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August 1 2014

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2 posts tagged "The Line"

The Life of the Party Throws One of His Own

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Hanuk, in front of his work at his opening at The Line

If it was Monday night and you were in an apartment just like yours, only infinitely nicer and better situated, then you’d found yourself at the opening reception of Paintings by Hanuk (one name only, please). Because Hanuk is an inescapable enthusiast of the New York party scene, you were shoulder to shoulder with half of the people you’d find out on any given night: photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and Vogue editor Sally Singer (cohosts, with art PR Bettina Prentice), designers Prabal Gurung, Eddie Borgo, and Camilla Staerk, TV personality Bevy Smith, W‘s Vanessa Lawrence, and everyone else Hanuk has, by way of his party photos, made a momentary celebrity. (The artist, in fact, was flitting around, grouping portraits and snapping as usual—”It wouldn’t be a party without it,” one guest quipped—despite being the main attraction himself.) Hanuk is so well-known as a party documentarian—his signature shot includes him kissing his subject on the cheek, and he’s bussed everyone from James Franco to Philip Crangi to Mickey Boardman—that it might have been news to a few of the attendees that he paints at all. But there, on a large wall at The Line, Vanessa Traina Snow’s apartment-turned-store, were thirty canvases in not-quite-matching pairs. They are brightly colored flat planes with undulating shapes and dots, a bit like Miró filtered through pop. All around, would-be buyers were calling out the color combinations of their favorites.

Before painting, before photography, Hanuk trained as a fashion designer. (He once won an Ecco Domani Fashion Foundation grant for his collection.) But life wended him away from toiles and toward canvas. “I didn’t want to make clothes anymore,” he said last night. “You know, I love making clothes. But that shit costs, like, $8,000. No one’s going to buy it. So I said, You know what? Painting.”

Those paintings, when sold as pairs, did in fact cost $8,000. But Hanuk loved the idea of them splitting up, having them find new partners and new homes, so they were sold individually, too. He was visibly energized by the prospect of new meetings and new acquaintances being made between them. Which, no coincidence, could also describe his entire social M.O., not to mention his party. (He is forever introducing one partygoer to another as he smashes them together to take a picture.) “Like with a key?” he said mischievously when the idea was presented to him. And with that, and camera held high overhead, he dove into a new crowd for the next photo op.

For information, visit hanuk.com.

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

Vanessa Traina Draws THE LINE

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Protagonist

Vanessa Traina is a busy bee. Somewhere between styling Joseph Altuzarra’s Spring ’14 runway and preparing to head to the shows in Paris, Traina’s found time to serve as the executive creative director of THE LINE—a luxury e-tailer that launches today and features a tightly edited selection of clothing, beauty products, and home goods. Handpicked by Traina, the site’s stock includes what the stylist calls “quintessentials”—that is, pieces that are clean, simple, and, above all, timeless. “With all of the fast fashion today, we felt the need to strip down and get back to the basics,” Traina said. “We are not aiming to bring you the hottest trend of the season; we are presenting items that are elevated yet familiar.”

One not-so-familiar brand is Protagonist (above), which, designed by Kate Wendelborn is launching exclusively with THE LINE. Protagonist captures THE LINE’s minimalist focus: brushed wool pullovers, crisp white blouses, and boxy tunics (in shades of black, white, and blush) look current yet trend-proof.

Other brands featured include Reed Krakoff, Rodin Olio Lusso (best known for its cult-favorite beauty oil), interiors range Andrianna Shamaris, J.W. Anderson, Assouline, and Vince, among others. “We are very excited about the brands that we have on board,” Traina said. “We essentially wanted to create the perfect, seasonless wardrobe—those items that you can throw on no matter the day, time, or season.”

Photo: Courtesy of The Line