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April 24 2014

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1 posts tagged "Wantworthy"

Wantworthy Offers Web Wish Fulfillment

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The best ideas on the Web seem to be the simplest ones that make life easier. One that you may have wished for (or wished you thought of) is Wantworthy.com, a newish, user-friendly site that allows an online shopper to consolidate all of the items she might like to buy in one tidy place. After a quick sign-up, drag the “I Want It” button to the bookmark toolbar, which you then click while browsing that Alexander Wang bag on Net-A-Porter, those J Brand jeans on Shopbop.com, and those perfect Henleys on JCrew.com. A window opens, you click “Save,” and voilà: When you visit your page, there they all are, ready to be organized by price, retailer, or any other category you care to impose. It’s a particular boon for single-brand sites that usually don’t have their own wish list feature.

The story behind Wantworthy is Zuckerberg-esque, with precocious roots on an Ivy League campus. The site was conceived a little less than a year ago by very recent University of Pennsylvania grads Lauren McDevitt and Josh Wais, both 23. McDevitt was clicking away at sites like Anthropologie.com and UrbanOutfitters.com and realized she needed a way to organize. By February, the pair had a working version of Wantworthy, which was well received by its few hundred users—mostly friends, classmates, and friends-of-friends. Their beta site went up in June, just after they graduated and moved to New York, where they launched the real deal recently. Wantworthy’s interface is refreshingly clean, not overly laden with editorial content, aside from a few lists curated by bloggers and Wais and McDevitt themselves. The newest feature allows you to share your picks with a few fashionable pals, but Wais is adamant about keeping to their organic path of development and steering clear of the Twitter and Facebook models of competitively racking up followers or friends. “We want it to function the way you would in real life,” he says. “You wouldn’t be asking a hundred people if you should buy something, you’d ask five.”

Photo: Wantworthy.com