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April 19 2014

styledotcom Doing it up, Hong Kong homecoming-style: stylem.ag/1h7CIgC

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11 posts tagged "The Next Big Thing Fall ’14"

The Next Big Thing: Ryan Lo, Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

Ryan Lo

Label: Ryan Lo

Need to Know: Born in Hong Kong and showing for the first time outside of Lulu Kennedy’s Fashion East, Ryan Lo presented his playful collection titled Orange Is the New Pink in London’s Tate Modern as part of NewGen. With strong industry support—from Susie Lau writing his press releases to working with super-stylist Charlotte Stockdale’s Chaos Fashion on styling, Lo’s presentation was a girly nod to Americana that encompassed his ongoing focus on romantic fantasy and love. A distinct sense of fun was felt throughout, with smiling and relaxed models showing off gold and silver quilted and frilled skirts and jackets paired with multicolored sneakers with diamanté details, made in collaboration with Swear. Elongated dresses in gray or black-and-white knits or pink glittery Lurex had a more grown-up and polished feel, but that was quickly balanced with pink and orange shimmering fabrics and scrunched-up swan down-lined capes. Standout looks included an eggshell long knit dress underneath a frilled long cardigan of the same color worn with yellow sneakers and topped with a Stetson cowboy hat, and an orange transparent blouse over a pink scrunched-up skirt with a pink cowboy hat on top.

He Says: “This season we polished my woman. I worked with a team of women, and you can see that in the collection. They are no longer girls; they are chic and sexy, with bare legs and a cool attitude. My collections are always about love, and this started with Pocahontas. She was running, painting colors on the wind, and fell into a time vortex trying to find her lover.”

Where to Find It: Opening Ceremony, VFiles in New York, K3, Beams in Japan.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

The Next Big Thing: Faustine Steinmetz, Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

Faustine Steinmetz

Label: Faustine Steinmetz

Need to know: Parisian designer Faustine Steinmetz previewed Fall 2014, her third collection, this London fashion week in the NEWGEN showrooms in Somerset House. Steinmetz graduated from a starry Central Saint Martins MA class in 2011 that included Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida of Marques’Almeida, Phoebe English, and Maarten Van Der Horst. Since then she has worked steadily from her studio in East London, placing an emphasis on new and different ways of using yarn, shredding, curling, and embroidering her way to a unique fabric.

For Fall, Steinmetz turned her focus to hand-weaving, with a range of singular reworked garments that looked deceptively familiar. Up close, one Burberry-esque trenchcoat turned out to be a blend of rayon and copper, and what looked like classic blue jeans could in fact be scrunched together and adjusted to the body. “I wanted to reproduce the everyday pieces and give them an almost haute couture feel,” she told Style.com, grabbing a handful of mock-blue denim to demonstrate the pliability of the unusual weave. Steinmetz collects vintage Issey Miyake wares, and this collection was inspired by Miyake’s Pleats Please collections, particularly in how they blend wearability with the conceptual.

She says: “I love deformed things and the uncanny,” Steinmetz explained. “I think it’s really interesting when you see something that you know very well, but then it’s suddenly made in a different way. Anything that takes you a second to see and that challenges your perception fascinates me.”

Where to find it: LN-CC in London; Optitude and Isetan in Japan; and in the U.S., exclusively at Opening Ceremony.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

The Next Big Thing: Palmer//Harding, Fall ‘14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

palmer//harding

Label: Palmer//Harding, designed by Levi Palmer and Matthew Harding

Need to know: Levi Palmer and Matthew Harding, who met on the menswear BA at Central Saint Martins, have been steadily developing the white shirt since the inception of their label in 2011. An obsession with construction, quality, and fit has seen Palmer//Harding move the classic white shirt through several seasons, and now it feels like their minimalistic brand has come of age. For Fall ’14, the duo showed twenty-eight looks, only twelve of which featured shirts. The rest of the collection was given over to wide trousers, streamlined miniskirts, and elegant and more mature outerwear, all marked by the same restraint and quiet beauty.

New colors were introduced for Fall, too. There were splashes of chartreuse and carmine against the backdrop of pristine paper-white. “We were calling it ‘highlighter yellow,’” the designers explained. “For the trousers and the simpler pieces, we looked to the sculptor Richard Serra, specifically how he treated his metallic monolithic sculptures. For us, it was a nice synergy with the new colors and fabrics.”

All in all, this was an impressive evolution for Palmer//Harding, one that proved that simple ideas can translate into consummate closet staples.

They say:“We were thinking about paper, and we started to think about things like rule books, too,” Palmer told Style.com. “We’ve spent the past two years really learning about craft and techniques to make the most beautiful shirts. So now we thought: Let’s throw the rule book out, and let’s have fun and push it as far as we could.”

Where to find it: Fivestory in New York, Ikram in Boston, Dover Street Market in London and Tokyo, and online at my-wardrobe.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Palmer//Harding

The Next Big Thing: Maria ke Fisherman, Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

mariakefisherman

Label: Maria ke Fisherman, designed by Victor Alonso and Maria Lemus

Need to know: This Madrid-based pair has a penchant for spinning together hyper-techy, nineties-influenced clubwear—the kind of stuff a self-styling, self-mocking, Internet-era Millennial would pair with whatever they found at VFiles and Beacon’s Closet for a late night out in Bushwick. For its latest lineup, the brand, which launched for Spring 2011, takes the cyperpunk sports theme to a new place with some not-so-new-at-all—and quite cheekily reimagined—old-school references. Sand-and-pastel-pink-shaded 3-D printed fur appeared in multiple iterations, like crop tops, thigh highs, plush coats, miniskirts, and platform Buffalo boots. These wares were inspired by “Monsters University mixed with Korean hookers and the way hip-hop singers dressed in the nineties, especially when they went to Aspen to ski,” said the duo. Hair and makeup was straight out of Spice World. The range had the energy of an early Jeremy Scott collection—you have to have a bit (make that a lot) of humorous attitude to rock these wares. Some slightly softer pieces, like horizontal-striped white and navy denim column dresses, rounded out the collection.

They say: “We wanted to channel sweatshirts and sweaters like they did in the nineties and just make them in fur. Like, what Lil Kim would wear to go skiing.”

Where to find it: Opening Ceremony.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

The Next Big Thing: Azede Jean-Pierre, Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

Azede Jean-Pierre

Label: Azede Jean-Pierre

Need to know: To the untrained eye, yesterday’s show had Azede Jean-Pierre trade in her usual nature-instilled offerings for a rolled-out-of-bed, sporty luxe. Not so, Jean-Pierre later explained. All it took was a higher perspective. Referencing an aerial view of the world, the collection bore the details of faraway landscapes in heavy, textural knits. Baubles looked like trees; ribbing resembled rivers; and a night sky, lit like an orange flame, came rendered in lustrous metallic separates.

For her third collection, Jean-Pierre upgraded from a presentation to full-fledged show. Janelle Monáe’s “What an Experience” appropriately kicked off the soundtrack. A slow, swaying collection of rounded, structural coats and slouchy pants paced down the runway. “Can you feel it?” crooned the singer in the background. A standout was an organza blouse worn under a wool sleeveless dress. If Jean-Pierre envisioned her woman donning beanie hats over flouncy dresses by day, then surely she could change into allover leather for night. Confidence, after all, is key to making the transition.

She says: “Initially, it was about wearability,” offered Jean-Pierre. “I wanted the clothes to be something I could throw on and wear all the time.”

Where to find it: Chalk boutique in Chicago, Moda Operandi, and www.azedejean-pierre.com for inquiries.