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Edin Kjellvertz and Lina Thofelt, owners of Dusty Deco vintage interiors.

Edin, you left Acne Studios to open up the very popular Dusty Deco with your wife, Lina, three years ago in a garage on Gärdet, where you sell a lot of Americana furniture. Was that a reaction to Scandinavian minimalism and aesthetics?

We did the whole thing really secretly and underground. We found an old garage in a residential area and started it up as a hobby. The first buying trip, [we] went to L.A. We rented a truck and drove Highway One to San Francisco, picking up all sorts of cool American things, from beaten-up, rusted chairs to old Coca-Cola signs. At first, I think people thought we were a bit crazy, but when we started to get some press and have the right connections, this grew, and I think the mind-set opened up a bit. At the same time, many clothing stores started to add the American look, and all of a sudden the look was a fact and average Swedes dared to bring some old rusted objects into their clean, white homes.

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Since then you have opened a second location and focused more on odd and eclectic pieces; how have you seen the inner-city Stockholm apartment transform in style?

We feel it is like night and day [between] now and three years ago. Our clients are much more open to crazy-cool objects today; people want to have a home that feels alive, and they want to have things that tell a story. It feels like it is OK to mix different materials and colors, which adds more character to their apartments. People travel more and read more blogs and international magazines. The eclectic mix has always been there, it just arrived a little later in Sweden. I mean, you can pick up a fifteen-year-old French magazine and find all of these elements that are [currently] making the Swede tip toward a cool, eclectic house rather then the white and clean. This is super-fun to see, but it also puts more pressure on us and other dealers to find crazier and cooler stuff; we need to source new ways and destinations all the time.

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What are your three top pieces in the store right now?

This is so hard, as we love everything! We only buy things we would like to have in our own house. I don’t know about Lina, since she is on a plane to Barcelona, but my top three are: a super-beaten-up cognac leather chair signed Poul Kjærholm, pictured; a set of three skulls, pictured, that are the Nordic big three: a wolf, a bear, and a lynx (so cool); and I just bought this giant American toy train inside a big glass box with lights in all the cars and lights over it, pictured. I wish I had the space for it at home, since this is one of the crazier things I have ever bought.

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What would be your ground rules for decorating a new space?

Don’t think too much and don’t hesitate; go with your first idea. That first feeling is always right. :) Dare to mix and dare to move things around; try not to furnish along the perimeter, move things out a bit. Play with lights (only buy filament bulbs for a soft, warm light), spend some extra on nice rugs, and don’t forget the walls—an art-and-photo wall can make an entire room. The most important is to enjoy doing it and have fun!

For more information, visit www.dustydeco.com.

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Posted By

Christian Remröd

Entrepreneur
Christian Remröd is the founder of Fashion Networks, a digital portfolio of Web sites that spans the globe and provides more than ten million readers with updates on fashion and ...