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April 20 2014

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95 posts tagged "Yves Saint Laurent"

Analyzing Helmut Lang’s Lasting Influence

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Kate Moss Helmut LangIn our new Throwback Thursdays video, Tim Blanks remembers Helmut Lang’s Spring 2005 show, a collection that wound up being the Austrian designer’s last for the label he founded. In the clip, Blanks calls Lang “the master of minimalism—possibly the most influential designer of his time, because what he did was such a clear reaction to what had come before. He changed the way clothes looked. He changed the way shows and models looked.” Now, nearly 10 years later, Lang remains a touchstone for a new generation of designers, who look to develop and interpret his ideas in the same way that a previous generation looked to the work of Yves Saint Laurent.

Watch the Throwback Thursday video with Tim Blanks here.

Here, a slideshow of the ways Lang continues to inspire today.

Ten Looks, One Show: The Industry’s Top Stylists Honor the Albright Fashion Library

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FIT x MAC Fashion Library

It’s been over ten years since Irene Albright first opened the doors to the Albright Fashion Library—the more than 15,000-dress-, 7,000 shoe-strong collection of contemporary couture, ready-to-wear, and accessories now housed in a massive 7,000-square-foot loft at 62 Cooper Square. “Irene was working with KCD and saw that people were running around chasing clothes, and she just decided to start buying [important pieces],” recalled the Library’s creative director, Patricia Black. “Eventually, people would come to her saying, ‘Oh, do you still have that sweater? Can I borrow it?’”

Today, after a decade functioning as a sort of dream closet for fashion insiders, the Library is feting its history, as well as the incredible individuals who have pulled from its continually evolving archive, with Albright Goes to School, an exhibition in partnership with the Fashion Institute of Technology and MAC Cosmetics that opens this evening at the Museum at FIT.

“I wanted to celebrate Irene, the Library, the stylists—the people who were working on the inside—the shakers and tastemakers,” said Black. “Without them, we wouldn’t have what we have in terms of this colossal space just packed from floor to ceiling with clothes.”

FIT

The show—a first look debuts here—features individual looks that ten stylists (June Ambrose, Paul Cavaco, Catherine George, Tom Broecker, Freddie Leiba, Lori Goldstein, Kathryn Neale, Mary Alice Stephenson, Kate Young, and Patti Wilson) created using iconic wares from the Library. A Tom Ford goat hair jacket layers over a Comme des Garçons tank in Goldstien’s look; Balmain is mixed with Givenchy and the artist’s own choker and face mask in Leiba’s; and Patti Wilson utilizes a Lanvin body harness to sex up an otherwise high glamour Yves Saint Laurent and J.W. Anderson combo.

There’s a rich history to the institution, and Black, Museum at FIT director and chief curator Valerie Steele, and set designer Stefan Beckman were tasked with expressing that through a tight narrative. “There are some incredible stylists who pulled these outfits, but they each have their own different story,” related Beckman, who described the installation as a “gritty fire escape urban idea.”

Steele added that the Museum’s interest in the exhibition stemmed, in part, from a desire to champion stylists. “People tend to think, Oh, designers make fashion. So it was important to be able to bring in stylists and show that they also have a really important role in putting looks together.”

The ten ensembles will be on display through March 31. The show marks the beginning of a greater collaboration between FIT and the Albright Fashion Library. “Irene is such an eclectic collector of everything from fashion to art to houses to people. So who knows what she’s going to start collecting next and where we’re going to take that,” suggested Black. “[But] I’m excited about the beginnings of seeing how we get to work and inspire the new generation of kids who dream of becoming the next designer, visual director, creative director, fashion editor, stylist, or costume designer. I’m hoping that we can lend a little bit of light to them in this moment.”

Photo:  
Photos: George Chinsee  

Faux and Fabulous

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jewelry prize

If you’ve ever fallen hard for a piece of high-fashion costume jewelry, chances are good that it has passed through Edgard Hamon. Founded in 1919, the atelier was the first to create belts for Chanel, and decades later, it was the first to thread strips of leather through metal chains.

Today, the Edgard Hamon archives scan like a who’s who of couture’s glory days: Yves Saint Laurent, Lanvin, Nina Ricci, Chanel, Givenchy, Thierry Mugler, Balenciaga, and Christian Lacroix have all called on Edgard Hamon at some point.

Which is why Lacroix, along with Elie Top, Paris Vogue jewelry editor Franceline Prat, and various other experts all gathered today at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Their mission was to elect the winners of the two first-ever Edgard Hamon awards: the Edgard Hamon Prize for Costume Jewellery, which goes to a designer under 30 years old who has worked in fashion jewelry in France, and the 3,000-euro Edgard Hamon Future Hope Prize for Costume Jewellery, which goes to a student in his or her last year at a European school of fashion.

The contestants were challenged to design pieces based on the work of a chosen architect, and tonight, Style.com can exclusively reveal the winners. Century Xie took the 15,000-euro Edgard Hamon Prize for Costume Jewellery, and Yao Yu won the Edgard Hamon Future Hope Prize for Costume Jewellery.

“We had a great time, they were incredibly creative,” said Lacroix of the selection process. “It was really beautiful. Many of them referenced Gaudí or Prouvé, for example. And many of them were influenced by Elie [Top].”

Top, the self-taught talent behind Lanvin’s fabulous baubles, replied that he was flattered to hear it. “Everyone’s always talking about bags and shoes, but costume jewelry really deserves attention. It’s so closely linked with fashion’s silhouettes, color, and what you want now—that’s the magic of it. There’s so much more to it than silver and gold.”

Xie’s line will be produced and displayed at Le Bon Marché; Edgard Hamon will produce three of Yu’s prototypes and she will receive an internship. The winners’ collections will be presented at an official ceremony at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs on July 4.

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

Eddie Borgo Escapes to Morocco

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Eddie Borgo

A singular color, Majorelle Blue, may be the starting point for Eddie Borgo’s Fall collection. But Borgo being Borgo, that was only the start of it. “I’ve always loved the color, I was familiar with Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé’s home in Marrakesh, but I wanted to find out more. Why this property? Why then?” he recalled in the Paris apartment where he presented his collection. Unraveling those questions led Borgo to photos of Chefchaouen, Morocco’s Blue City; the life of Talitha Getty and her jet-set entourage; and ultimately to interior designer Bill Willis, a friend to Getty and YSL and the interior decorator credited with bringing traditional Moroccan decor—mosaics, sandstone, bells, tassels, etc.—to mainstream design culture.

For Fall, Eddie Borgo gives those bells, tassels, and colors—cobalt, marigold, blood red—a rock-and-roll spin. He combines his signature geometric links with knots on an iteration of a Berber necklace, works starry black sandstone into large drop earrings, and recasts fez tassels as plugs that dangle from behind the ears. Among the lighter, more everyday pieces are a little bell necklace and flat, Tuareg-inspired rings that come in mix-and-match sets of four.

Elsewhere, a cuff bracelet and choker recall snake mosaics Willis created for a few of YSL’s bedrooms. “It’s really about him [Willis],” said Borgo. “The attitude is really specific to that place and time and those people.” No doubt Willis, a man known for living large and suffering no one, would have felt honored.

Photos: Courtesy of Eddie Borgo

Violeta Sanchez’s Adventures in Le Smoking

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Violeta and Luz SanchezFrench actress Violeta Sanchez, muse to Yves Saint Laurent and Helmut Newton, is bringing her story full circle. On Saturday, she will don a tux to present the Atelier Pallas Fall ’14 collection of made-to-order smokings and smoking-inspired jackets and dresses. And it will be a family affair, as Sanchez’s 15 year-old daughter, Luz, will model the pieces. It’s a nice display symmetry, as Sanchez’s own adventures in fashion started with a tuxedo.

“When I first started out, I spent all my time at the cinema. My ideal was Marlene Dietrich in menswear, so when I got my first paycheck, I ordered a smoking from a tailor in the eighth arrondissement. He came recommended by Paloma Picasso, who was doing our set and costumes,” she recalled the other day in the Pallas atelier in Paris’ ninth district. “He had never worked with a woman before, let alone one who was not yet 20, so he really threw his heart into it.”

Sanchez proudly wore that tux to her first premiere, the aptly-named play Succès. At the dinner that followed, she found herself seated with Saint Laurent and Newton. “I knew little about fashion, or Vogue, or Newton, or anything,” she admitted. But by evening’s end, Sanchez had two new friends and had made a promise for a shoot. Within days, she appeared on the Saint Laurent couture runway. “I didn’t fit the type of the time, so that story really started with a chance meeting that transformed and became something else.” It’s not so much a fashion story, she noted, than one about how what you wear can change your life.

Despite her many years with Saint Laurent, the smoking designed for her by Atelier Pallas owners Daniel Pallas and Véronique Bousquet is only the second Sanchez has ever owned (she still wears the original). “When I saw the atelier, I realized how much I missed that world. When I tried it on, I was hooked,” she laughed. “It was all really simple. I wanted to bring my story to theirs, out of conviction.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo