Style.com

April 21 2014

styledotcom Brace yourselves. You're in for a real treat: stylem.ag/1eNmgYn

Subscribe to Style Magazine
99 posts tagged "Victoria Beckham"

Shop the Look: Water Colors

-------

Shop The Look: Water Colors

If Resort ’14 and Tommy Ton’s latest street-style snaps are any indication, the fashion set has got the blues. No need to wait for the Cruise collections to hit stores, though—embrace the shade this summer with cerulean, cobalt, and cornflower wares from J.Crew, Proenza Schouler, Gucci, and more. Shop summer’s water-colored hues, below.

1. J.Crew maxi dress, $350, available at www.net-a-porter.com

2. Proenza Schouler clutch, $1,450, available at www.barneys.com

3. Gucci gladiator sandals, $850, available at www.neimanmarcus.com

4. Illamasqua nail varnish in Caress, $17, www.sephora.com

5. Victoria Beckham aviator sunglasses, $495, available at www.net-a-porter.com

Intarsia-gram!

-------

Who can resist a novelty sweater? Over the past few seasons, pullovers emblazoned with Givenchy’s snarling rottweilers and Kenzo’s tigers have become status symbols for the street-style set. Designers’ message for Fall: There is plenty more where those came from. Jeremy Scott and Raf Simons sent tongue-in-cheek intarsia knits down their runways, and Christopher Kane’s turtleneck depicting a healthy human brain electrified with ideas is destined to become a collector’s item. Others took a more classic approach. Sweaters inlaid with feminine floral motifs turned up at Billy Reid, Sister by Sibling, and Antonio Marras, while Victoria Beckham, Derek Lam, and Louise Goldin (left) stuck with graphic, geometric patterns.

Here, the best of Fall’s intarsia knits.

The Must-Have Accessories of Fall 2013, According to the Editors

-------

Each season, Style.com’s market director, Marina Larroudé, combs through every collection to find the most covetable accoutrements. In our Fall 2013 Accessories Index, she highlights the best and biggest trends—from funny furs and demure pearls to spikes, studs, and combat boots. We couldn’t help but pick our own favorites, so below, the Style.com editors reveal what we’ll be craving come fall.

“It’s a long process to work on the Accessories Index. We feature almost 200 brands and around 5,000 images. Every season, I like to discover new brands to add to our list. It’s unfair to ask me for a favorite accessory, but I would be happy to have Rochas’ earrings, any Prada shoe, or any Victoria Beckham day bag.” —Marina Larroudé, market director

“I love the schoolmarm-meets-sexpot look of this Narciso Rodriguez pump.” —Nicole Phelps, executive editor

“In my imagination, I’m that chic kind of girl who cabs to and from appointments in a pair of single-sole Manolos. In reality, I’m subway-ing everywhere and need shoes I can really stomp around in. These lug-soled Stella McCartney beauties are the footwear equivalent of all-terrain vehicles, placing them at the top of my must-have list for fall.” —Brittany Adams, associate fashion editor Continue Reading “The Must-Have Accessories of Fall 2013, According to the Editors” »

Woo-hoo! Juergen Teller Opens at the ICA

-------

Artist, photographer, and all-around troublemaker Juergen Teller’s latest exhibition, Woo, opens at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts tomorrow. And, as always with Teller’s work, it promises to be a visual and conceptual feast. Covering the photographer’s extensive career, which spans over twenty years, the show will include some of his most iconic fashion and pop-culture works, like images of Vivienne Westwood (above), Kurt Cobain, Lily Cole, and Kate Moss (below), as well as shots from his innovative and sometimes shocking Marc Jacobs campaigns (remember when he shot Victoria Beckham’s suggestively parted legs popping out of an MJ shopping bag?).

Teller’s photographs aren’t all fashion focused, though—his art photography, which most recently includes landscapes and intimate family portraits, will be featured, as will shots and witty writings from his controversial column in Die Zeit magazine (think photos of Teller passed out next to a roasted pig’s head). The letters of complaint that Teller’s Die Zeit contributions elicited from readers will be proudly displayed next to the photographer’s work.

Woo runs from January 23 through March 17 at London’s ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH, +44 20 7930 3647.

Photos: Above—Juergen Teller, Vivienne Westwood No.3, London, 2009; Below—Juergen Teller, Kate Moss No.12, Gloucestershire, 2010. Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin Gallery

Diving Into The Fashion World, Feet First

-------

Let’s be real here. Fashion is a hypercompetitive industry full of people who can be witheringly (but often hilariously) critical of each other. So when it comes time for an awards gala, wherein the members of the fashion scene must play nice and hand out plaudits to their peers, most people cope by sighing into their free Champagne and mumbling that so-and-so was sorely overlooked…as usual. But every so often, an award is given out to a designer who is so self-evidently deserving that only the most vicious fashion misanthrope could protest. Such was the case recently at the Footwear News FN Awards, where Charlotte Dellal took home the Designer of the Year honor for her rapidly expanding five-year-old brand, Charlotte Olympia. This has been a threshold year for Dellal, one that saw her launch a range of bridal footwear, collaborate with Victoria Beckham, and open her first stateside store on New York’s Upper East Side. More generally, 2012 was the year that Charlotte Olympia firmly and finally established itself as a go-to brand for VIPs looking to rock a glam shoe on the red carpet. (Or anywhere else, for that matter.) Here, the cool and impeccably coiffed Dellal talks to Style.com about gilded platforms, her brand’s evolution, and the importance of having a sense of humor.


Congratulations! I guess this is as good a time as any to ask you that burning fashion question: What is the deal with women and shoes?
You mean, why do women love shoes? I always have a hard time with that one. They just do. I think, maybe, it has something to do with the fact that they’re objects—beautiful objects that you can wear. They look good on, and they look good off.

Did you always know you wanted to design shoes?
Actually, I wanted to do fashion design. Or so I thought. But when I did my foundation course, my tutor suggested I go into Cordwainers and train to make shoes. All my sketches of clothes were heavily accessorized. So I was accessory-focused from the beginning, I guess. And I do love accessories. I love how they personalize a look—you can be wearing the most sober outfit, and add an amazing shoe, a crazy bag, a hat, whatever, and make it something else entirely. It’s that old Hollywood, 1940s thing that I love so much; a way of not just finishing a look, but really elaborating it with your own sense of style.

You have a very distinctive, ’40s Hollywood-inflected personal style, and that’s reflected in Charlotte Olympia. When you design, are you designing for yourself?
Yes and no. I mean, as a designer, you create things that you love, don’t you? And as a female designer, it’s pretty inevitable that you create things that you love and want to wear. They go hand in hand. For me, anyway. So, of course, my sensibility is in the brand; it wouldn’t work otherwise. But my experiences as a woman also inform my sense of what’s missing in the market. Launching bridal—that came pretty directly out of my own experience of being a bride. I was looking around at the shoe options, and it was all, various shades of white and off-white. Like, peep-toe heels and things. And of course, I love color, I love pattern, and I just felt like, well, on your wedding of all days, you should be wearing a pair of shoes you really love, that represent who you are. I had on a huge dress, no one was going to see my shoes, but it made me happy knowing that I had on a pair of leopard-print pumps. And then, in the meantime, I did have women coming to the shop, and buying, like, red shoes to wear at their weddings. So I saw this niche.

How do you see your line as having evolved since you launched five years ago?
Well, this is obvious, but it’s gotten a lot bigger. My first few collections, I was only doing 140mm heels, with the recessed platform. That was about establishing an aesthetic, by the way; it wasn’t that I thought all women should wear super-high heels all the time. But I wanted to establish a silhouette, and a certain…I guess the only way to say it is a certain glamour. You know, as an aside, my true signature, initially, was the recessed gold platform. Some people saw that as really bling-y, but my thinking was, you know, it’s a recessed platform; when you wear the shoe, it’s under your foot, and so all that is is a little golden glow underfoot. A little magic, because—why not? Anyway. Sorry to digress, I just always felt like that gold platform was misunderstood. And of course now I design all sort of shoes—flats, sandals, the whole lot. Plus bags, now, too.

Are there other categories you’d like to explore?
There are lots of things I’d love to do, eventually. Like hats—I’m a big fan of hats, and I’ve been working with Piers Atkinson on some styles. I don’t need to do hats in-house; not right now. There are a lot of milliners I respect. Down the line, who knows? But anything that develops, it will develop organically. I like to joke that my accessories have accessories. Like, the bags started because I wanted a Perspex clutch to match the Perspex heels in a collection. And here we are, doing all these bags. And I love it. The novelty bags we make each season, they’re like the exclamation point at the end of the collection.

Do you have any shoe heroes?
Salvatore Ferragamo. The old Salvatore Ferragamo—the man. He used all this wonderful color and amazing materials. And of course, he was from the era that I love and made special shoes for the Hollywood actresses that have inspired me. And then, of course, when I was a child, my mother’s closet was full of Manolos. And when you’re a child, you’re always in your mother’s closet, trying on her shoes. Again, so many wonderful colors. And such a distinctive femininity—I still really appreciate that.

People tend to talk about your shoes being glamorous. It’s a word you use quite a bit yourself. But I feel like they rarely point out that your shoes are also kind of…funny. You know they’re funny, right?
Of course! I like to bring a sense of humor to my designs. A little silliness.What I really love to do is to play with the obvious—my collections are usually inspired by places, and I love doing things like, when we did the Paris collection, playing on all these Parisian super-clichés, like frou-fy poodles and the Eiffel Tower. I like to make the obvious more obvious. But it’s like I was saying, about the gold platform—why not? It’s so much easier to be bold or silly or over-the-top with your shoes than with pretty much any other part of your wardrobe. I can easily understand women who are shy about wearing some kind of crazy dress. But having fun with shoes? That never hurt anyone.

Photo: Julia Kennedy