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April 16 2014

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25 posts tagged "Vanessa Traina"

Her Family Is Famous For Diamonds, But Gaia Repossi Is More Inspired By A Feather Through The Nose

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In recent years, the jewelry house of Repossi—founded in 1925 and nearing its 90th birthday—has won over a whole new generation of fans. Credit goes to Gaia Repossi, the 26-year-old artistic director, who took over her father’s post in 2007 and quickly introduced her own style as well as collaborations with friends like Joseph Altuzarra and Alexander Wang. (Her pieces made Style.com’s Top 10 Jewels list for Spring and Fall 2012.) All this despite protests that she’d never enter the family trade. “I was very intellectual, in my little own world,” Repossi said on a recent visit to New York to toast her ongoing partnership with Barneys. “I rejected completely the jewelry world.” But after studying painting, anthropology, and archaeology, Repossi edged into the business by the side door, as it were—she initially wanted to focus on its image and marketing—and wound up giving it a timely overhaul. “I wanted to bring it closer to what jewelry is nowadays to me,” she says, “and maybe also what jewelry was missing.” She spoke to Style.com about her work, her studies, and her art. For the record, she still paints.

Tell me a little bit about your background, and how you came to work for the family business.
It’s a little bit unexpected, even if it seems expected. When you grow up you can have two reactions: You can be very keen on what your parents are doing, or you want to look for something else. I was absolutely not willing to continue to work as my dad did [at Repossi]; I strictly wanted to do something different. I was painting as a teenager and I was aiming to really focus on that as my career. I started studying painting and I finished doing archeology, because I wanted to go more in the past, in the civilizations and the history of art. In the meantime, while I was in Paris studying, I saw a few things I didn’t like in my dad’s image of the company that I wanted to touch. Slowly it came out, the idea to launch a collection. And it worked, without even thinking about it. Unconsciously all my studies and my own imaginary world started applying to jewelry.

For example…?
It’s like, you go to India and see the nomads with garlands of silver things that they consider cheap, but they are extremely elegant. Nowadays, women don’t know how to wear the jewelry anymore, but when you go in India, there’s people barefoot but they are extremely elegant with all their jewelry. There are some codes, there’s an aesthetic that inspires me and has me working, a lot more than this [European] lady with her beautiful diamonds, even if she is elegant. It’s more that those silhouettes are striking. In Africa too—in Congo with their combs, and in Amazonia with their feathers in their nose.

Your anthropology courses proved to be good training.
Exactly. I was studying anthropology—ethnic similarities in between the civilizations. Even in those classes, jewelry became very important. Sculpture, too. When I go to shows, they have patterns, it’s the same. [But you also need] the family and the background that knows how it do it in a very refined way, because there’s no point to making a sculpture [for jewelry]—it has to be wearable and refined, not a heavy object you don’t know what to do with. Continue Reading “Her Family Is Famous For Diamonds, But Gaia Repossi Is More Inspired By A Feather Through The Nose” »

Borgo Magic

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In keeping with the tradition of using his famous stylish fans as his models (Vanessa Traina, Lauren Santo Domingo, and Kate Lanphear, to name a few), Eddie Borgo brought on V‘s Cecilia Dean to star in his latest ad campaign. “Cecilia was a natural progression for us; she exemplifies all those mysterious, sexy elements of a woman with effortless style,” Borgo tells Style.com. “I was so nervous, at first, to ask for her participation, but so thrilled when she accepted at a friend’s dinner party in Paris.” The collection was inspired by magic and the occult, referencing the work of British occultist Austin Osman Spare and Robert Mapplethorpe’s projects outside of photography. “The connection between the two artists was their ability to create imagery that was simultaneously strong as it was elegant and refined,” explains Borgo. His translation of the two artists’ work came in the form of geometric shapes, like stars and pentagrams, which he then covered in white powder “to evoke the feeling of lace.”

For the shoot, he enlisted his go-to team: stylist Keegan Singh and photographer Paul Maffi. Here, catch Dean in action in this Style.com exclusive video along with a shot from the campaign.

Photo: Paul Maffi

Rx Chanel

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At last, a coloring book for all ages. The RxArt coloring book was technically created for kids—it’s handed out to children in the hospital as way to take their mind off their illnesses, but the Chanel Beauté-sponsored booklet will make just about anyone want to get their crayon box out. Between the Lines features designs by more than 40 artists, including Hope Atherton, Mr. Brainwash, Deborah Kass, Jose Parla, and cover art by Rob Pruitt. (Pruitt also made the sparkly panda bear stickers that come in the centerfold—Lisa Frank, watch out.)

On Thursday, the third volume of the coloring book project will be officially unveiled at the 2011 Rx Party (also sponsored by Chanel Beauté) at the Highline Stages, hosted by Jen Brill, Leigh Lezark, Vanessa Traina, Poppy Delevingne, and Caroline Sieber. Works of art, including pieces from Yoko Ono, James Franco, Nate Lowman, and Terry Richardson, will be on auction at the event—no Crayolas required here.

To buy tickets to the event, visit www.rxart.com.

Photo: Rob Pruitt / Between The Lines Volume 3

Behind The Scenes At Joseph Altuzarra’s First-Ever Lookbook Shoot

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It’s a growth market for Joseph Altuzarra. The New York designer presents his first Resort collection today (created, in part, to meet the increasing demand from retailers), and with it, his label’s first branded materials. Last week, Altuzarra convened a team that included photographer Steven Pan (a former assistant of Steven Meisel’s), models Danielle Zinaich and Aurélie Claudel, and his longtime friend, stylist Vanessa Traina, at Milk Studios to shoot the new lookbook. (It’ll debut on Style.com, along with our collection review, later today.)

“Generally, the inspiration was very nineties,” Altuzarra said. (Sure enough, the inspiration board was a collage of nineties-era ads and looks from Jil Sander and Gucci.) “I was a little tired of things that were so self-consciously fashion-y. I wanted something that was a lot more natural.” That extended as well to the casting of Zinaich and Claudel, two industry veterans (and, as it happens, old friends) who are less flavors of the moment, more lifers.

“I was really interested in working with women,” he continued. Danielle and Aurélie “both have kids, they’re both married, and they’re in their thirties. I think it’s more what Altuzarra is about—it’s about women, and not so much 16-year-old girls. [Altuzarra is about] a real personality. The fact that there was a connection between them and they were really friendly, I think that that was something that was really interesting.”

The collection itself Altuzarra describes as “a segue between the Fall show and the Spring show.” That means a chance to reprise a few recent greatest hits. Good news for those coveting the parkas that were a major statement for Fall: They’ll return, reworked, in lighter-weight cotton.

Photos: Alex John Beck for Altuzarra

Embracing The Artisanal At Chanel’s Tribeca Dinner

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There was plenty of Chanel on hand at last night’s Tribeca Film Festival dinner, sponsored by Lagerfeld’s label. But among the star-studded guests, we couldn’t take our eyes off of Vanessa Traina, wearing Spring ’11 Celine. The newly minted designer/muse (of French label Maje) arrived on the arm of her mother, Danielle Steel, wearing a full runway look. The woven vest, which Nicole Phelps picked out as one of the strongest pieces in the entire Spring collection, and Phoebe Philo’s commitment to artisanal work, isn’t cheap, but neither is looking good—if you want to look good in silks hand-woven by an elderly Frenchwoman. And if Traina gets bored of the vest and wants to trade, she’s only got to call up Kanye.

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com