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July 22 2014

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27 posts tagged "Tomas Maier"

A Frill a Minute

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Isabel Marant's Dramatic RufflesForget your average everyday ruffles. The flounces that count for Spring are exaggerated and bold. Bottega Veneta’s Tomas Maier sculpted mille-feuille shapes on day dresses from a cotton woven with copper so that the fabric held its exuberant form. Dries Van Noten covered several of his finale numbers with clusters of voluminous, unfurling rosettes. Isabel Marant showed a one-shoulder frock featuring endless tiers of rippling tulle, and Mary Katrantzou whipped up printed baby-dolls decorated with both real and (for good measure) trompe l’oeil frills.

Here, a slide show of Spring’s most dramatic ruffled looks.

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Portrait Perfect: David Armstrong Lenses Bottega Veneta’s Resort ’14

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Bottega Veneta

Having previously collaborated with Ralph Gibson, Collier Schorr, and Tina Barney, it’s no surprise that Bottega Veneta designer Tomas Maier has tapped another famed portrait photographer, David Armstrong, to shoot both the men’s and women’s Resort ’14 ad campaigns. Featuring Laura Love and Lucas Mascarini, Armstrong’s naturally lit photos highlight the collections’ ease, craftsmanship, and relaxed elegance. Take a first look at the snaps here, exclusively on Style.com.

Photos: David Armstrong, Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

Pleats and Thank You

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Pleats from Bottega Veneta, Delpozo, and Dries van Noten

Pleating, in various iterations, unfurled as a keynote trend this season. Alexander Wang, for example, offered boxy swatches on miniskirts in New York. Also crimped in Manhattan: Victoria Beckham‘s peekaboo accordion creases. And, in Paris, Phoebe Philo caused a stir with loads of narrow corrugations at Céline. Yet where these designers skewed toward traditional folding, a trio of labels proposed a fancier twist on the technique for Spring ’14 via intricate pleats that mimicked ruffles.

At Delpozo, creative director Josep Font’s barley-yellow trousers, which boasted an arc of frilled pin-tucks, were a standout in his soft, painterly collection. In Paris, Dries Van Noten opened his show with a quiet white frock, the seams of which were embellished with whorls of gilded fabric. Bottega Veneta’s Tomas Maier, too, employed creased ruffles in his Spring ’14 lineup. One dress in particular—a gray-green number vertically veined in bow-like folds—was particularly striking. “I wanted to add texture and dimension in an unusual way,” Maier told Style.com. “The monochrome color, combined with the movement of the pleats, creates this effect.” To construct the garment, Maier and his team blended cotton with a vegetable fiber called ramie, which possesses malleable characteristics akin to copper. The result was a tactile sartorial sculpture.

Photos: IndigitalImages.com

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Talks Image-Making in the Digital Age

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Matin Zad

Stylist Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele knows a thing or two about fashion imagery. You know all those photographs from the late eighties and nineties of supermodels like Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Claudia Schiffer decked out in Versace, Chanel, and piles upon piles of gilded baubles? Well, we have her to thank for those.

De Dudzeele’s reputation for creating vivacious, lasting images is undoubtedly one of the reasons Bottega Veneta tapped her to sit on the judging panel of its 2013 New Exposure Photography Competition (she’s joined by heavy hitters such as Craig McDean, Guido Palau, Andrew Bolton, and Bottega’s own Tomas Maier). Launched last year in an effort to discover and support emerging talents, the competition features five standout finalists this year. And tonight, at New York’s Openhouse Gallery, Collin Kelly, Emma Powell, Masha Sardari, Matin Zad, or Shae DeTar will be announced as the 2013 victor. The finalists’ photographs debut here. And below, in between shoots and shows, de Dudzeele weighs in on photography in the digital age, discusses the overuse of Photoshop, and offers aspiring image-makers some invaluable advice.

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How has the process of image-making changed throughout the course of your career? And what’s remained the same?

Good ones are good ones! The talented people will still stay the same—they have it in their [guts]. What’s changed is that the focus on set has gone from looking at the subject…to looking at a monitor. Nowadays, people sometimes forget to have fun and to have their own point of view. Fashion photography still has, and needs a lot of, original ideas. The digital is just a tool.

What qualities do you feel make a successful image in this digital age?

Energy, capturing a moment, composition, authenticity, creativity!

What traits did you look for while judging the Bottega competition?

I was looking for a personal eye, a unique image, a sensitivity, and honesty… not a reproduction of something done before.

Is there anything you miss about a more classic approach to photography? And, conversely, is there anything you really love about images?

I miss the happy surprise! I miss the focus on the subject and the attention to details. It used to be that nothing could get “removed” or fixed afterwards. When you had it, you knew it. Digital is good to build a story, as you can work on layout and cropping, then. Technology can help a bad photographer get better, but ultimately, good photography does not need to be reworked.

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Is Photoshop used too much today? When do you feel it’s appropriate?

Yes! Moving around the filter and switching heads, hands, arms, everything, this is not the essence of a unique photograph. This is not real talent. Photoshopping is appropriate to enhance a beauty that’s already there—to help the dream come true.

Have your aesthetic values changed since the digital embrace?
My aesthetic has not changed. I love the girls, the fashion, the joy, the energy, and the ideas. Creating fun, iconic images still is the goal.

What advice would you give to emerging image-makers, whether they’re stylists or photographers, today?
Be you! Don’t over-reference. And love it! Sometimes, what people think is bad…is good.

Is there anything you’d like to add?
It’s only fashion!

Photos: Matin Zad, Emma Powell, Collin Kelly, Shat DeTar, Masha Sardari

How Much Is That Sculpture in the Window?

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Bottega Window

Long a champion of fusing art and fashion, Bottega Veneta unveiled a new—and bold-faced—cross-industry display at its Fifth Avenue flagship today: a window installation featuring a trio of the house’s Fall ’13 looks alongside two select works by the late artist John Chamberlain.

On loan from Gagosian Gallery (a first-of-its-kind endeavor for the famed dealer Larry Gagosian), Chamberlain’s EMPIREMICROPHONE and COLONELGARGLE—a set of crushed, chrome-plated sculptures—flank three of designer Tomas Maier’s richly hued Fall ’13 frocks. Both Chamberlain and Maier drew upon assemblage—the mid-century style in which artists retaliated against abstract minimalism by focusing more on materiality and physicality (for example, Chamberlain is most often recognized for his works containing parts of junked automobiles)—when creating their displayed works.

Maier, though, also specifically referenced an offshoot of this moment, dubbed Arte Povera, in which a dozen or so Italian artists worked with preindustrial and decidedly more sustainable components such as rocks, paper, and rope. The effect—especially on these dresses, which feature regenerated and punched-through silk-wool blends in eye-popping autumnal palettes—gives the term mash-up a whole new meaning.

The windows will be on display at Bottega Veneta’s 699 Fifth Avenue store through September 17.

Photo: Courtesy of Bottega Veneta