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April 20 2014

styledotcom Must be the night fever. stylem.ag/1ncyFYw

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26 posts tagged "Terence Koh"

Net-a-Porter’s True Originals

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Marina Abramovic's jumpsuits for Net-a-PorterAnyone pondering the future of couture needs to check out what Net-a-Porter is cooking up for fall. On Wednesday, Net-a-Porter’s fashion director, Holli Rogers, invited a handful of editors to the Palais de Tokyo to catch a glimpse of how the e-tailer is moving the needle: Come September, the site will be selling one-off couture-inspired creations by contemporary artists George Condo, Terence Koh, Vik Muniz, Marina Abramovic, and Mickalene Thomas. Dubbed Art Capsul, the project was curated by Stacy Engman, an art-world veteran and fashion devotee, who approached the artists about creating garments inspired by the tradition of haute couture. “I wanted the artists to use their artwork to conceive a garment from beginning to end,” said Engman. “The process in fashion and in art is very similar in that both artists and designers are striving to create visual experiences that did not exist before. But this project is about contemporary art, and that is about the future. It’s just that this is art that can be worn.” No fashion designer is affiliated with this project.

As it turns out, Abramovic had been mulling the idea for a couple of decades: Her “jumpsuit of the century” is actually a set of seven jumpsuits in various colors, inspired by the planets. (Mars is blue; Mercury, red; Venus, white; etc.) She strategically incorporated magnets into the wares for their energetic properties. Koh dreamed up a coat covered in 20,000 pearls of different sizes, while Condo delivered a cheeky little topper with fur trim and pom-pom ties. “The whole point was to challenge people’s ideas about what we’re doing,” explained Rogers. “It’s art, it’s fashion, and you can wear it if it suits you.” Not to mention your wallet: These pieces are slated to be sold at “art-world prices.” And while the price tags for these one-of-a-kind wares aren’t yet confirmed, we have a feeling that Dolce & Gabbana’s Fall ’13 Lava dress, which is set to retail on Net-a-Porter this month for about $48,873, might just seem like a steal in comparison.

Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-porter

Hong Kong, They Love You

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This weekend, 28-year-old Pablo Ganguli, the flamboyant curator of culture and creative characters, took his Liberatum festival for the arts to Hong Kong, co-curated with pianist Rosey Chan. Despite the endless black rain, the nonprofit three-day event, which featured lively talks with Pharrell Williams, world-renowned producer William Orbit, and Paul Schrader as well as installations by filmmaker Mike Figgis and a performance piece by Terence Koh, attracted editors and culture enthusiasts from around the globe. On Saturday night, the festival’s participants and spectators joined Ferragamo at Hong Kong’s Kee Club for dinner, dancing, and a surprise performance by one of the weekend’s most glamorous headliners, Spanish actress and Almodóvar muse Rossy de Palma. “As long as I can remember, Rossy has influenced me with her dynamic character,” Ganguli said.

The talk quickly turned to the festival’s temporary home. “When people talk about China these days, they usually talk about money,” said Vogue China’s editor in chief, Angelica Cheung, who turned up in a smart black Lanvin look. “The art scene in China, as everybody knows, is very active. But everything here is often commercial, commercial, commercial! More people should be doing things like this,” she added, noting that she particularly enjoyed Stephen Webster’s lecture, which took place at the festival earlier that day. (Webster, as it turned out, was in Hong Kong for reasons commercial as well as artistic: In addition to the fair, he was in town for a show of his jewels at Lane Crawford. “I brought all my best stuff because I really want to test it out here,” he said.)

De Palma made her grand entrance in a sequined Custo look, fluttering a black fan. “It was always my fantasy to come to Hong Kong. I am obsessed with China!” she said. It was her first time in the city, but her burlesque performance included an improvised homage: “Hong Kong, my darling, I love you!”

Photo: Courtesy of Liberatum

Buying Brooklyn: The Art Edition

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For the style set that insists on local food, local booze, and locally sourced designs, here’s local art. The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) kicks off its eighth annual BAMart Silent Auction tomorrow, and honorary curator Beth Rudin DeWoody selected pieces made by artists either based in Brooklyn or who have previously collaborated with BAM. They include Nate Lowman, Richard Prince, and Terence Koh. Polaroid portraits of Dolly Parton, Keith Haring, and Bianca Jagger may go quickly, but we’re told that a few other artists’ works are set to be the big-ticket items here. Among them, a piece (pictured) by Mickalene Thomas (whose portrait of Michelle Obama was the first painting of the First Lady to be acquired by the National Portrait Gallery), an ink and graphite work by Matthew Ritchie, and an etching (Plate Distortion II) by Tauba Auerbach. The works are currently on display at the Dorothy W. Levitt Lobby of the Peter Jay Sharp Building at BAM and viewable online. The auction, supporting BAM initiatives, launches tomorrow on Paddle8.com and runs through April 22.

Art: Mickalene Thomas

Dinner On The House

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Fashion week presents a particular problem to any scheduler: When? “Fashion week’s so nuts,” designer Waris Ahluwalia admitted. “I didn’t have an open night.” So when he went to host an “intimate” (25—which turned into 45—person) dinner to celebrate his presentation at CIRCA’s Lincoln Center accessories lounge, he decided to bat cleanup, and invite friends to supper after the end of the week. It worked. Last night, CIRCA CEO Chris Del Gatto and Stephanie Winston Wolkoff hosted Johan Lindeberg, Scott Campbell, Veronica Webb, Sophie Théallet, Aaron Young, Terence Koh, Carlos Quirarte, and Ahluwalia’s mother, Darshan (“the guest of honor, always”) piled into Tiny’s in Tribeca for a last-minute dinner toasting House of Waris’ Spring jewelry and scarf collections. “A downtown celebration for an uptown exhibition,” he called it.

The collection being celebrated marks the second time that the House of Waris—known largely for its jewelry—has forayed into scarves. At a follow-up visit at his studio today, the designer explained that the two categories only seem different. They’re both, he reasoned, about keeping craftsmanship alive for a new generation—of craftspeople, as well as of customers. (The Rajastani embroiderers who work on his hand-loomed cashmere scarves now have their hands so full from his business that they’ve stopped working with any other.) This season sees a major uptick in the number of scarf designs offered, with many motifs carrying over from the jewelry collection. They range from the simple—a gorgeous plain taupe cashmere scarf with embroidered border—to the ornate, with chains picked out in contrast thread weaving their way over the whole. They have a richness—and a price tag—consistent with the hours of work they take to complete. But luckily for entry-level fans, batik-dyed cotton-silk scarves start at $300.

Photo: Patrick McMullan

On Sale: Material Heels

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In an effort to help offset the cost of the most expensive disaster in history, a dedicated group of New Yorkers braved the elements last night to show their support for Japan at a fundraiser co-hosted by Martha Stewart and Wynton Marsalis. At Reika Yo Alexander’s En Japanese Brasserie, guests including Hilary Swank, Zac Posen (left, with Stewart), and Waris Ahluwalia checked their winter wear at the door and headed to check out the silent auction items.

Art made up a big part of the evening’s offerings: photographs and paintings by the likes of François Nars, Julian Schnabel, Laurie Simmons, and Terence Koh decorated one wall. That last was mulling an acquisition as well as a donation. “If I get to leave here with one thing,” Koh said, “it would be the Yoko Ono piece.” But with a fashion-heavy crowd like this, no surprise that the item attracting the most attention was a pair of gold Louis Vuitton heels (right). They came with a little something extra: the signature of their original owner, Madonna. “I thought about taking the Madonna shoes, cutting them in half, and displaying them Damien Hirst-style,” Michael Stipe mused. And while we can’t imagine that she and the Material Girl have quite the same taste in chic, even Stewart was eyeing the pair. “Madonna’s shoes, of course,” she told Style.com about the item she most coveted. “But they are a little too small for me.”

Photos: Jonathan Ziegler / Patrick McMullan.com