Style.com

August 27 2014

styledotcom How much is Kendall Jenner going to be everywhere this season? stylem.ag/1qL9eua pic.twitter.com/APRvFQeaKn

Subscribe to Style Magazine
34 posts tagged "Suno"

Take Five: Tracy Sedino’s Warehouse of Vintage Sunglasses

-------

Fashion folk are a curious bunch, and we’ve found that they tend to collect equally curious things. In our “Take Five” feature, we get the lowdown on our favorite industry personalities’ most treasured trinkets.

Vintage Linda Farrow Glasses

There won’t be enough sun-filled English days in this lifetime for Tracy Sedino to wear each pair of vintage shades in the Linda Farrow archive. “Oh, my god, I must have thousands,” she said last week at a dinner in New York. Sedino was behind the revival of the Linda Farrow brand, whose namesake designer worked with houses such as Yves Saint Laurent and Emilio Pucci to create glasses in the seventies and eighties. Farrow closed her business to start a family in the late eighties, and her crates of luxurious lenses were stored away in a London warehouse.

Over a decade later, Sedino—then a student at the London College of Fashion—began dating (and has since married) Farrow’s son, Simon Jablon. “His father had some warehouses,” Sedino recalled. “And he asked Simon to get rid of all the stock, because they were getting turned into residential properties. So I went with him, and we found original Pucci and YSL sunglasses piled three-floors high.” Obviously, their discovery couldn’t go to waste, so she and Jablon used it as a jumping-off point and rebooted the house of Linda Farrow. They sold some of the vintage styles but, more notably, began partnering with young talents to turn out glamorous—and often outrageous—designs. (Remember those Jeremy Scott Minnie Mouse shades? That was their doing). Today, the husband-and-wife team continues the company in Farrow’s spirit and makes glasses for everyone from Dries Van Noten, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and Suno to Alexander Wang, Peter Pilotto, and The Row. “We thought there was a massive gap in the market,” said Sedino of her and Jablon’s decision to relaunch Linda Farrow. “You have these big luxury houses that sign licensing deals, but other designers, like Dries, will never do that, because they value their brands too much. We wanted to reinforce what Simon’s mother did in the seventies by working with designers to create eyewear as a fashion accessory, rather than a licensed product.”

Sedino and Jablon celebrated their company’s (and their relationship’s) tenth anniversary this year. And to mark the milestone, the duo have not only offered up a ten-year capsule collection but also opened a pop-up shop in collaboration with BOFFO, right here in NYC. The store, which is located at the Chelsea SuperPier, and open through December 24, boasts a bevy of Linda Farrow’s most covetable products. As for that archive of vintage sunnies, Sedino told us that it’s a constant point of reference. “We don’t want our collections to be too vintage, so we take inspiration from the vintage styles, and incorporate new technology and materials,” she said. Here, Sedino talks us through her five favorite pairs of old-school Linda Farrow frames.

1. “These are acetate Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties. They’re my holiday pair. I love them because the idea and design are fun, and they’re quite comfortable on my face. Ironically, it’s hard for me to find sunglasses that fit—for Asians, it’s difficult to find pairs that sit on the nose bridge. I’ve been wearing these for the last two years, and I’m particularly inspired their shape, because they’re almost like a big chunky Wayfarer. You can really wear them whenever.”

2. “These are Yves Saint Laurent glasses from the early seventies. They’re kind of a round Jackie O style. They’re handmade in acetate, with metal arms. This pair is a one-off, so we don’t have stock anymore. They’re one of my favorite styles, because they’re the perfect size. But I don’t really wear them, because I’m afraid of losing them.”

3. “These are Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties, and they were kind of inspired by Lolita. Whenever stylists call in for Lolita-style frames, we send them these. I wear them all the time in the summer.”

4. “These are amazing. This is another YSL pair from the seventies. They’re not one-of-a-kind—we still have a few—but not many. The lenses are polarized, and because of the orange, they’re my autumn glasses.”

5. “This is the most iconic Linda Farrow style. I love how the sides are beveled. We’ve actually launched a fine-jewelry collection of 18-karat-gold-and-diamond sunglasses, and this is one of the styles we used.”

Photo: John Munro

Stop-Motion Catwalk: Suno

-------

Friday night, Suno’s Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis unveiled their “African maximalist” Spring ’14 collection in New York. Before the new looks hit the runway, director and videographer Meagan Cignoli trailed the duo as they put the final touches on things. “We actually started with African Bakuba cloths, and somehow took them to a whole other place,” says Beatty of the design process.

Cignoli’s stop-motion video, the first in a series commissioned by Swarovski, makes its exclusive debut here. We’ll be premiering two more films from the project—which highlights New York-based Swarovski Collective designers including Prabal Gurung and Wes Gordon—later this week.

The Split-Second Preview: Suno

-------

The Spring ’14 collections are under way in New York, and will be followed by the shows in London, Milan, and Paris. Before their new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire selection of Spring ’14 previews is available here.

SUNO

WHO: Suno, designed by Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty

WHERE: New York

WHEN: Friday, September 6

WHAT: “African Maximalism—a little bit tribal, a little forties, a lot of color!”— Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty. The designers sent us a glimpse of their Spring collection, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Suno

Suno Keeps On Giving

-------

Max Osterweis , Shantell Martin, and Erin Beatty

In addition to vivid palettes and eclectic prints, one might say that altruism has become part of Suno‘s DNA. Five years ago, Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty founded their New York-based label in order to help create jobs in Kenya (they currently produce a portion of their garments there, as well as in Peru and India). But the duo decided that they wanted to make a difference in their own community, too. And with their latest project—a series of cotton T-shirts ($75) and silk dresses ($395) designed in collaboration with artist Shantell Martin—they’re doing just that. Twenty-five percent of the proceeds from the limited-edition capsule, which will be available from today on SunoNY.com, will be donated to Apple Arts—a Brooklyn-based charity that offers free arts education to children living in New York’s homeless shelters. “I think we have always tried to give back in certain ways, whether it be the way we produce or something else,” offered Beatty. “So this time, we were trying to give back locally,” added Osterweis. Continue Reading “Suno Keeps On Giving” »

Albertus Swanepoel and Co. Put Their Heads Together

-------

Albertus Swanepoel hats on head forms by Cushnie et Ochs, Irene Neuwirth, Richard Chai, and Suno

South African-born, New York-based milliner Albertus Swanepoel has been creating hats for such brands as Proenza Schouler, Jason Wu, Alexander Wang, Marc by Marc Jacobs, and Club Monaco since 2004. So today, a few fellow CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund alums—many of whom have sent his custom toppers down their catwalks—have made a little something for him. The hatter will open his very first exhibition, A Milliner’s Story, this evening at downtown boutique Odin, and his wares will rest on bespoke hat forms by the likes of Suno (above, bottom left), Band of Outsiders, Richard Chai (above, bottom right), and more. For instance, Cushnie et Ochs designers Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs turned out a noggin made from black snakeskin (above, top left), and Irene Neuwirth created a pink face adorned with semiprecious stones (above, top right). “I didn’t really give them any direction, and I was very impressed with [the designers'] craftsmanship and technical skills,” Swanepoel told Style.com. “Those things are very important to me.” Continue Reading “Albertus Swanepoel and Co. Put Their Heads Together” »