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July 26 2014

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7 posts tagged "Tenzin Wild"

EXCLUSIVE: Behind The Scenes At ICB’s Digital Fashion Show

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Backstage at a fashion show? Been there, hundreds of times. But backstage at a digital fashion show? Never. On the Friday before Labor Day, Prabal Gurung and his ICB team gathered at a studio in Williamsburg to shoot the label’s second digital show, which goes live online tomorrow morning, and I was happy to sign up for the meta experience. If a show is virtual, does a backstage exist?

ICB was one of the original brands to sign onto KCD’s digital fashion show initiative last season—and its sophomore effort promises to be a more engaging experience than the first. Gurung hired Magnus Berger and Tenzin Wild as creative directors, and the Last Magazine co-founders (who joined a crew that included stylist Tiina Laakkonen, Gurung’s show producer Stacy Striegel, and at least 50 other fashion professionals, six of whom were wielding cameras), produced a set inspired by Richard Serra sculptures. Instead of walking down a straight runway with a plain white background, the models navigate through a maze. Part of the pleasure at a runway show is seeing the reactions of the people around you. Until KCD signs a partnership with Second Life, we’ll content ourselves with the Serra-esque walls.

Here, some photos from the “backstage.”


Photos: Courtesy of ICB

The Innerwear Comes Out

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For the past few seasons, lingerie designer Araks Yeramyan has brought on the likes of Richard Chai, Gia Coppola, Sally Singer, and Julie Gilhart to help shoot her lookbook. For the third installment, she handed out disposable cameras to yet another group of friends and supporters, including actress Michelle Williams, Alexa Chung, Tenzin Wild, Tracy Feith, and Creatures of the Wind’s Shane Gabier and Chris Peters.

“I make a wish list every season. I start with friends, or friends of friends, then add people I don’t know, but who I feel are in some way connected with the brand,” the designer explains of the process. “Some people I have no idea how to get to, but we try anyway—it’s fun.” Williams, however, was no shot in the dark. The Oscar-nominated actress has been a longtime Araks customer and, as Yeramyan admits, “She was the first person I placed on the list for this book.”

As fate would have it, Williams photographed her portion of the project at the Park Hyatt Tokyo—the same hotel that Lost in Translation was filmed at, in which star Scarlett Johansson wears Araks underthings. Here, Style.com has an exclusive first look at the final shot from Williams before it is officially unveiled along with the rest of the images at a private party in New York Wednesday night.

Photo: Courtesy of Araks

Pleather Principle

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“Vegan. Vegan. Leather. Vegan. Leather. Leather.” That was Victoria Bartlett last night after dinner, playing show-and-tell over a small display of her Spring 2012 VPL shoes set up in the corner at Gemma’s Wine Room. However, it was the animal product-free portion of the collection that served as the reason for this happy and homey little get-together for friends like co-host Julie Gilhart, Hannelore Knuts, and dashing Last Magazine duo Magnus Berger and Tenzin Wild.

The designer has been a fur-free, vegetarian animal lover for almost three decades—despite her very English roots. “Oh, I grew up with my mum serving me liver, cow’s tongue, rabbit. You name it,” she said. (Though high fashion’s other purveyor of vegan accessories Stella McCartney is also English, and Bartlett noted that former McCartney BFF and fellow Brit Phoebe Philo was also vegan back in the day.)

Bartlett had long since made her peace with leather as a by-product but was spurred on by socialite and fashionable free spirit Arden Wohl to toss some non-leather options into the mix, and into an apparent market void. “Arden basically told me there’s not that much fashion stuff out there except for Stella,” said Bartlett. For Spring, Wohl and other conscious shoppers can choose between VPL’s strappy low wedges in faux leather—good solid Italian-made stuff that took Bartlett a year to find—in colors like putty, buff, and forest, and bright neoprene sandals with zips up the back.

This vegan venture is just a first phase. In the offing for VPL are fake leather bags and even coats. But don’t expect Bartlett to be flogging them as a marketing gimmick. The mix of cruelty-free and vero cuoio isn’t strict and neither is she. “It can be a selling point for people who want it,” she said. “But otherwise, it’s just fashion.”

Photo: Courtesy of VPL

Rusch Hour: Toasting Montauk’s New “Summer Camp”

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With its fishing village roots, robust surf scene, and long association with art world figures like Andy Warhol, Montauk has always been the cooler alternative to the Hamptons—and while some may grumble that the place is becoming too popular, it still stands safely apart from its over-gentrified neighbors along Route 27. One of the attractions of Ruschmeyer’s, a newly renovated “summer camp” from Ben Pundole, formerly of the Mondrian Hotel Group, and Rob McKinley, who opened the nearby Surf Lodge a few summers ago, is that it fits right in with the area’s laid-back mood. It features a rustic lakefront setting, a ring of casual but stylishly appointed guest cabins, and a restaurant where Pundole and McKinley have partnered with the team behind lower Manhattan’s Fat Radish to put a focus on fish and other locally sourced ingredients (don’t miss the clam pizza if it’s on the list of nightly specials). The property also houses a nautically themed late-night hangout, the Electric Eel (below), which could put a serious crimp in your early-morning surfing plans. For those who insist on exercise, there are yoga sessions, a rack of handsome bikes, and, more essentially, a massage room, among other options. Ruschmeyer’s opened over Memorial Day weekend with a friends-and-family gathering that included a Saturday night dinner attended by Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber, Rogan Gregory, Pamela Love, Magnus Berger, and Tenzin Wild. After the meal, Waris Ahluwalia stepped outside to take a call with his newest collaborators, the alternative hip-hop group The Cool Kids. For an upcoming movie role, the jeweler and actor is adding the title of rapper to his résumé.


For reservations and more info, see www.visitruschmeyers.com or call (631) 668-2885.

Photos: David X Prutting / BFAnyc.com

The Fashion Girls Of Japan Organize A Benefit For Japan

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The fashion community of New York has been swift in organizing benefits, special products, and donations to Japan in the weeks since the earthquake and Pacific tsunami devastated the country. But for some industry players, the disaster is closer to home. For those Japanese and Japanese-American designers, buyers, and executives, the event is even more personal—and with their newly formed Fashion Girls for Japan, they’re doing something to help.

Spearheaded by Kikka Hanazawa (president of VPL), Tomoko Ogura (women’s fashion director of Barneys Co-Op), Stella Ishii (owner of the News showroom), and Kyoko Kageyama of 3.1 Phillip Lim, who was in Tokyo during the quake, and with the support of Julie Gilhart, Fashion Girls for Japan has organized a two-day sample sale, 60+ Designers/60+ Rolling Racks, to raise money for the Red Cross, the Mayor’s Fund, and the Japan Society’s Japan Earthquake Relief Fund. What will you find? Exactly what the name promises: More than 60 racks of clothes at deep, sample-sale discounts (starting at 50 percent off retail) from more than 60 participating designers, including Altuzarra, Derek Lam, Diane von Furstenberg, Proenza Schouler, and Thakoon. A $5 ticket is all it takes to get entry to the two-day sale, which will be held next weekend at the Bowery Hotel Terrace. For more details, visit fashiongirlsforjapan.com. And because no event is official without its own logo, the group drafted Magnus Berger and Tenzin Wild of Berger & Wild—designers and founders of The Last Magazine]to create a cool a graphic as we’ve seen yet (left). Here’s hoping for a T-shirt (well—another).

Illustration: Berger & Wild/fashiongirlsforjapan.com