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April 21 2014

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6 posts tagged "Takashi Murakami"

Takashi Murakami’s California Dreams

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Takashi Murakami has had a big week in L.A. On Tuesday, the artist premiered Jellyfish Eyes—his first live-action-meets-CGI feature film—at MOCA. And last night, he bowed an exhibition of new paintings and sculpture at Blum & Poe. Built on the ideas he presented for Ego, his 2012 exhibit in Qatar, the show—titled Arhat—includes scaled paintings, wall-mounted sculptures, and steel sculptures that combine his signature slick pop with newer self-referential themes. “Before, I saw how consumers know Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons, and I worked in the same place,” Murakami said of his previous collections. But it was the 2011 tsunami that deeply affected his work—and ultimately elicited a shift. “I totally stepped back from the mainstream and really was focusing personally and on identity.”

Guests such as Co’s Stephanie Danan and Justin Kern, Benedikt Taschen, and Eva and Michael Chow toasted the artist’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery—and his first major presentation in the U.S. in over four years. Peter Pilotto, in town for the British Fashion Council’s London Show Rooms, expressed a particularly keen appreciation for the artist’s creations. “It’s all about craft; we always look super closely at the techniques and how he does it,” he said, marveling at the intense, intricate artistry in each piece. And as a fellow lover of graphic prints, one might say he and Murakami are kindred spirits. “When you see those paintings, you really have to get into them. There is so much information—I really analyze it.”

Arhat runs from April 13 through May 25 at Blum & Poe, 2727 South La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90034, 310-836-2062.

Photos: Stefanie Keenan/ Getty Images

Gucci And Scorsese Take On Cannes, Gaga In Black, Louboutin’s Glass Slippers, And More…

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Gucci and Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation are set to unveil a new version of Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in America at the Cannes Film Festival next month, toasted with a dinner and party at the Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc thrown by Gucci creative director Frida Giannini, Vanity Fair editor in chief Graydon Carter, and PPR chairman and chief executive officer François-Henri Pinault. [WWD]

Lady Gaga has reportedly joined the cast of Men in Black 3, alongside Tim Burton and Justin Bieber. The film’s director, Barry Sonnenfeld, has “confirmed that she will appear on an alien surveillance board,” but it is not yet known whether she will act as herself or play a character—though the difference between those two, one imagines, would be slight. [Vogue U.K.]

In celebration of the re-release of the Disney classic Cinderella this fall, Christian Louboutin is designing his own version of a glass slipper, to debut this summer. “I have been so lucky to have crossed paths with Cinderella, an icon who is so emblematic to the shoe world as well as the dream world,” says Louboutin. [WWD]

Japanese artist and Marc Jacobs collaborator Takashi Murakami will open a new branch of his company, Kaikai Kiki, complete with a gallery in Germany tomorrow, coinciding with Berlin Gallery Weekend. The new outpost, named Hidari Zingaro Berlin, is Murakami’s first exhibition space outside of Japan. [Art Info]

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Where Marc Jacobs And Louis Vuitton Meet

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This year, Marc Jacobs celebrates 15 years as the creative director of Louis Vuitton. And today in Paris, Louis Vuitton—Marc Jacobs, a comprehensive exhibition that explores two innovators and their roles in Vuitton’s 143-year history, opens to the public at the Louvre’s Musée des Arts Décoratifs. (If you can’t make it to Paris before the September 16 closing date, Rizzoli’s accompanying tome, with historical and critical essays by curator Pamela Golbin and Jo-Ann Furniss, a look back through the collections organized by Jacobs and Katie Grand, and more, arrives in April; it can be preordered here.)

“When we were talking through the project, what came out was we really wanted to portray Louis almost like a black and white picture, whereas Marc is like a Technicolor film,” said curator Pamela Golbin, a celebrated author, fashion historian, and the Chief Curator of Fashion and Textiles at Les Arts Décoratifs. The exhibition is divided between a historical view of founder Louis Vuitton himself and a contemporary view of Jacobs’ creation of the house’s ready-to-wear, which he founded in 1997 and has stewarded since. Here, Style.com talks to Golbin about creating the exhibition and the history of the influential house.

What does this exhibition say about the development of Marc’s career at Vuitton?

First of all, what’s so interesting about this exhibition is that it follows two men, so it’s about Louis and he has a whole floor, and then also a second floor is dedicated to Marc. When it came to Marc, it was important for him to be very involved in the project. I did not want this to be a retrospective; it’s more a celebration of what Marc has done in the last 15 years at Vuitton. And it’s incredible that it has already been 15 years. The exhibition is more about the vision that he created for the brand than anything else. And that vision is quite large. It’s not just about designing clothes. Obviously accessories are important, but so is advertising, his artistic collaborations, and just his overall cultural vision. So Marc’s floor begins with Marc’s World. We essentially opened up his head and we did a self-portrait of Marc through all of the cultural influences that he’s had and that he uses for his design process. So it’s like a giant Tumblr page with still images and video images of everything and anything that has influenced him over the years. It’s not at all chronological. It’s thematic. And he even came up with the titles for each of the cases.

Why did you want to steer away from doing a retrospective?
The idea was by no means to say, “OK, in 1997 he did this and he did that.” His story is not chronological. His story is really about an energy and an attitude. He turned Louis Vuitton from a brand into a house. And so what we tried to get across were the steps that he took to get there and important moments. And more importantly, just really his fashion vision for Louis Vuitton that, when he arrived, was already 143 years old. He really created a fashion entity within a luxury brand. Continue Reading “Where Marc Jacobs And Louis Vuitton Meet” »

The New Face Of Brit Pop

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For her upcoming issue of Pop, Dasha Zhukova scored a big get: Twitter queen (and occasional singer) Britney Spears, who appears on multiple covers of the magazine. Todd Cole shot Brit-Brit for the glossy, and Takashi Murakami gave her the full kawaii Japanimation treatment. (We hear cartoon stickers will also appear throughout the mag.) Why Spears? “She’s feminine, sassy, strong-willed, determined: all the things a great Pop icon should be,” Zhukova told us from Moscow. “Couple that with some Japanese swimsuits and a Rodarte wedding gown and I think she is pretty much Pop personified!” Apparently the idea arose when Zhukova was discussing the idea of manga characters with Murakami—and voila, a cover star is born. The mag will be out September 1—it also includes a collaboration with Cindy Sherman, who reinterprets the Chanel woman, an interview with Hillary Clinton by Barbara Bush (!), and stories on Barbara Kruger, MNDR, and Martha Stewart (!!)—and we’ve got your exclusive first look at two of the covers, above.

Photos: Todd Cole/Courtesy of Pop

Artists And Labels: The Continuing Story

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If Marc builds it, they will come. The contemporary artist/fashion label complex, that is, which Jacobs sent to new heights with his accessory collaborations with Louis Vuitton. Yes, artists and designers had collaborated before—including Dalí and Schiaparelli way back when—but the runaway success of Louis Vuitton’s Murakami bags (and the follow-up Richard Prince “joke” bags) has given contemporary artists a new form to play with and, just as importantly, a new revenue stream. The latest is the conceptual art star Jenny Holzer, who’s teaming up with Keds to create kicks this summer. (Artist’s canvas, taken literally.) The high-top and low-top styles are emblazoned with PROTECT ME FROM WHAT I WANT, a phrase from Holzer’s text series Survival. They’ll be available online and at select Bloomingdale’s locations in July. The footwear brand is giving back to the art world, too: Keds is sponsoring the Whitney’s summer season.
$70 to $75, available at select Bloomingdale’s locations and www.keds.com beginning July 8.

PLUS: Click below for a few of our favorite recent art/fashion collabs. Continue Reading “Artists And Labels: The Continuing Story” »