoes. “Karl [Lagerfeld] started his career after winning a prize, but he told me there were 200,000 applicants, not 1,200 as we’ve had,” relayed Arnault. “Karl even had to sit and draw in front of the judges to prove that someone else hadn’t done his sketches for him.” As for the eighteen semifinalists who didn’t make the cut, they can take solace in the fact that they’re eligible to apply again next year. “I’m sure they must be very disappointed, but I hope they see it as an opportunity. And I hope we helped them to make some key connections in the industry.”

Photos: Courtesy of LVMH

LVMH Fashion Prize Finalists Announced

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Suno, Craig Green, Hood by Air

Back in November, we broke the news of LVMH’s new 300,000-euro LVMH Prize for Young Designers. According to WWD, 1,211 talents applied, and today the short list of thirty semifinalists, who will go on to present their collections to an esteemed panel of experts during Paris fashion week, were announced. CG by Chris Gelinas, Tim Coppens, Suno by Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis, Shayne Oliver’s Hood by Air, and Creatures of the Wind by Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters are among the New York-based brands that made the cut. Notable international names include London’s Craig Green, Simone Rocha, Thomas Tait, Meadham Kirchhoff (designed by Edward Meadham and Benjamin Kirchhoff), and Marques’Almeida (designed by Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida); Paris’ Jacquemus (by Simon Porte Jacquemus) and Atto (by Julien Dossena); Rome’s Stella Jean; and more.

Following the Paris presentations, judges will select ten hopefuls from the group of thirty, and these finalists will continue on to compete for the big prize. The decision, which will be made by a group including Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Humberto Leon, Carol Lim, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, will be announced in May.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com 

The Split-Second Preview: Suno

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The Fall ’14 Ready-to-Wear collections kick off in New York today, and will be followed by the shows in London, Milan, and Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

Suno

WHO: Suno, designed by Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis

WHERE: New York

WHEN: Friday, February 7

WHAT: “New money gypsy with techno modern flair.”— Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis. The designers sent us a peek at one of their Fall ’14 prints, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Suno

Take Five: Tracy Sedino’s Warehouse of Vintage Sunglasses

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Fashion folk are a curious bunch, and we’ve found that they tend to collect equally curious things. In our “Take Five” feature, we get the lowdown on our favorite industry personalities’ most treasured trinkets.

Vintage Linda Farrow Glasses

There won’t be enough sun-filled English days in this lifetime for Tracy Sedino to wear each pair of vintage shades in the Linda Farrow archive. “Oh, my god, I must have thousands,” she said last week at a dinner in New York. Sedino was behind the revival of the Linda Farrow brand, whose namesake designer worked with houses such as Yves Saint Laurent and Emilio Pucci to create glasses in the seventies and eighties. Farrow closed her business to start a family in the late eighties, and her crates of luxurious lenses were stored away in a London warehouse.

Over a decade later, Sedino—then a student at the London College of Fashion—began dating (and has since married) Farrow’s son, Simon Jablon. “His father had some warehouses,” Sedino recalled. “And he asked Simon to get rid of all the stock, because they were getting turned into residential properties. So I went with him, and we found original Pucci and YSL sunglasses piled three-floors high.” Obviously, their discovery couldn’t go to waste, so she and Jablon used it as a jumping-off point and rebooted the house of Linda Farrow. They sold some of the vintage styles but, more notably, began partnering with young talents to turn out glamorous—and often outrageous—designs. (Remember those Jeremy Scott Minnie Mouse shades? That was their doing). Today, the husband-and-wife team continues the company in Farrow’s spirit and makes glasses for everyone from Dries Van Noten, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and Suno to Alexander Wang, Peter Pilotto, and The Row. “We thought there was a massive gap in the market,” said Sedino of her and Jablon’s decision to relaunch Linda Farrow. “You have these big luxury houses that sign licensing deals, but other designers, like Dries, will never do that, because they value their brands too much. We wanted to reinforce what Simon’s mother did in the seventies by working with designers to create eyewear as a fashion accessory, rather than a licensed product.”

Sedino and Jablon celebrated their company’s (and their relationship’s) tenth anniversary this year. And to mark the milestone, the duo have not only offered up a ten-year capsule collection but also opened a pop-up shop in collaboration with BOFFO, right here in NYC. The store, which is located at the Chelsea SuperPier, and open through December 24, boasts a bevy of Linda Farrow’s most covetable products. As for that archive of vintage sunnies, Sedino told us that it’s a constant point of reference. “We don’t want our collections to be too vintage, so we take inspiration from the vintage styles, and incorporate new technology and materials,” she said. Here, Sedino talks us through her five favorite pairs of old-school Linda Farrow frames.

1. “These are acetate Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties. They’re my holiday pair. I love them because the idea and design are fun, and they’re quite comfortable on my face. Ironically, it’s hard for me to find sunglasses that fit—for Asians, it’s difficult to find pairs that sit on the nose bridge. I’ve been wearing these for the last two years, and I’m particularly inspired their shape, because they’re almost like a big chunky Wayfarer. You can really wear them whenever.”

2. “These are Yves Saint Laurent glasses from the early seventies. They’re kind of a round Jackie O style. They’re handmade in acetate, with metal arms. This pair is a one-off, so we don’t have stock anymore. They’re one of my favorite styles, because they’re the perfect size. But I don’t really wear them, because I’m afraid of losing them.”

3. “These are Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties, and they were kind of inspired by Lolita. Whenever stylists call in for Lolita-style frames, we send them these. I wear them all the time in the summer.”

4. “These are amazing. This is another YSL pair from the seventies. They’re not one-of-a-kind—we still have a few—but not many. The lenses are polarized, and because of the orange, they’re my autumn glasses.”

5. “This is the most iconic Linda Farrow style. I love how the sides are beveled. We’ve actually launched a fine-jewelry collection of 18-karat-gold-and-diamond sunglasses, and this is one of the styles we used.”

Photo: John Munro