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August 1 2014

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46 posts tagged "The Row"

Take Five: Tracy Sedino’s Warehouse of Vintage Sunglasses

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Fashion folk are a curious bunch, and we’ve found that they tend to collect equally curious things. In our “Take Five” feature, we get the lowdown on our favorite industry personalities’ most treasured trinkets.

Vintage Linda Farrow Glasses

There won’t be enough sun-filled English days in this lifetime for Tracy Sedino to wear each pair of vintage shades in the Linda Farrow archive. “Oh, my god, I must have thousands,” she said last week at a dinner in New York. Sedino was behind the revival of the Linda Farrow brand, whose namesake designer worked with houses such as Yves Saint Laurent and Emilio Pucci to create glasses in the seventies and eighties. Farrow closed her business to start a family in the late eighties, and her crates of luxurious lenses were stored away in a London warehouse.

Over a decade later, Sedino—then a student at the London College of Fashion—began dating (and has since married) Farrow’s son, Simon Jablon. “His father had some warehouses,” Sedino recalled. “And he asked Simon to get rid of all the stock, because they were getting turned into residential properties. So I went with him, and we found original Pucci and YSL sunglasses piled three-floors high.” Obviously, their discovery couldn’t go to waste, so she and Jablon used it as a jumping-off point and rebooted the house of Linda Farrow. They sold some of the vintage styles but, more notably, began partnering with young talents to turn out glamorous—and often outrageous—designs. (Remember those Jeremy Scott Minnie Mouse shades? That was their doing). Today, the husband-and-wife team continues the company in Farrow’s spirit and makes glasses for everyone from Dries Van Noten, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and Suno to Alexander Wang, Peter Pilotto, and The Row. “We thought there was a massive gap in the market,” said Sedino of her and Jablon’s decision to relaunch Linda Farrow. “You have these big luxury houses that sign licensing deals, but other designers, like Dries, will never do that, because they value their brands too much. We wanted to reinforce what Simon’s mother did in the seventies by working with designers to create eyewear as a fashion accessory, rather than a licensed product.”

Sedino and Jablon celebrated their company’s (and their relationship’s) tenth anniversary this year. And to mark the milestone, the duo have not only offered up a ten-year capsule collection but also opened a pop-up shop in collaboration with BOFFO, right here in NYC. The store, which is located at the Chelsea SuperPier, and open through December 24, boasts a bevy of Linda Farrow’s most covetable products. As for that archive of vintage sunnies, Sedino told us that it’s a constant point of reference. “We don’t want our collections to be too vintage, so we take inspiration from the vintage styles, and incorporate new technology and materials,” she said. Here, Sedino talks us through her five favorite pairs of old-school Linda Farrow frames.

1. “These are acetate Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties. They’re my holiday pair. I love them because the idea and design are fun, and they’re quite comfortable on my face. Ironically, it’s hard for me to find sunglasses that fit—for Asians, it’s difficult to find pairs that sit on the nose bridge. I’ve been wearing these for the last two years, and I’m particularly inspired their shape, because they’re almost like a big chunky Wayfarer. You can really wear them whenever.”

2. “These are Yves Saint Laurent glasses from the early seventies. They’re kind of a round Jackie O style. They’re handmade in acetate, with metal arms. This pair is a one-off, so we don’t have stock anymore. They’re one of my favorite styles, because they’re the perfect size. But I don’t really wear them, because I’m afraid of losing them.”

3. “These are Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties, and they were kind of inspired by Lolita. Whenever stylists call in for Lolita-style frames, we send them these. I wear them all the time in the summer.”

4. “These are amazing. This is another YSL pair from the seventies. They’re not one-of-a-kind—we still have a few—but not many. The lenses are polarized, and because of the orange, they’re my autumn glasses.”

5. “This is the most iconic Linda Farrow style. I love how the sides are beveled. We’ve actually launched a fine-jewelry collection of 18-karat-gold-and-diamond sunglasses, and this is one of the styles we used.”

Photo: John Munro

Beaufille Breaks Through

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Beaufille

Fashion currently boasts several talented sister acts (The Row, Rodarte, and Dannijo, for example), and Toronto-based Chloé and Parris Gordon are the latest sibling design duo making waves. After going by Chloé comme Parris for several seasons, the Gordons decided to relaunch their jewelry and ready-to-wear label as Beaufille, which means “handsome girl” in English. “We found ourselves in business pretty quickly after our graduate collection from design school (Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, in Halifax) was immediately picked up. Over the past few years, we’ve grown and changed—we got an outside investor and are looking at our business more internationally—so we wanted to take our names out of the brand and operate under an alias,” they told Style.com. “We’ve always designed for the effortlessly chic tomboy, and Beaufille combines the contrasting masculine/feminine, hard/soft elements that define our aesthetic.” The twosome divides the creative work evenly, with Chloé concentrating on clothing and Parris overseeing jewelry and accessories, and their standout items often combine both disciplines. The Spring ’14 lineup, which was reportedly inspired by the Renaissance and mob wives (specifically, Michelle Pfeiffer’s character in Scarface), featured silky tanks, skinny trousers, and inky brocade looks decorated with delicate chains, metal clasps, and other hardware details that tie in with the new range of semiprecious bijoux. Artist-slash-model Langley Fox (who turned up on the Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton runways this season) posed for the accompanying look book, which debuts here on Style.com. The Gordons said they “have admired Langley for a long time, mostly for her art, and loved collaborating with someone who shares an artistic point of view.”

Beaufille’s Spring collection ($165 to $1,200) will be sold online and in select boutiques, including Kin, in Los Angeles, and Belle & Sue, in Israel.

What About Mary-Kate?

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Ashley Olsen, Mary-Kate OlsenEarlier this month, the CFDA elected three new designers to sit on its board in order to replace former members Yeohlee Teng, Kenneth Cole, and Isabel Toledo, who will retain emeritus status. WWD reports today that the newcomers are Prabal Gurung, Deborah Lloyd, and The Row’s Ashley Olsen. Strangely, there was no mention of Ashley’s twin and co-designer, Mary-Kate. That’s not to say that the former Full House stars are required to do everything in tandem, but still…maybe next year?

Photo:Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

Linda Farrow Fetes the Big 1-0

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Linda Farrow

By now, the Linda Farrow story is one of lore. Ten years ago, Tracy Sedino and her boyfriend, Simon Jablon (Linda Farrow’s table tennis-champ son), were redecorating an old warehouse that belonged to his designer mom. And by pure fortune, they discovered a box filled with old sunglasses that Linda had created for Balenciaga, Dior, and YSL in the seventies. The rest is history.

Ten years on and happily married to Jablon, Sedino has been busy fulfilling her mother-in-law’s design dream that was put aside for love, marriage, and children. In the past decade, with Jablon quarterbacking the business angle, Sedino has developed the Linda Farrow brand to an extreme: Their stand-alone products have drawn a legion of fans (think Rihanna, Gaga, Queen Bey, Madonna), and their collaborations have raised the bar even higher. Jeremy Scott, Erdem, Dries Van Noten, Oscar de la Renta, The Row, and Matthew Williamson are just a few designers with whom the brand has worked hand in hand.

To fete their ten-year diamond anniversary, Sedino is taking the brand and its muse—a giant doe-eyed raven-haired doll called Penelope—on a whirlwind road show. First stop was Colette, where Penelope wore Sedino’s Alexander McQueen wedding dress, and now, to Selfridges, where the brand has a “shop-in-shop”—the new parlance for pop-up shop. Sedino and Jablon have called upon ten brands, including Nicholas Kirkwood, Mawi, Falke, and Agent Provocateur to come up with a limited-edition selection of goodies (which will be available until October) to celebrate. And these products are not your typical eyewear. A gold detailed heel from Nicholas Kirkwood, some very naughty bow-detailed pantyhose from Falke, a super-sexy aromatic candle from Cire Trudon, and a Lycra playsuit-cum-harness from Agent Provocateur (which reminds us of something out of Fifty Shades) gives us a clue as to what is on the couple’s minds as they commemorate ten years of marriage and business. A clutch from Bottega Veneta PT 1 and a fur from Saga give the collection just enough grown-up veneer to sugarcoat the boudoir naughtiness. Good to know the flame hasn’t gone out—all ten-year anniversaries should be like this one.

Photos: Courtesy of Linda Farrow

Full Closet: Mary-Kate and Ashley’s Quadruplets

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Mary-Kate and Ashley for Bik Bok

Design duo Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen added a fourth clothing collection this week, launching a line for Norwegian retailer Bik Bok to join The Row, Elizabeth and James, and Olsenboye. The grungy range is geared toward the “Scandinavian It Girl,” and its similarities to Fall ’13 Saint Laurent—lookbook model Julia Nobis included—have us doing a double take.

Photo: via www.bikbok.com