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3 posts tagged "Umbro"

At Pitti, Collaborations From Kimmel And Throup

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Among the 1,000-plus exhibitors at the 79th edition of Pitti, which opened in Florence on Tuesday, were Adam Kimmel and Aitor Throup, two longtime Style.com favorites, both launching new collaborations with iconic heritage brands and both coming up trumps by creating gotta-have-it hybrids between past and future that will make next fall a better place to be.

Kimmel worked with Carhartt. (A first look from that collection is above.) In his case, that was a whole lotta history. The family-owned company has been dressing America’s working stiffs since 1889, which is the kind of durable blue-collar kudos that has ensured Carhartt’s coolness with skaters and snowboarders. In other words, Kimmel’s heroes when he was a kid. He himself got his first piece of Carhartt outerwear—synthetic duck, quilt lining, corduroy collar (they still make it)—when he was 10. His own take on the brand is, in fact, less a collaboration than a 29-piece Kimmel collection manufactured by Carhartt, so he is able, as he says, “to offer a product at an incredible price point” to an audience that may have craved his Italy-produced signature line without having the readies to buy it. That said, the Kimmel-Carhartt connection is umbilical. The designer has always been acutely sensitive to function in his clothes, and his silhouette has always been forgiving—he used to call it “an American cut,” as opposed to Euro skinny-minnie. Still, he’s trimmed some of the Carhartt bulk. The stiffness is gone, too. In fact, to wear these clothes is to love them. A worker’s jacket in an almost luminous indigo moleskin was softer than velvet. A substantial parka/jean jacket hybrid (2-in-1 pieces are a Kimmel signature) was much lighter on the body than on the hanger. Such user-friendliness will win hearts, minds, and dollars when Kimmel/Carhartt shows up at Barneys later in the year. (Barneys’ Jay Bell brokered the relationship, so the store has an exclusive.)


Barneys is also where you’ll find Aitor Throup’s latest collaboration with sportswear giant Umbro (above). Last year, he remodeled the English football team’s uniform for its ill-fated World Cup appearance in South Africa. Now, he’s revisiting ten iconic pieces from Umbro’s archives (for example, the jacket worn by manager Alf Ramsay in 1966, the year England won the Cup). Throup is obsessive in his research. There’s at least two years’ worth in this new venture (it’s actually called Archive Research Project), and there aren’t many designers who could match Throup’s understanding of the way an athlete’s body moves in clothing. He refers to it as “data informing design,” which, techspeak aside, produces garments that follow and flatter the human form as elegantly and effectively as the finest bespoke tailoring. Throup is quick to point out that when Umbro launched in 1924, footballers’ uniforms were tailor-made. In restoring the essence of that tradition, he’s guaranteeing that sportswear will never be the same.

Photos: Courtesy of Adam Kimmel; Courtesy of Umbro

The Pitti Preview

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Raffaello Napoleone, Pitti Immagine’s dapper CEO, convened a group of editors and trade officials—many chattering away in Italian—at Quattro in New York City for a briefing on the upcoming Pitti Uomo and Pitti W fairs. It was a whirlwind visit (Napoleone and company headed for the airport while most were still sipping espresso), but the news was all good. As has been announced, Gareth Pugh (left) will be the invited guest, presenting his new womenswear collection in Florence in January. (Via video message, he expressed his gratitude; Pitti’s special events director hinted that he’d be showing in an unlikely location—one that had never hosted a fashion show before.) Trussardi will be the invited guest for men’s, but the company has plans that go far beyond fashion. In the Stazione Leopalda in the heart of Florence, the label will not only host its fashion show, but also present an exhibition called 8 ½, one that will include contemporary artworks by Maurizio Catellan, Paul McCarthy, and Tino Sehgal. (There’ll even be a house made of bread, courtesy of Swiss conceptual artist Urs Fischer.) And Alberta Ferretti will kick off the event with a special collection presented, she said, “for women everywhere.”

The Florentine trade fair, which runs from January 11 to 14, will also play host to a variety of intriguing launches: a new archival project London-based designer Aitor Throup is undertaking with Umbro; a capsule collection celebrating the centennial of the Italian suit line Lubiam; and a new project from Adam Kimmel, who took his turn as Pitti’s invited menswear guest two years ago.

Photo: Courtesy of Pitti Immagine

The Second-Biggest News In English Football (After That Whole Sex Scandal), And More From Aitor Throup

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With England in the grip of a Tiger-sized sports scandal—one involving John Terry, captain of the national football team, and his best friend and teammate’s girlfriend, who he apparently got pregnant (bad move for 2009′s Dad of the Year)—last night’s launch of the kit the team will wear for their World Cup bid in South Africa this year was a surprisingly low-key affair. Mind you, there were no actual footballers present, just a small group of sponsors, reps from Umbro, and the uni’s designer, Aitor Throup. He’s been busy. The Best-Looking Designer in Fashion™ is moving out of his years-long best-kept-secret phase with the launch next fall of a capsule collection of trousers, to be followed by a full collection the following season. Throup debuted the pants during the men’s shows in Paris with an elaborate, eerie installation (pictured) that highlighted the complex conceptual thought that goes into everything he does. Concepts aside, his designs offer a genuine re-evaluation of basic items, subtly with the footballers’ gear, more overtly with his own line, which promises to make you look and feel quite different in your clothes. And if that sounds mysterious, that’s because Aitor is also the Most Enigmatic Designer in Fashion™.

Photo: Courtesy of Aitor Throup