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April 18 2014

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31 posts tagged "Yohji Yamamoto"

Happy Birthday, Dear Joseph

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Joseph Window

There are only a handful of shops worldwide as iconic as the Joseph on 77 Fulham Road, or known in the fashion world simply as 77. With a prized position in the heart of South Kensington, Joseph is flanked on both sides by some other icons: Daphne’s, Princess Diana’s favorite restaurant; Boujis, her son Harry’s current nightclub of choice; and, of course, Bibendum in the Michelin House, where loyal customers have been enjoying oysters and champagne for generations. That was where yours truly first met the late, great Joseph Ettedgui in 2003, sipping his espresso and puffing a cigar, those eyes squinting behind his trademark round glasses in the glorious October sun, as he put his paper down to fill me in on details of the project at that moment in his life—the renovation of his home. During our many conversations, a constant stream of people was always stopping to say hello. Joseph Ettedgui was the most popular guy in the hood, his charms and charisma irresistible.

September 14 marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of 77, and celebrations are afoot for the man who brought Kenzo, Castelbajac, Alaïa, and Yamamoto to the world and who basically created the mold for concept stores like Colette and Dover Street Market. Celebrations start by revealing twenty-five quotes from Joseph’s nearest and dearest, like Naomi Campbell, Katie Grand, and Alexandra Shulman, and they’ll live on the Joseph Web site during London fashion week.

There will also be a window during LFW designed by Vanity Fair‘s Michael Roberts, a great friend and confidante of Joseph’s who, back in the day, worked as a stylist and was all but Joseph’s “right-hand man.” The window is inspired by one of Joseph’s only fashion shows, held around twenty-five years ago, styled by Roberts, where body mapping was somewhat of a thing. Louise Trotter, Joseph’s creative director, has also created a Haring jacquard jumper, inspired by the same fashion show, which will hit the shops September 14. On the eve of the anniversary, Style.com sat down with Roberts to discuss Mr. Ettedgui, who died from cancer in 2010, at age 74.

What are your fondest memories of both Josephs—the man and the brand?
I would see Joseph with a cigar and a coffee, listening attentively, and then motivating you to just “do it.” He was a doer, making sure that things got done. There would be one central meeting, then he would spring into action. Once you had done what it was you set out to do, he would become almost childlike, exclaiming and jumping up and down in celebration and excitement. Continue Reading “Happy Birthday, Dear Joseph” »

Sir Paul Tells All in The Talks’ One Hundredth Interview

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Paul SmithWriter and Style Map contributor Sven Schumann founded online magazine The Talks in 2011, launching the site with nine interviews, which included subjects such as Valentino, Mick Jagger, and Patti Smith. In the two years since, Schumann hasn’t stopped talking, racking up Q&As with cultural titans such as Yohji Yamamoto, Woody Allen, Helen Mirren, and Salman Rushdie.

This morning, the site fetes its one hundredth chat, with inimitable Brit Sir Paul Smith. Since opening his first menswear shop, in 1970, Smith has built an empire of more than two hundred shops on his cheeky interpretations of Savile Row cuts—all while maintaining an almost infamous reputation as one of fashion’s “nice guys.”

So why choose Smith for this milestone moment? On top of his fabled status as a designer, “Paul’s story is ultimately that nice guys do sometimes finish first,” Schumann tells Style.com. “And I always love talking to older people, who have lived life and can reflect and share their wisdom.”

In his Talks interview, Smith chats about the livestock that’s passed through the Paul Smith reception, unusual fan mail, and the soundtrack to his hangovers. Catch the full interview on The Talks’ Web site.

Photos: James Mooney

Yohji Yamamoto on the Old, the New, and the Now

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Just in time for Berlin’s Gallery Weekend, Yohji Yamamoto descended upon the city for “Yamamoto in Berlin.” The four-day Yohji extravaganza boasted the debut of 5 Cuts—a collaborative video installation, with art space Made, that details Yamamoto’s views on love, life, and creation—as well as the opening of an exhibition by Yamamoto’s set designer, Masao Nihei, and a special runway show comprising Yamamoto’s greatest hits since 1992.

The Japanese designer’s visit to the city was eagerly anticipated by the fashion industry and scenesters alike, only growing stronger through all the rumors about his presence (“I heard he’s using ‘real’ people in the show!”) and the battalion of branded Yohji Yamamoto Audi shuttle cars that invaded the streets of Berlin. The biggest expectations of the visit, however, were perhaps those of the designer himself. “I was dreaming about how Berlin would have changed,” he said after his runway show. “I was here twenty-three years ago, with Wim Wenders, who was editing my movie. At that time, the wall was still up, and I took a tour around it. I was dreaming that Berlin might have changed in a good way—keeping good traditional points, constructing new [modern] buildings, and maintaining this strong mix between the two. But after arriving here, I was a bit disappointed. It looks too flat.” If he was disappointed by Germany, he hasn’t been disappointed by the German people. “I have been working in Paris for about thirty-one years, but most of my closest friends are all German,” he said. “I came here because Berlin is close to Eastern Europe and Russia. It’s a chance to connect with the new market.”

After more than three decades in the business, Yamamoto continues to strive for the new—new designs, new customers, and new twists of fate for his once-beleaguered business. His takeaway from it all? “Keep being yourself, then you will feel the new wind start blowing,” he offered. “People started getting tired about fast fashion and too-luxurious accessories. So I felt a new wind starting to blow. People started looking for something real, something serious to wear. I’m talking about clothing. As proof, continuously for the last two years, my new company has been making money. It was a big surprise.”

Photos: Maxime Ballesteros (Portrait); Alonso Dominguez (Runway show)

Tokyo Fashion Week Comes to a Close

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Throughout Tokyo fashion week, we’ve had Misha Janette reporting on the city’s most exciting shows. To see Style.com’s complete Tokyo fashion week coverage, click here.

Day 6:
Saturday marked the sixth and final day of Tokyo fashion week, and it was dedicated to the city’s top menswear designers. Comme des Garçons itself doesn’t show in Tokyo, but it was exciting to see its youthful Ganryu label (left) take to the catwalk. Designed by Fumito Ganryu, who was formerly a patternmaker for Junya Watanabe, Ganryu showed a Fall '13 range that catered to an urban huntsman—a man who pairs cable-knit sweaters and puffy down vests with super low drop-crotch pants and high maintenance coifs. A dress shirt with trompe l’oeil vest appliqué showed off Ganryu’s progressive nature.

Facetasm focused on separates in its collection of layered workwear-cum-dress clothes. Kilts, slips, peplums, and sleeve-only bolero jackets all made an appearance. Each piece boasted its own details, like basket-weaving and original line drawings of a forest or old-school tattoos. For the women, there were formfitting silhouettes with pastel-colored ruffled trim.

Making its debut on Saturday was Mr. Gentleman, a brand headed by Takeshi “Big-O” Osumi of popular menswear brand Phenomenon, and Yuichi Yoshii, who is the director of Tokyo’s top multi-brand superstore, The Contemporary Fix. Together, they produced a casual and modern wardrobe that featured slim-cut tweed leisure suits and retro letterman jackets. For a twist, the designers showed a leather-lined and zipper-trimmed peacoat and an argyle-print jacket.

The week closed with a large-scale installation show by new label C.E. With former BAPE designer Skate Thing at its creative helm, the brand used 3-D mapping technology to create a kaleidoscopic fashion feast. C.E.’s standouts, like hoodies and colorful board shorts, furthered the familiar urban look that Skate Thing does best.

Photo: Giovanni Giannoni / Courtesy of WWD.com

Continue Reading “Tokyo Fashion Week Comes to a Close” »

Two Centuries Of Fashion History, Starring Tilda Swinton

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Christian Lacroix, Haider Ackermann, Martine Sitbon, Bruno Frisoni. They all gathered at the Palais de Tokyo last night for a one-of-a-kind, one-woman fashion show: The Impossible Wardrobe, conceived and curated by the Musée Galliera’s Olivier Saillard and starring none other than Tilda Swinton. The performance lasted nearly 40 minutes, or about four times the normal length of a fashion show. No one minded. On the contrary, the crowd gave the duo a standing ovation.

Wearing white gloves, a lab coat, and beige suede pumps, Swinton variously carried, clutched, and presented vintage clothes and accessories up and down the runway, making eye contact with the audience along the way and pausing in front of a mirror to measure up how she might look if she was allowed to put them on. “It’s not possible to wear the clothes in a museum,” Saillard said, by way of explaining the show’s concept and name. “If Tilda hadn’t accepted our proposal, we wouldn’t have done it.” Above Swinton, a news ticker spelled put the pieces’ provenance, and there were some truly special items here: a 1968 Paco Rabanne dress worn by Brigitte Bardot, Elsa Schiaparelli-designed gloves with built-in gold talons from 1936, an embroidered top that belonged to Isadora Duncan in the 1920s, even a tailcoat covered in gold bullion worn by Napoleon. The Oscar winner actually sniffed the collar on that one, as if to get a sense of his essence. “C’est sublime,” said Bouchra Jarrar afterward. “A new way to talk about the history of fashion. One must never forget history.” In the history of this season, this will rank as one of its most fabulous moments.

CLICK HERE for a slideshow of Swinton wearing some of the pieces from the Musée Galliera collection >


Photo: Piero Biasion