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July 28 2014

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33 posts tagged "Yohji Yamamoto"

Byronesque.com Brings Its Vintage Treasures Offline

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Byronesque.com//Offline

Last year, Gill Linton launched Byronesque.com, a comprehensive Web site that, backed by Andrew Rosen and the late Marvin Traub, offers high-end vintage wares and sharp editorials. The online platform boasts a veritable treasure trove of rare, authenticated vintage designs, like an azure Jean Paul Gaultier frock, an asymmetrical Yohji Yamamoto dress, and a bevy of Thierry Mugler and Alaïa. And while it all looks spectacular in one’s browser, Linton felt she should create an IRL experience with the digital destination’s best stock.

Enter the site’s first brick-and-mortar venture, Byronesque.com//Offline, an exhibition and boutique housed in the dilapidated annex of the James A. Farley Post Office in New York City. Offline is complete with video installations, melancholic wall art by Craig Ward, and a vault of approximately forty impeccably dressed mannequins. Yesterday evening, insiders gathered to fete the project, which was punctuated with a live Polaroid photography session by the inimitable Michèle Lamy. “It’s difficult to [decide] what is mainstream or not…but being here feels real, and what they are trying to do is very important,” Lamy said of the site.

Byronesque.com//Offline

“There’s so much potential in vintage fashion,” said Linton. “It’s made better, there’s a story behind it, and there’s a history behind it. The way I merchandise the store is through storytelling—there’s a curve of Vivienne Westwood from Pirate to Seditionaries, for example—but it’s not that it has to be a linear progression. It’s about the energy of stuff.”

The stuff on display includes a 1984 John Galliano men’s kimono coat from his graduate Central Saint Martins collection, Les Incroyables (not for sale); a burlap Alexander McQueen look from F/W ’02; a 1986 Azzedine Alaïa leather zip dress; and a Katharine Hamnett allover marijuana-leaf-print bodysuit.

Glenn O’Brien lent his support by co-hosting the affair. “Everybody mixes vintage in,” he said, “I can’t tell you how long I’ve had this Kilgour, French, & Stanbury coat; it must be twenty years since I bought it at Barneys. Vintage is kind of where the next ideas come from. You can be a step ahead by wearing something that’s so out that it’s just about ready to come back.”

Byronesque.com//Offline will open to the public on December 12 and run through the 15th. Located at the James A. Farley Post Office on Eighth Avenue at West 31st Street, the show will be open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Photos: Courtesy Photos/div>

Tilda Swinton: Fashion’s Muse for Eternity

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Tilda Swinton

Olivier Saillard—author, poet, star fashion curator—tends to prefer a contemplative moment over a grand event. He is also fond of saying that, had he ever studied fashion design, he would have done “just one dress” and then retired his tape measure.

Last night in Paris, he offered both. Eternity Dress, a fifty-one-minute performance starring Tilda Swinton, sponsored by Chloé, and staged at the École des Beaux-Arts this week as part of the city’s fall festival, has been sold out for months. In it, Saillard and Swinton explore the art of dressmaking, starting with lines and measurements (waist: 28 inches, and so forth) working up through flat patterns and the beginnings of a dress, which Swinton took a moment to sew on herself. As the dress took form, Swinton recited a litany of collar styles in French and released a world of emotion in the turn of a sleeve, finally draping herself in rich-hued chiffon and velvet unfurled from bolts lined up on the floor.

Ultimately, The Dress—a black sheath with long sleeves and an open back—was a stand-in for a century of fashion history, from Paul Poiret to Comme des Garçons. One of the show’s high points, as well as its biggest laugh, showed Swinton striking a series of emblematic poses for houses from Poiret to Yohji Yamamoto, by way of Chanel, Dior, Mugler, YSL, and Jean Paul Gaultier. Among a roomful of designers including Gaultier, Christian Lacroix, Bouchra Jarrar, Martine Sitbon, and Clare Waight Keller, Haider Ackermann was first on his feet for the ovation. “It’s absolutely a piece of my life,” said Waight Keller. “They’ve taken everyday materials like tape and chalk and elevated them to an art form about designing a dress from scratch. It’s about craft, measuring, and a considered approach. It’s poetry.”

Tilda Swinton

“One of the things about Tilda is that she can do anything,” noted Saillard after the performance. “She’s not a ‘fashion girl,’ so she can be a sculpture, an actress, a woman, a man, she can be 18 or 75 years old. It was like we were in a bubble, and the experience gave us lots of new ideas. Fashion has to be surprising.”

At the small cocktail party held afterward at Lapérouse, Swinton added, “Olivier is a playmate. We work and play together and come up with crackers ideas for some other time—it’s wonderful to be able to play off of someone like that.” Asked whether she realizes that she would be any designer’s dream to work with, Swinton let loose a small bombshell: “Maybe it’s because I know nothing about fashion!”

Photos: Vincent Lappartient

Happy Birthday, Dear Joseph

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Joseph Window

There are only a handful of shops worldwide as iconic as the Joseph on 77 Fulham Road, or known in the fashion world simply as 77. With a prized position in the heart of South Kensington, Joseph is flanked on both sides by some other icons: Daphne’s, Princess Diana’s favorite restaurant; Boujis, her son Harry’s current nightclub of choice; and, of course, Bibendum in the Michelin House, where loyal customers have been enjoying oysters and champagne for generations. That was where yours truly first met the late, great Joseph Ettedgui in 2003, sipping his espresso and puffing a cigar, those eyes squinting behind his trademark round glasses in the glorious October sun, as he put his paper down to fill me in on details of the project at that moment in his life—the renovation of his home. During our many conversations, a constant stream of people was always stopping to say hello. Joseph Ettedgui was the most popular guy in the hood, his charms and charisma irresistible.

September 14 marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of 77, and celebrations are afoot for the man who brought Kenzo, Castelbajac, Alaïa, and Yamamoto to the world and who basically created the mold for concept stores like Colette and Dover Street Market. Celebrations start by revealing twenty-five quotes from Joseph’s nearest and dearest, like Naomi Campbell, Katie Grand, and Alexandra Shulman, and they’ll live on the Joseph Web site during London fashion week.

There will also be a window during LFW designed by Vanity Fair‘s Michael Roberts, a great friend and confidante of Joseph’s who, back in the day, worked as a stylist and was all but Joseph’s “right-hand man.” The window is inspired by one of Joseph’s only fashion shows, held around twenty-five years ago, styled by Roberts, where body mapping was somewhat of a thing. Louise Trotter, Joseph’s creative director, has also created a Haring jacquard jumper, inspired by the same fashion show, which will hit the shops September 14. On the eve of the anniversary, Style.com sat down with Roberts to discuss Mr. Ettedgui, who died from cancer in 2010, at age 74.

What are your fondest memories of both Josephs—the man and the brand?
I would see Joseph with a cigar and a coffee, listening attentively, and then motivating you to just “do it.” He was a doer, making sure that things got done. There would be one central meeting, then he would spring into action. Once you had done what it was you set out to do, he would become almost childlike, exclaiming and jumping up and down in celebration and excitement. Continue Reading “Happy Birthday, Dear Joseph” »

Sir Paul Tells All in The Talks’ One Hundredth Interview

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Paul SmithWriter and Style Map contributor Sven Schumann founded online magazine The Talks in 2011, launching the site with nine interviews, which included subjects such as Valentino, Mick Jagger, and Patti Smith. In the two years since, Schumann hasn’t stopped talking, racking up Q&As with cultural titans such as Yohji Yamamoto, Woody Allen, Helen Mirren, and Salman Rushdie.

This morning, the site fetes its one hundredth chat, with inimitable Brit Sir Paul Smith. Since opening his first menswear shop, in 1970, Smith has built an empire of more than two hundred shops on his cheeky interpretations of Savile Row cuts—all while maintaining an almost infamous reputation as one of fashion’s “nice guys.”

So why choose Smith for this milestone moment? On top of his fabled status as a designer, “Paul’s story is ultimately that nice guys do sometimes finish first,” Schumann tells Style.com. “And I always love talking to older people, who have lived life and can reflect and share their wisdom.”

In his Talks interview, Smith chats about the livestock that’s passed through the Paul Smith reception, unusual fan mail, and the soundtrack to his hangovers. Catch the full interview on The Talks’ Web site.

Photos: James Mooney

Yohji Yamamoto on the Old, the New, and the Now

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Just in time for Berlin’s Gallery Weekend, Yohji Yamamoto descended upon the city for “Yamamoto in Berlin.” The four-day Yohji extravaganza boasted the debut of 5 Cuts—a collaborative video installation, with art space Made, that details Yamamoto’s views on love, life, and creation—as well as the opening of an exhibition by Yamamoto’s set designer, Masao Nihei, and a special runway show comprising Yamamoto’s greatest hits since 1992.

The Japanese designer’s visit to the city was eagerly anticipated by the fashion industry and scenesters alike, only growing stronger through all the rumors about his presence (“I heard he’s using ‘real’ people in the show!”) and the battalion of branded Yohji Yamamoto Audi shuttle cars that invaded the streets of Berlin. The biggest expectations of the visit, however, were perhaps those of the designer himself. “I was dreaming about how Berlin would have changed,” he said after his runway show. “I was here twenty-three years ago, with Wim Wenders, who was editing my movie. At that time, the wall was still up, and I took a tour around it. I was dreaming that Berlin might have changed in a good way—keeping good traditional points, constructing new [modern] buildings, and maintaining this strong mix between the two. But after arriving here, I was a bit disappointed. It looks too flat.” If he was disappointed by Germany, he hasn’t been disappointed by the German people. “I have been working in Paris for about thirty-one years, but most of my closest friends are all German,” he said. “I came here because Berlin is close to Eastern Europe and Russia. It’s a chance to connect with the new market.”

After more than three decades in the business, Yamamoto continues to strive for the new—new designs, new customers, and new twists of fate for his once-beleaguered business. His takeaway from it all? “Keep being yourself, then you will feel the new wind start blowing,” he offered. “People started getting tired about fast fashion and too-luxurious accessories. So I felt a new wind starting to blow. People started looking for something real, something serious to wear. I’m talking about clothing. As proof, continuously for the last two years, my new company has been making money. It was a big surprise.”

Photos: Maxime Ballesteros (Portrait); Alonso Dominguez (Runway show)