Style.com

August 23 2014

styledotcom Three questions for a powerhouse player in Brazil's fashion scene: stylem.ag/XEntdC pic.twitter.com/j36jpxEAvF

Subscribe to Style Magazine
123 posts tagged "Versace"

Runway to Red Carpet: Hollywood Goes to Washington and a Pair of Sinister Heels

-------

Elle fanningAlthough many A-listers spent the week partying it up New York style while in town for Monday night’s Met gala, it was still work as usual for some. The cast of Maleficent began their press tour overseas, kicking things off with a photo call in Paris on Monday. Elle Fanning stepped out in a moss-green Valentino Pre-Fall ’14 frock, appropriately paired with Charlotte Olympia’s Sleeping Beauty pumps adorned with the sinister villain’s face. On Thursday, things moved to London for a private reception at Kensington Palace. Leading lady Angelina Jolie turned up in a plunging crystal-covered Atelier Versace gown in her signature color, black.

Stateside, Elizabeth Olsen kicked off the premiere tour for Godzilla on Thursday, donning a black Chloé Fall ’14 gown for the Hollywood premiere. Earlier in the week, Marion Cotillard took to the red carpet in a Mary Katrantzou Fall ’14 frock patchworked with signs and symbols at the premiere of The Immigrant in New York.

On Saturday, a bevy of Hollywood notables flocked to Washington, D.C., for the 100th Annual White House Correspondents’ Association dinner, donning designer duds for a turn on the red carpet. Lupita Nyong’o was (obviously) among the best dressed, stepping out in a black Oscar de la Renta Fall ’14 gown with a white polka-dot peplum top.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: Pascal Le Segretain / WireImage

Fit to Be Tied: Lace-Up Details on the Fall Runways

-------

Now TrendingOversize, architectural shapes have earned quite a bit of attention in recent seasons, but at times it can seem as though designers are trying to mask or resist the female figure rather than embrace it. And so, it was refreshing to witness a return to sensuality on the Fall runways in the form of curve-enhancing, corset-inspired details. Raf Simons led the charge at Dior, sending out tailored sheaths featuring decorative lacing—apparently a nod to the laces of trainers—that traced along the torso and hips. Tough grommets whipstitched in leather turned up on the Balenciaga, Emilio Pucci, and Hood by Air runways, while Dolce & Gabbana took the trend in a more overtly sexy direction with fluttery chiffon dresses boasting built-in bustiers. Its tightly cinched numbers might require a fainting couch. Similarly, there was a slight fetishistic undercurrent about the tall lace-up boots that accessorized key looks at Antonio Berardi and Versace.

Here, a slideshow of Fall’s toothsome lace-up details.

Fashion Over Function: Why Wearable Tech Is the Worst

-------

Google GlassNews broke yesterday morning that Google has enlisted Luxottica—the company that crafts eyewear for such brands as Prada, Ray-Ban, Chanel, Versace, and beyond—to make Google Glass less hideous. That’s all good and fine—at least the Internet giant is placing an appropriate amount of importance on aesthetics. But I have to be honest: I am deeply tired of hearing about, writing about, and thinking about wearable tech. I have no desire to be hooked up to a device all day. The nonstop e-mail-induced vibrating of my iPhone already gives me heart palpitations, and I don’t need my rings, bracelets, and specs incessantly nagging me, too.

Considering Apple’s recent hires—Saint Laurent’s former CEO of special projects Paul Deneve and Burberry’s former CEO Angela Ahrendts—and Humberto Leon and Carol Lim’s partnership with Intel, wearable tech is no doubt about to explode. And it has the potential to generate big business among Millennials who are lost without their tablets, smartphones, and various other gadgets. I’m just not interested in participating in this particular big bang.

That’s not to say that wearable tech isn’t impressive from, well, you know, a tech standpoint. I find it mind-boggling that a Nike Fuel Band has the capacity to track your steps and calories burned, and then spit that information out into the World Wide Web. However, I’m unsure why the world (or the NSA, for that matter) needs to know your, or my, workout routine. Nor do I enjoy being bombarded on Facebook by everyone’s “humble brags” about how many miles they ran today. I’ve unfriended people for less. But I digress.

As someone who has dedicated my life to fashion, I refuse to compromise on the appearance of a garment or accessory. I’d much prefer to spend my wages on a decadent pair of low-tech vintage sunnies than on a mediocre style with Wi-Fi.

Furthermore, when is enough tech enough? Despite the fact that it doubles as my career, fashion is my escape—and I think a lot of people feel that way. When I slip on a new dress or place my favorite hat upon my head, I get butterflies in my stomach. All my troubles dissolve (if only for an instant), and it’s as though I’ve been transported to my own personal sartorial oasis. Why on earth would I trade in those moments of bliss for a flashing frock with 4G capabilities?

And what’s so great about being connected all the time, anyway? Forever burned in my mind is an election party I attended in 2012. The invitees were educated, opinionated, entertaining, and dynamic, but for a good portion of the evening, I had to check their Twitter feeds in order to get their thoughts on the polls. What could have been a riveting few hours of discussion was diminished to a silent, nonstop tweet-fest. While I sat there with my iPhone tucked in my handbag (my mother always told me that it was rude to stare at one’s phone in social situations because it makes your company feel as though they’re not important), mumbling to myself, all I could think was, What a waste. Can you imagine how much worse this will become if we’re not required to take the extra step of reaching into our pockets to tweet, Instagram, e-mail, Facebook, etc.? If the Internet is latched onto our wrists or eyes, will we even speak to each other anymore?

Perhaps I’m a Luddite. And you know what? I’m OK with that. I’d prefer to be stuck in the last century than to look and live like some kind of Star Trekkian android.

Even so, I wish nothing but the best of luck to Google and Luxottica in making high-fashion face computers.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

Want a Glam Tracksuit? Giuseppe Zanotti’s Got You

-------

Giuseppe Zanotti

When it comes to more-is-more aesthetics, Giuseppe Zanotti doesn’t need lessons. Through his shoes, bags, and accessories, he’s established himself as an expert of embellishment, a wizard of zippers, and a guru of gilt. For sky-high, strappy, spiked heels, he’s your guy. In the market for a pump with a built-in metallic snake to caress your ankle? Zanotti has it covered. By that token, his inaugural ready-to-wear micro-capsule—tracksuits for men and women that debut exclusively here—should come as a delight to those buying his distinctive brand of glam. Hers comes in leather with dangling gold accents standing in for traditional drawstrings; his comes with a generous helping of straps. Both versions boast quilted kneepads and gleaming zipper accents. Zanotti (who celebrates the twentieth anniversary of his label, Giuseppe Zanotti Design, this year) recruited fashion’s favorite tracksuit maven, Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, to shoot and style the campaign. “She understood the idea that sometimes less is more, but for me, more is more,” Zanotti told Style.com. “She styled maybe four, five different bracelets [with the looks]!” But if Donatella levels of bling aren’t your bag, or you’re dubious about the prospect of what amounts to a formal tracksuit, Zanotti is happy to advise. “I imagine somebody might love to pair the pants with Nike sneakers, a T-shirt, and a nice Rolex watch or something.” Minimalist styling tips from a master of maximalism? We’ll take ’em.

Photo: Courtesy of Giuseppe Zanotti

FIT Unzips the Story Behind the Moto Jacket

-------

Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket

“We had to start with the basics,” explained FIT graduate student and curator Kristen Haggerty. She’s talking about the origins of the university’s just-launched exhibition, Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket, a study of the motorcycle jacket’s evolution from a utilitarian Schott Bros. basic, to a symbol of post-WWII rebellion, to the modern-day fashion staple. “The first Perfecto was made in 1928 and was sold by Harley-Davidson—it’s really what everyone thinks of when they think of a biker jacket,” said Haggerty, gesturing to a 1980 replica of the late twenties belted classic with an exposed zipper. “Yes, it’s a very stylish garment, but every one of those elements means something.”

Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket

The show, which opens with an in-depth examination of the iconic Perfecto, combines documentary photography, press clippings, and a tightly curated collection of original pieces to shed light on the now 80-some-year history of the moto. Wares by Helmut Lang, Rick Owens, and a particularly memorable tutu moto jacket from Comme des Garçons’ Spring 2005 outing display the many ways in which fashion designers have appropriated and interpreted the garment. “Over the years, the Perfecto became something much more than a utilitarian biker jacket,” Haggerty told Style.com. “There were times when it was pretty subversive. Modern designers [have also] really gone above and beyond. It’s a garment that can exist in two different places at the same time, and have meaning for both of them.” All one needs to do is browse a rack at Versace, Chloé, Balmain, or Saint Laurent to see what she’s talking about. The exhibition, however, will help you understand and, dare we say, appreciate it.

Beyond Rebellion will be on view at The Museum at FIT, Tuesdays through Fridays, through April 5.

Photos: Courtesy of The Museum at FIT