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April 21 2014

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28 posts tagged "Vinoodh Matadin"

EXCLUSIVE: Inez & Vinoodh Add Color, and Soon, Clothes, to Their Repertoire

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Camille Bidault Waddington in Inez & Vinoodh jewelry

It didn’t take much time for Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin’s fine jewelry collection, Pretty Much Everything, to take off. But that’s no real surprise. After twenty-seven years in the biz, the renowned photographers and artists have a pretty good idea of what we fashion folk (and folks in general, for that matter) want—and they deliver. For their sophomore outing, the husband-and-wife pair continued to play with the interlocking-ring concept—modeled on their own wedding bands—with which they began last September. However, this time around, they’ve introduced new proportions, stones, and a rainbow of colors via a series of stackable enamel rings in varying widths. “There’s so much color in our heads because of how we live, and we couldn’t find the shades we wanted in actual gemstones,” said Van Lamsweerde of their choice to experiment with enamel. Ranging from lavender to shocking pink to electric yellow and beyond, the hues on offer were inspired by Inez & Vinoodh’s enviable New York apartment. So it’s fitting that the duo tapped their architect, Simrel Achenbach of Descience Lab, to help make the tints a reality. “Simrel has also created the paints for Francesco Clemente for years, so he knows a lot about color.” While that’s perhaps the understatement of the century, the team-up paid off. Who else could perfectly translate the orange of a Leonor Fini painting, the blue of an Yves Klein coffee table, or the shade of the family couch into jewelry?

The rings debut exclusively above in a portrait—lensed by the designers, naturally—of stylist Camille Bidault Waddington. “A lot of the furniture and art found in our apartment stems from the seventies, and Camille’s personal style and sense of color is very reminiscent of the eclectic and ethereal chic of that time,” said the couple. “Women can stack and combine all fifteen colors differently to amplify their mood or personality, and Camille’s portrait is the first in a series of magnificent people wearing their personal combinations.”

Pretty Much Everything

Elsewhere, there were wide, 18-karat white gold, rose gold, yellow gold, and oxidized silver bangles, each of which was attached to a contrasting metal band or a string of vivid stones or white pearls. Also new were precious iterations of their signature ring and star necklaces that come in strands of sapphires, rubies, emeralds, very rare Sleeping Beauty turquoise, or pearls. Slim bracelets garnished with diamond, emerald, ruby, sapphire, or Tahitian-pearl-embellished chains felt delicate and bohemian, while pavé diamond earrings oozed a decadent breed of cool. Currently carried by Net-a-Porter, Barneys New York, and Colette, among other retailers, the range, according to Van Lamsweerde, “has that chic, hippie vibe that I love, especially when it’s layered with pieces from our first collection. It’s fine, but it’s personal and easy—it’s not a statement, but at the same time, it still says that you understand fashion.”

Going forward, Inez & Vinoodh plan to expand their enamel selection and—get this—are working toward an apparel launch. “I can’t say anything yet, but you can expect it in the fall,” teased Van Lamsweerde. “Similar to our jewelry line, it will include things that we feel like we’re missing.” When asked why, with her and Matadin’s exhausting list of projects (major campaigns, music videos, perfume, and editorials are just some of their recent endeavors), they’re taking on yet another venture, Van Lamsweerde laughed. “We’ve learned so much from all the incredible people we’ve worked with throughout the years. Everyone is constantly feeding us input, and it’s too much fun. So, we thought, Why not?”

Photo: Inez & Vinoodh 

Miu Miu Taps Blue’s Two

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Lea Seydoux and Adele Exarchopoulos in Miu Miu's Resort campaign

Blue Is the Warmest Color heated up Cannes, just arrived in U.S. theaters, and now has the Miu Miu seal of approval. Miuccia Prada tapped the film’s Palme d’Or-winning stars, Léa Seydoux (who has been the face of Prada in the past) and Adèle Exarchopoulos, for Miu Miu’s Resort campaign, shot by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin. A word to the wise for the prurient: The film is NC-17; the campaign, PG.

Photos: Courtesy of Miu Miu

EXCLUSIVE: Inez & Vinoodh Add Design to Their Docket

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Inez and Vinoodh

More often than not, “love at first sight” is written off as bullshit. But somehow, Dutch husband-and-wife photography duo Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin manage to make it a believable concept. “We knew the first time we met,” said van Lamsweerde while eying Matadin from across the table in their downtown New York studio. The year was 1986, and they became acquainted while at art school. “We each had a different partner, so it just wasn’t possible. But we worked together on and off for six years without dating,” she continued. “And then we met on the street in Amsterdam, went for a coffee, and it all sort of clicked.”

In the more than two-and-a-half decades since that initial encounter, the couple has married, had a son, Charles, and built a veritable fashion and art photography empire. You’d be hard-pressed to flip through a magazine’s September issue without stumbling upon an Inez & Vinoodh-lensed editorial, or one of the Fall campaigns they shot for Jason Wu, Balmain, Valentino, or a bevy of other powerhouses. Oh, and of course, they’re responsible for Lady Gaga’s latest album cover and video. Their next creative endeavor? A collaborative jewelry collection with TenThousandThings. “It’s a love project,” explains van Lamsweerde. “And it’s about having something to commemorate the love you have for your partner, your child, your best friend, your co-worker…”

The seeds were planted last year while the couple was working on a charity project with TenThousandThings’ David Rees and Ron Anderson. Before they wrapped, Matadin enlisted the jewelers’ help to design a one-off necklace for van Lamsweerde—an oxidized silver chain garnished with a pavé drop, two linked circles (representative of the couple’s wedding rings), and a star pendant. “That’s a symbol for Charles, because his middle name is Star,” said van Lamsweerde. “I started wearing it right away, and everyone would ask me, ‘Where did you get that?’ So it grew into more.” The photographers worked with Rees and Anderson to create a carefully considered debut range, which began with ten of the intertwined wedding-band necklaces (ten because Charles celebrated his tenth birthday this year). Each piece (available in oxidized silver, 18-karat rose or yellow gold, or leather) is garnished with various charms—a ruby resembling a drop of blood, a turquoise heart, a diamond briolette, a white Tahitian pearl, and more. An eleventh necklace combines all the trinkets on one chain. The same concept applies to the collection’s delicate rings, earrings, and bracelets, and van Lamsweerde and Matadin plan to update the offering biannually.

Lou and Keren

Naturally, the pair shot their own campaign—a selection of black-and-white images that depict friends and lovers including Stefano Pilati and his boyfriend, Christiaan Schoonis; The Misshapes; Charles and his best friend, Stella (“It only took ten frames; he’s seen a lot of people strike poses for us,” said van Lamsweerde, laughing); musicians Lou Doillon and Keren Ann (van Lamsweerde describes them as sisters in singing and songwriting); and van Lamsweerde and Matadin themselves. The latter two images debut here.

The collection—priced between $450 and $19,000—can be found at Colette, Net-a-Porter, and Barneys New York this September, and will officially launch via a personal appearance at Barneys’ Madison Avenue store on September 7 at 3 p.m. The event will also celebrate the pair’s Byredo fragrance, 1996, and offer a sneak peek at their forthcoming Taschen book, Pretty Much Everything, which follows a traveling retrospective of the same title.

So considering they’ve conquered the worlds of photography, art, and—now—design, it seemed only appropriate to ask the photographers if they felt like they had done, well, pretty much everything. “No,” said Matadin. “We’re working on a movie…. It’s just meetings in Hollywood now. It will take a bit of time.” No doubt they’ll enjoy spending that “bit of time” together.

Photo: Inez & Vinoodh

Diesel Takes It to the Streets—Cyber-Style

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Diesel's new campaignDiesel's new campaign

When Nicola Formichetti stepped into his role as Diesel’s artistic director back in April, he told us that he’d be making some big digital moves. “I want to crowdsource using social media and start getting the armies together, because I can’t do this alone,” he explained, citing Reboot, Diesel’s ongoing Tumblr project, as the first step. Today we learned that the social media maven turned to the micro-blogging site to cast his first ad campaign for Diesel. “I wanted to find people who reflected the diversity of the creative community today and not just the typical model,” Formichetti told WWD. The denim label’s artistic director chose twenty creatives—from graffiti artists to teenage film students—to star in the Inez & Vinoodh-lensed fall adverts. There were, however, a few familiar faces, among them game changer Casey Legler, the first female model to be signed to a men’s division.

Photos: Inez & Vinoodh

“Applause,” Please: Brandon Maxwell Talks Styling Lady Gaga’s Latest Video

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Just in case you haven’t gotten your fill of Lady Gaga’s paint-smeared face, it’s back in the video for “Applause,” the first single to (officially) drop from the singer’s forthcoming album, Artpop. Fittingly, for the woman devoted to living her life as a live-action editorial shoot, the video was directed by fashion photographers Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, who also shot Artpop‘s cover and Gaga’s four September V covers. “For me, it was one of the most memorable experiences that we’ve ever had,” Gaga’s stylist, Brandon Maxwell, told Style.com when asked about working with the photographers. Of course, the clothes—like an archival John Galliano gown accessorized with duct tape and safety-pin baubles by Mathieu Mirano, and Valentino Couture lingerie paired with Alaïa boots—added to the excitement.

“The concept was really, What would you do for the applause?” explained Maxwell. Donning a custom Gareth Pugh pillow gown (which explodes around a black catsuit by Mila Schön) and a Maison Martin Margiela Couture jacket (Gaga wears it atop a mirror-and-pin costume conceived by her sister, Natali Germanotta) seems a good place to start. However, Maxwell stressed that some of Gaga’s most memorable looks boast a DIY touch. “Nobody loves clothes and couture more than Gaga, but I think some of her most famous costumes are things that she made with her own two hands,” asserted the stylist. “So there are parts of the video that are incredible for fashion people—like, I was basically crying during that whole Galliano scene. But she has a huge fan base, and I like to choose pieces—whether they’re off the runway or made by us—that some of these kids can make at home.” This time around, those items included seashell pasties; a floating bikini bottom that Gaga’s in-house Renaissance man, Perry Meek, assembled from fresh flowers, glue, and string; and a surreal top by Jean-Charles de Castelbajac shaped to look as though two gloved hands are grasping Gaga’s breasts. The pop star also wears assemblage-style wings—fashioned from broken umbrella spokes—by L.A.-based Junker Designs. Continue Reading ““Applause,” Please: Brandon Maxwell Talks Styling Lady Gaga’s Latest Video” »