Style.com

August 21 2014

styledotcom 18 examples why you shouldn't be afraid of #MomJeans: stylem.ag/1ljq8UG pic.twitter.com/YhZInosHRu

Subscribe to Style Magazine
105 posts tagged "Yves Saint Laurent"

Apple Hires YSL Exec to Ramp Up Wearables Strategy

-------

apple

The latest in the trend of tech-to-fashion defections came this morning, as Apple announced that it had hired Catherine Monier, previously the head of retail  and European president of Yves Saint Laurent. Reportedly, Monier will be tasked with expanding Apple’s existing retail presence to better accommodate wearable technology. 9to5Mac says that former YSL CEO Paul Deneve, who joined the tech giant last summer, had a key hand in recruiting his ex-coworker. It’s not the first instance of newly minted Apple execs wooing away old colleagues to Apple’s Cupertino campus. Earlier this week it was announced that Musa Tariq, former social media chief for both Nike and Burberry, was tapped to become Apple’s director of digital marketing—reportedly at the personal recommendation of Angela Ahrendts.

Photo: apple.com

The Unapproved YSL Film Trailer Has Hit YouTube, and It’s Spicy

-------

Remember that other Yves Saint Laurent biopic that was announced last year? The one that didn’t get Pierre Bergé’s seal of approval? Well, the trailer for the film, which stars Gaspard Ulliel as the designer and Léa Seydoux as Loulou de la Falaise, hit YouTube today. And, featuring one minute and 50 seconds of sex, snakes, and cigarettes, it’s decidedly racy. In all seriousness, the latest movie explores the darker side of Saint Laurent’s life and relationships, which is likely why it didn’t get the thumbs-up from Bergé. But the approved flick, titled Yves Saint Laurent, didn’t really get the thumbs-up from critics and received mixed reviews. Somewhat ironically, the unapproved film, like the modern-day incarnation of the fashion house, is simply called Saint Laurent. Watch the trailer, above.

A Pretty Scandal: Revisiting the Fifties at the Palais Galliera

-------

Fifties dresses

Long before Olivier Saillard arrived to shake things up as director of the Palais Galliera, the fashion museum of the City of Paris had established a tradition of mounting exhibitions around a given decade, such as the twenties or thirties.

With The 50s: Fashion in France, 1947-1957, which opens on July 12, Saillard sought to honor that heritage and also remind the world that the fifties, at least in fashion terms, was a few years ahead of the Gregorian calendar. “It was really that revolutionary bomb of Christian Dior’s New Look in 1947 that brought the decade into the fifties,” Saillard commented during a preview. A decade later, Mr. Dior died suddenly and his young assistant, Yves Saint Laurent, moved to the helm. In between those bookends flourished what was arguably the last golden era of couture. “I like the idea of putting the couture heritage out there, because right now we’re seeing several young designers who are redeveloping it in their own way,” observed Saillard. “It’s also an era that’s joliment scandaleuse [prettily scandalous] as much at the beginning as the end.”

The Galliera’s considerable trove includes a lot of Dior. (Consider for a moment that by the mid-fifties, Dior alone accounted for 49 percent of French fashion’s total exports.) A Bar suit stands sentry at the entrance, followed swiftly by the rose pink Bonbon dress from Dior’s first collection and the asymmetrical peplumed Bernique (Winter ’50-’51), a recent discovery. But Saillard and his team bring to the fore other remarkable, iconic wares, including a 1954 Chanel suit (a look the Americans were quicker than the French to embrace, he noted, precisely because it was made to be worn from morning to cocktail hour). Elsewhere, a 1954 black Balenciaga suit that looks as though it could have stepped off the runway yesterday keeps company with pieces by Carven, Balmain, Fath, Givenchy, Cardin, Schiaparelli, and Saint Laurent, among others. All-but-unknowns get play, too, such as Jean Dessès, Grès, Henry a la Pensée, and Jacques Heim, a star of the time who costumed films such as Falbalas (known in English as Paris Frills).

“There’s a real feeling of destiny about this decade,” observed Saillard. “When you map out the stars, there are so many houses we still talk about. Givenchy, Saint Laurent, and Karl Lagerfeld were taking their first steps in fashion, and it’s also a time when future greats, such as Christian Lacroix and Jean Paul Gaultier, were born. So many names are anchored in that decade in one way or another, it’s very strange.”

The show’s staging resurrects old nuggets from fashion’s lexicon (day suit, day dress, late-afternoon dress, city dress, tea dress, travel coat, etc.), a reminder of how much things have changed. “Today it’s just a dress,” quipped Saillard, rattling off a few numbers that speak volumes, too: There were 106 couture houses in Paris in 1946, a number that had dwindled to thirty-six by 1958.

Given that there are more than a hundred pieces displayed, highlights are too numerous to list here, but they include clever beachwear (a yellow popover by Hermès practically begs for re-edition), accessories, and evening dresses once worn by style icons: the Duchess of Windsor’s Palmyre dress by Dior (1952) is one of the museum’s most precious pieces. Nearby, the 1957 Opium dress from Dior’s last collection (Winter 1957) was donated by Best Dressed legend Jacqueline de Ribes, who will be the subject of her own exhibition at the Met next year.

The 50s: Fashion in France, 1947-1957 runs from July 12 to November 2 at Paris’ Palais Galliera

Photo: Courtesy Photo

At the Taj Mahal, a Regional Woolmark Prize Victor Is Chosen

-------

woolmark-sizedANDAM. The LVMH Prize. CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund. The fashion industry is awash in awards these days. But of all the prizes for emerging designers, none has a more hallowed history than the one given out by Woolmark, which anointed both Yves Saint Laurent and Karl Lagerfeld in the 1950s. Since its relaunch in 2013, Woolmark’s International Prize has been good to its name, first feting Christian Wijnants of Belgium, and next tapping New Delhi-based Rahul Mishra in February of this year. Last week, on Wednesday, the competition geared up for another round of regionals, gathering together up-and-coming designers from India and the Middle East at the Taj Mahal Palace in Mumbai.

bird-on-a-wire-sizedMishra was on hand for the event, and he wasn’t just there to take a victory lap. He was one of the region’s judges, alongside The Business of Fashion founder Imran Amed and Vogue India senior fashion features editor Priyanka Khanna, among others, and the gala dinner at the Taj was capped by some brief catwalking of Mishra’s new capsule collection for luxury e-tailer MyTheresa (pictured, above). The MyTheresa pieces featured soigné, Western-style silhouettes, and intricate embroidery that nodded to India’s tradition in handicraft. Meanwhile, one of the guests at the event could be found wearing a colorful Mishra-designed sari—a key part of his business in a country where traditional dress is still widely favored.

Alas, there were no saris onstage as the regional finalists presented their looks at the dinner. There was, however, menswear, a new category for the Woolmark prize. The Emperor 1688, based in the United Arab Emirates and designed by the three Golkar brothers, was handed the golden ticket to the menswear final in London, and the brand’s natty, well-priced tailoring seems likely to have a global appeal. The womenswear finalist, meanwhile, was Bird on a Wire from Lebanon (pictured, left), and designer Rayya Morcos will go on to that final in Beijing later this year. In the interim, the Woolmark road show travels on: The U.S. regionals take place next week in New York City.

Photo: Courtesy of Woolmark Prize

iLifestyle, Coming Soon? Apple Taps Yet Another Fashion Exec

-------

Apple Hosts Its Worldwide Developers ConferenceWhen Apple poached Angela Ahrendts last year, it marked a major turning point for the megabrand—the former Burberry CEO was enlisted to bring Apple back to its roots and make it not just a tech brand, but a luxury lifestyle label. Paul Deneve, the former CEO of Yves Saint Laurent, also made the leap from fashion to Silicon Valley to work on special projects at Apple. Today, Vanessa Friedman of The New York Times reported that yet another fashion exec has made the jump to Apple. The sales vice president for TAG Heuer, Patrick Pruniaux, has been tapped for an unspecified role with the company.

Though it has not been confirmed, it looks like we might have the man who will helm that iWatch everyone has been buzzing about. When it was first announced that Deneve was joining Apple, there were plenty of rumors floating around that he would be taking on that project. Those turned out to be false. But who better than a TAG Heuer expert to best the competing Samsung Galaxy Gear watch?

With the iWatch reportedly due out in October and a new version of fashion’s greatest accessory, the iPhone, coming out this fall, Apple is busy preparing for some big releases.

But the bigger question remains: What else does it have up its sleeves? It’s now got an all-star team of veteran luxury executives, with presumably more joining it soon. But Ahrendts, who is the head of Apple’s retail and online stores, is a turnaround artist, and like Steve Jobs, she’s an exec with a vision. Certainly, wearable tech is where the focus is these days, with everyone from Google to Opening Ceremony to Nike getting into the game, but Apple hasn’t made its mark in this niche. Yet. Might we see an Apple wearable tech piece make its debut on the runways at New York fashion week, instead of in a more traditional rollout? We wouldn’t be a bit surprised.

Photo: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images