Style.com

August 20 2014

styledotcom Tom Hanks has an app? stylem.ag/1oOODte

Subscribe to Style Magazine
46 posts tagged "The Row"

Here’s What Our Editors Will Be Buying for Fall

-------

It may be warm here in New York today, but the Fall collections are already hitting stores and cooler weather is just around the corner. Our Fall Shopping Guide should help you ready your wardrobe for the autumn months, but for some further inspiration, have a look at our editors’ Fall picks, below.

Nicole Phelps

Nicole Phelps, Executive Editor

A good fashion week dress from Damir Doma and a good fashion week shoe from Saint Laurent, not necessarily to be worn together. And because I’m not quite ready to admit that the shows are five weeks away, a pair of rehabbed vintage Levi’s from the new denim brand Re/Dun to wear all August long.

Damir Doma dress, $780, Buy it now; Saint Laurent kitten heel, $595, Buy it now; Re/Dun straight skinnies, $232, for more information, visit redun.com.

Margiela

Katharine K. Zarrella, Associate News Editor

I have poor blood circulation and am thus constantly freezing. I can’t wear my vintage 1920s monkey-fur coat all the time (though I’d love to), so I’m planning to rely on this cropped goat-hair jacket from Maison Martin Margiela for some deeply chic everyday insolation.

Maison Martin Margiela goat-hair-trimmed wool-blend cropped jacket, $2,590, Buy it now

Sandro

Amber Kallor, Senior Beauty Editor

Should another Polar Vortex descend upon New York, I’ll be prepared with this oil-print anorak from Sandro. The sleek silhouette makes it easy to slip in and out of backstage, but the down filling provides plenty of warmth while I’m trekking from show to show.

Sandro oil-printed anorak, $775, Buy it now

Adam Lippes

Brittany Adams, Associate Fashion Editor

The bitter Polar Vortex we New Yorkers endured this past winter shook me to the core (I’m still in a state of disbelief walking around in bare legs this summer) and already has me preparing for the cold months ahead. If there’s one trend I’m eager to get my hands on next season, it’s a statement-making shearling. I’m currently pining over Adam Lippes‘ oh-so-cuddly navy belted topper. It’s the stylish equivalent of a bear hug and will be sure to earn me compliments while keeping out the chill.

Adam Lippes belted shearling coat, $3,290, Buy it now

Missoni

Rachel Walgrove, Social Media Editor

It’s time to upgrade the ponchos that are currently in my closet. In chenille, this Missoni knit basically doubles as a wearable blanket. Plus, it’s super-easy to throw on over just about anything.

Missoni chenille poncho, $250, Buy it now

APC

Noah Johnson, Deputy Editor

Louis Wong consistently makes impeccable leather jackets under his line for A.P.C., but this season’s Ferris jacket is the first one that I must own. Colored suede was among my favorite trends from the Spring ’15 men’s shows, but I’m impatient, so waiting until next season is out of the question.

A.P.C. Louis W. Ferris jacket, $1,395, Buy it now

Zana Bayne

Kristin Anderson, Assistant Editor of Special Projects

When fashion week hits, my current shoulder bag may not cut it. This stunning tote from Zana Bayne is big enough for a notebook, tape recorder, flats, and maybe even a pilfered Perrier (or two).

Zana Bayne pentagram handbag, $525, Buy it now

Gucci

Jessica Teves, Site Director

I’m a bit mad for cozy pastels, so this boxy Gucci peacoat is the perfect transitional piece for the cooler months—plus, it livens up my go-to uniform of skinny jeans and a white T-shirt.

Gucci wool double-breasted peacoat, $2,500. For more information, visit gucci.com.

Shrimps

Emily Farra, Editorial Coordinator

I love Shrimps’ irreverent approach to faux fur—there’s nothing stuffy or upper crust about it. This camel, blush, and orange coat features all of my favorite fall colors, plus it won’t break the bank like the real thing would. I’d much rather wear a faux color-blocked version than blend into the pack of women in the same chocolate-brown mink.

Shrimps faux-fur coat, $920, Buy it now

The Row

Erinn Hermsen, Assistant Managing Editor

Despite my Wisconsin roots, I’m a wimp when it comes to the cold. Sweaters are a key part of my daily uniform during the fall and winter months, and The Row‘s cozy cashmere version would be the perfect addition to my rotation.

The Row cashmere sweater, $4,550. For more information, visit saksfifthavenue.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photos 

Ali Hewson and Danielle Sherman Open Up About Edun’s Future

-------

Edun

Since launching Edun in 2005, Ali Hewson and husband Bono have been candid about the challenges they’ve faced in developing and maintaining a fashion brand—particularly one with an ambitious mandate to source materials and employ artisans across Africa. But then, when the name of your label is nude spelled backward, perhaps transparency is a given. While Edun has been partially owned by LVMH for the past five years, only recently, with the appointment of creative director Danielle Sherman in April 2013, has the brand come into its own. Shortly before guests arrived chez Bono for a three-part party hosted by MyTheresa.com to celebrate the company’s launch on the site, Sherman (formerly of Alexander Wang and The Row) and Hewson settled into an outdoor nook overlooking the Mediterranean to discuss the state of Edun today.

Danielle, you’ve just been made a member of the CFDA. What does that mean to you?
Danielle Sherman: I’m very lucky to be a part of that community now. It puts us on another platform. With Edun, so much of what we do is about a meeting of the minds. This is another way of connecting to a larger community.

Now that Danielle has two seasons behind her, how has the team settled into this new chapter at Edun?
Ali Hewson: I think Danielle has done an amazing job in rewriting us aesthetically and finding exactly how to work in Africa and how we produce. We’re now producing 85 percent in Africa, which was our goal from the beginning—we just could never really get there. But with Danielle’s commitment, we are there.

How did you finally reach this goal?
DS: It’s in the details. Everyone [in this industry] is creating and manufacturing stuff, but the details are what make things special. We do this by talking to the people who are making our clothing. But then also setting up a structure where they can understand our language—certain details like necklines—and then they can successfully achieve it. So it’s not like we just send packages away and then expect to get something back. The way we work at Edun and the factories we work with in Africa—it’s all extremely intimate.

Ali, how did you determine that Danielle would be a good fit?
AH: Bono and I met her in Switzerland at a hotel. We were on our way someplace; she came to see us, and we had an hour and a half together. But it was very clear to us just by meeting her that this was someone who was really going to think through every step of the process and who had the excitement and imagination to do the creative side. It kind of just oozes out of her; you can feel it. So we felt very confident once we met with Danielle—as if we found home.

How does access to artisanal techniques benefit the collections?
DS: Madagascar has a vast history of embroidery, for example. So if anything, it’s us going there and learning from them. That’s why we say it’s reciprocal—not purely a transfer of skills from our end or their end. When I visited last year, we were walking on a beach and saw some fishermen’s homes—essentially long leaves interwoven into honeycomb structures. It was so beautiful and so straightforward. Little things like that can inspire the total direction of a season.

Your most recent collection drew from your visit to the archives at the Musée de Quai Branly in Paris. But it hardly feels like a trip back in time. How do you keep the collections current?
DS: I think being a woman and being able to relate intimately to the clothing that you’re working with and that you’re wearing—you see something and you’re influenced by it. And then the way we like to interpret it is in a nuanced way, not an obvious way. When I went to the Musée du Quai Branly, I met with Héléne Joubert, who oversees the African textile archive, and the history is all there. The textiles that were really interesting to me were from North Africa, especially Morocco. They’re geometric and graphic and have a lot of stripes. That’s what gave me the idea to take something classic like a herringbone and intersect it with a stripe.

Danielle, you clearly have the basics figured out from your stints at Alexander Wang and The Row. Were the directional runway looks a challenge?
DS: I think in order to really push Edun and give it new direction creatively, we had to introduce more transformative or aspirational pieces. This took more time to develop because I needed to still relate to it in some capacity; it couldn’t be totally foreign. Nothing that we do is really fantastical or frivolous and there’s no excess. Everything is quite stripped down, very reduced to an essence. The stuff you see in the show is definitely stuff we have worked and reworked. But I read that Fitzgerald rewrote The Great Gatsby something like 76 times. And if he wrote that book 76 times, then I could redo this collection a few times. For Edun to be a viable and relevant brand, people need to relate and understand the core basics and classics, because that is the everyday. But people still need to get excited by something, and those pieces have to be what you see in the show.

With MyTheresa, are you after greater brand visibility and reach?
AH: Absolutely. And to introduce Danielle as the creative director of Edun internationally—to get people to understand and recognize who she is and what she does. MyTheresa really wants to support us. As Jens [Jens Riewenherm, MyTheresa's CEO] was saying to me earlier, “We’re not into a one-night stand; we’re into commitment.” Which is so important for us because we’re still a small brand working in Africa.

Have you been able to speak with clients and retailers about their opinions and expectations?
DS: That’s probably been one of the biggest challenges; we don’t have our own store, so we are relying on retailers to give us information. Justin [Justin O'Shea, MyTheresa's buying director] came in a few times and we’ve had conversations to understand his market and who his customer is, because it varies significantly from other dot-coms. And MyTheresa has such a unique angle. They’re the ones picking up those showpieces. I really like honesty. My mom and my sister talk about things a lot. Ali might say why she likes something or what she’s not into.

AH: Danielle is very open, which for a creative person, is amazing. She’s really open to what people think and what they want to wear and to making Edun a success. At the end of the day, you can have the most beautiful clothes, but if people don’t want to wear them, it’s not going to go anywhere. And the whole point of the mission is that we do sell clothes, and then the company grows and therefore we work more in Africa.

Do you find this is a motivator for you—that it gives the fashion another dimension?
DS: It’s unlike any experience I’ve had. I ask myself, How can I be tired when there’s a bigger hill to climb? It’s something that’s bigger than us. And that’s what this is about.

What will Edun look like in five years?
DS: I still think it will have its essence of purity, just by the way we tend to dress ourselves. It always feels honest and very real, and I hope it still has that. I think it will become more diverse, if anything. Our goal eventually is to enter into other categories, which will also fulfill the mission.

AH: It’s very exciting because you’re standing at the bottom of this thing and you don’t know quite how it’s going to grow. But you know it’s going to grow and it has huge potential and great energy moving forward, especially at the moment.

Is it important that Danielle shift the focus from a Bono/Ali story to Edun proper?
AH: We realized from the beginning that no matter what the mission, the aesthetic is the most important thing. Or else it’s not fashion and it’s not going to be a business. And it needs to be a business to achieve its mission. So the aesthetic is what makes it sustainable, and that’s where Danielle comes in.

Danielle, have Ali and Bono influenced the way you think about design?
DS: I have always loved to travel, but most of my research has been from books and things I get inspired by from my friends who are artists. Ali and Bono have shown me a whole other world that exists, and there’s so much incredible inspiration and so many people we have met and a culture I was more or less foreign to that I am starting to get to know. They also continue to encourage me to travel. Bono said to me, “You need to make time to dream.” What he meant is I really need to take that time to clear my head, and see something and have an experience—and then to bring it back to Edun and interpret it and translate it in some way that people can also experience.

UPDATED: Nadège Vanhee Rumored to Be Hermès’ Top Pick

-------

UPDATE: Multiple industry sources have now confirmed to Style.com that Nadège Vanhee will succeed Christophe Lemaire as the creative director of womenswear at Hermès. The house is believed to be sending out an official announcement tomorrow morning.

hermesLet the rumors begin! According to WWD, word on the street is that behind-the-scenes star Nadège Vanhee, who cut her teeth at Delvaux and Maison Martin Margiela, worked under Phoebe Philo as the design director at Céline, and is now the design director at The Row, is Hermès’ top pick to succeed Christophe Lemaire as the head of womenswear. It would be nice to see someone like Vanhee, who has a wealth of experience and an eye for clean, sophisticated luxury, get a mega-gig like the one at Hermès—goodness knows she’s paid her dues. An announcement may be made as early as this week.

When I first heard this rumor, it reminded me of Jil Sander’s choice to hire Rodolfo Paglialunga—a designer who, save a stint as the creative director at Vionnet, earned his stripes working behind the scenes at Prada for 10 years. And then there’s the case of Julie de Libran’s appointment at Sonia Rykiel. Another under-the-radar gem, de Libran designed the pre-collections for Louis Vuitton, but was, of course, not as well known as the brand’s creative director and face, Marc Jacobs. Sometimes it makes sense to have a big name head up a big house. But it’s nice to see that the work of talented, though less famous, industry vets does not go unnoticed.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/Indigitalimages.com

A Modest Proposal: Designers Take a Covered-Up Approach to Eveningwear

-------

EveningwearIn today’s social-media-fueled culture, modesty has become an overlooked virtue. While we admittedly got a thrill scrolling through endless Instagram posts exploring various angles of Rihanna’s butt crack following Monday night’s CFDA Awards, it takes a brave fashion icon like Rih to pull off a look leaving that little to the imagination. But for those women who still prefer to maintain an air of mystery, designers have us covered—literally. In recent months, we’ve noticed an upswing in full-on maxi dresses, which serve as evidence that high necklines and long sleeves can be sexy, too. Take, for example, Dolce & Gabbana’s billowing floral gowns for Fall (wind machine not included) or the body-veiling, mosaic-print numbers (complete with matching harem pants) featured on Chanel’s Cruise runway in Dubai last month. Adding fuel to the more-is-more eveningwear trend are the new Resort collections from Gucci’s Frida Giannini and Erdem Moralioglu, who presented curve-hugging column styles and floor-skimming guipure lace confections, respectively. For IRL proof that modesty and sensuality don’t have to be mutually exclusive, look no further than The Row’s Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen: The chic twins have been rocking maximum coverage ensembles for years.

Click for a slideshow of our favorite modest eveningwear looks.

And The CFDA Awards Go To…

-------

Joseph AltuzarraThree cheers for Joseph Altuzarra! The talent won Womenswear Designer of the Year, the top honor at the CFDA Awards, which just wrapped at Alice Tully Hall. Altuzarra, who secured an investment from Kering last year, had some stiff competition in fellow nominees Alexander Wang and Marc Jacobs, but we’d have to say the honor is much deserved. Public School’s Maxwell Osborne and Dao-Yi Chow won Menswear Designer of the Year, beating out Thom Browne and Rag & Bone’s Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, and The Row’s Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen took the Accessories Designer of the Year accolade, triumphing over Alexander Wang and Proenza Schouler’s Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough.

The third time was a charm for Creatures of the Wind’s Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters, who won the Swarovski Award for Womenswear after being nominated in 2012 and 2013—bravo, boys! And to round things out, Tim Coppens and Irene Neuwirth earned the Swarovski Award for Menswear and Accessories respectively. The big winners were in good company, and shared the stage with such honorees as Tom Ford, Raf Simons, and a crystal-clad Rihanna. As host John Waters put it, “Fashion is power.” Tonight’s celebrated designers and icons certainly have a lot of it. Congratulations to this year’s victors and honorees, all of whom are listed below. Don’t forget to check out our complete coverage of the CFDA Awards, here.

WOMENSWEAR DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
Joseph Altuzarra for Altuzarra

MENSWEAR DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
Maxwell Osborne and Dao-Yi Chow for Public School

ACCESSORIES DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
Mary-Kate Olsen and Ashley Olsen for The Row

SWAROVSKI AWARD FOR WOMENSWEAR
Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters for Creatures of the Wind

SWAROVSKI AWARD FOR MENSWEAR
Tim Coppens

SWAROVSKI AWARD FOR ACCESSORIES
Irene Neuwirth

GEOFFREY BEENE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Tom Ford

INTERNATIONAL AWARD
Raf Simons for Christian Dior

FASHION ICON OF THE YEAR AWARD
Rihanna

THE MEDIA AWARD IN HONOR OF EUGENIA SHEPPARD
Paul Cavaco

THE FOUNDER’S AWARD IN HONOR OF ELEANOR LAMBERT
Bethann Hardison

BOARD OF DIRECTORS’ TRIBUTE
Ruth Finley

Photo: Getty Images