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April 18 2014

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9 posts tagged "Trussardi 1911"

Designer Firings: A Silver Lining?

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There’s another seat open at the designer fashion table. News broke today that Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi (above), creative directors of Gianfranco Ferré, are out at the Italian house (no word on their namesake collection, which presumably will continue for the present). Reports blame dwindling sales for the duo’s departure. But they’re only the latest in a string of designers who have left or been ousted from their positions at major European labels: Milan Vukmirovic at Trussardi 1911; Clare Waight Keller at Pringle of Scotland; Vanessa Seward at Azzaro. (Christophe Decarnin is out at Balmain, though under murkier circumstances; and of course, John Galliano has been let go from both Christian Dior and his namesake label. Although Chloé’s Hannah MacGibbon has been signed for another season, some industry observers are speculating that her time at the label is nearing a close—a speculation not necessarily refuted by the terse statements label CEO Geoffroy de la Bourdonnaye has been giving the press.)

No one would argue that getting fired is fun. But it’s worth remembering that, in fashion at least, many of those who have been removed from their posts—either gently (with contracts not renewed) or not so gently—have gone on to bigger and better. The classic example is Yves Saint Laurent. The young designer took the top spot at Christian Dior when Dior himself died suddenly in 1957. Saint Laurent created a few headline-making shows, but soon after ran afoul of the management and was summarily dismissed. The result? His own label, founded in 1961. The rest, as they say, is history.

In more recent years, there’s the famous story of Marc Jacobs, fired from Perry Ellis after his seminal Spring ’93 grunge collection—too hot for the American label’s taste, but seen in retrospect as enduringly influential. (Patrick Robinson also got the axe at Perry Ellis before landing at another American sportswear legend: The Gap.) Both Peter Dundas and Giambattista Valli exited the house of Ungaro under dark clouds; today, their collections (for Emilio Pucci and for Valli’s namesake line) are among the most admired in fashion. Olivier Theyskens has gone from Rochas to Nina Ricci to current acclaim at Theory, and Alessandra Facchinetti, formerly of Gucci and Valentino, has found new life working on Tom Ford’s womenswear. As for Ford, he has seen both sides: famously losing his Gucci crown before starting his own empire, while also electing not to retain Alber Elbaz at YSL in the late nineties. “From every place or everything you do, you learn what to do and also you learn what not to do,” Elbaz told Style.com of the experience in an interview last year. “I would not change anything if you would ask me. I would still go through the experience I went through. I learned a lot from it. I went through a certain experience that wasn’t easy, but guess what? Nothing is easy anyway, so I’m fine with that.” As the creative director of Lanvin, Elbaz has brought the label back to relevance and racked up success after success; it may not be easy, but he sure makes it look that way.

What will the future hold for Aquilano and Rimondi, Decarnin, or even Galliano (whose own rather more complicated situation is discussed at length in WWD today)? Too soon to tell. Some will argue that in today’s economic climate opportunities will be fewer and corporate titans more inclined to pick low key, perhaps unknown designers. But to judge from the past, fashion is a merry go-round (or should that be rollercoaster?), and for some of these designers at least, it’s entirely possible that the best is yet to come.

Photo: Marcus Tondo / GoRunway.com

Milan Vukmirovic Is Out At Trussardi 1911

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The fashion-world game of musical chairs continues apace: This morning, Trussardi 1911 announced that it is ending its affiliation with creative director Milan Vukmirovic (left, with Beatrice Trussardi). (The end of the partnership is being described as being “through mutual consent.”) Vukmirovic, who got his start in retail as one of the co-founders of Colette and of Miami’s The Webster (which he co-owns), designed the men’s and women’s collections for the past three years. This past January, he presented his Fall 2011 men’s collection at Pitti Uomo in Florence, where the Milanese label also celebrated its centennial with exhibitions dedicated to its history and its art collection.

Photo: Filippo Fior / GoRunway.com

Live From Florence: Trussardi 1911

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Now streaming, live from Pitti Uomo in Florence: Trussardi 1911‘s Fall 2011 menswear show. Check it out at 1 p.m. EST.

The Evening Jumpsuit: Hot Or Not?

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For Spring, the question on designers’ minds was: What would Yves Saint Laurent do? Everyone from Marc Jacobs to Gucci‘s Frida Giannini took pages straight from the late great’s playbook, showing seventies-inspired designs. There was no lack of jumpsuits on the runways, but in contrast to recent seasons, these were more Studio 54 dance floor than airplane hangar or mechanics’ garage.

Trussardi 1911‘s Milan Vukmirovic told Style.com, “The jumpsuit is great for evening because it’s a cool, all-in-one version of the tuxedo. It makes women look sexy.” At Hakaan and The Row, plunging necklines added an extra dose of glamour. If you’re going for something a little less racy, follow the lead of Celine‘s Phoebe Philo, who tossed a blazer over her strapless jumpsuit to accept her Designer of the Year prize at the British Fashion Awards.

Click for a slideshow and tell us if you’re going to get a jump on the Spring trend this New Year’s Eve.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos / GoRunway.com

The Pitti Preview

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Raffaello Napoleone, Pitti Immagine’s dapper CEO, convened a group of editors and trade officials—many chattering away in Italian—at Quattro in New York City for a briefing on the upcoming Pitti Uomo and Pitti W fairs. It was a whirlwind visit (Napoleone and company headed for the airport while most were still sipping espresso), but the news was all good. As has been announced, Gareth Pugh (left) will be the invited guest, presenting his new womenswear collection in Florence in January. (Via video message, he expressed his gratitude; Pitti’s special events director hinted that he’d be showing in an unlikely location—one that had never hosted a fashion show before.) Trussardi will be the invited guest for men’s, but the company has plans that go far beyond fashion. In the Stazione Leopalda in the heart of Florence, the label will not only host its fashion show, but also present an exhibition called 8 ½, one that will include contemporary artworks by Maurizio Catellan, Paul McCarthy, and Tino Sehgal. (There’ll even be a house made of bread, courtesy of Swiss conceptual artist Urs Fischer.) And Alberta Ferretti will kick off the event with a special collection presented, she said, “for women everywhere.”

The Florentine trade fair, which runs from January 11 to 14, will also play host to a variety of intriguing launches: a new archival project London-based designer Aitor Throup is undertaking with Umbro; a capsule collection celebrating the centennial of the Italian suit line Lubiam; and a new project from Adam Kimmel, who took his turn as Pitti’s invited menswear guest two years ago.

Photo: Courtesy of Pitti Immagine